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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Dr. Darden is Warm Up Important?
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Dave Price

New Jersey, USA

This is part of a chapter from Arthur Jones Bulletin #1 from Intensity of Effort
A "cold" muscle is literally incapable of working within its existing level of reserve strength ? and unless an imposed workload is heavy enough to force the involved muscles to work well inside their momentarily existing
reserve levels of strength, then very little in the way of results will be produced.

Before it is even capable of anything approaching a maximum effort, a muscle must be properly "warmed-up" by the performance of several repetitions of a movement that is much lighter than its existing level of strength is
capable of handling.

If not, the muscle will "fail" at a point far below its actual strength level ? but such effort, even if carried to the point of muscular failure, will not provide much in the way of growth stimulation; because it is not heavy enough to force the muscles to work inside their existing levels of strength reserve.

Thus, with static exercise, a man can repeatedly work to the point of muscular failure ? while producing little or
nothing in the way of worthwhile results.
From this article is this proof that a trainee should perform lighter reps of an exercise or sets first than perform the exercise with the heavier work load?

I believe I've heard that from doing a normal set the involved muscles will warm up in the first few reps and thus will be warmed up. However from what Arthur Jones wrote above this method will not produce growth stimulation.

Perhaps from that time until now more about this subject has been learned and maybe their are different ideas on this. Any information will be appreciated thanks a lot.

Dave Price
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fantombe

"by the performance of several repetitions of a movement that is much lighter than its existing level of strength is capable of handling."

He's talking about the first several reps of a set. You can perform a specific warm up set if you like, some do.

Here's Dr Darden's article on warm ups from the "Hot Hit Tips" on the left there which agrees with what you posted from Jones:

http://www.drdarden.com/...ic.do?id=383498

Drew Baye also posted a good article explaining it here:

http://baye.com/warming-up
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

fantombe wrote:
"by the performance of several repetitions of a movement that is much lighter than its existing level of strength is capable of handling."

He's talking about the first several reps of a set.


Arthur's quote does NOT EVEN come close to meaning what you're saying it does.
____________________________________

We've had this debate a dozen times before.

Half say that no warm-up is necessary as long as you go slow on the first few reps.

The other half say warm-ups are essential to prepare the muscles, tendons, and ligaments for heavier loads and/or to get blood into the muscles before a maximal load is imposed.

ANSWER: Do whatever you want and whatever you're used to.

1. Do no "warm-up" sets per se, but at your own risk. Some of these folks proclaim that some mild stretching or calisthenics may be beneficial.

2. Warm-up, but don't "wear-out". Do a low-rep set or two with lesser weights. Avoid the 20-rep set crap --- big waste of time and energy.


That's it in a nutshell.
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fantombe

simon-hecubus wrote:
fantombe wrote:
"by the performance of several repetitions of a movement that is much lighter than its existing level of strength is capable of handling."

He's talking about the first several reps of a set.

Arthur's quote does NOT EVEN come close to meaning what you're saying it does.


If you stick to Jones's repetition guidelines, which in Buletin #1 could be up to 20, the first several repetitions of a set (which use a weight considerabley lighter than it's existing level of strength is capable of handling) will fulfil that requirement, and be in line with Jones's reccomendations for set performance.
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JohnV474

If I am training heavy enough that my reps are rarely above 8 or so, then I feel like I can not put in my full effort, especially in squats. To counteract this, I either use slightly lighter resistance to get up to 10+ reps (always, of course, to failure) or will do a short general warm-up (exercise bike for 3 minutes or something).

JohnV474
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goya

I find that a few low rep warm up sets on heavy compounds actually increase my strength.

I only do them for bench press, military press, squats and sldl. I don't warm up on isolation exercises which are usually done after compounds.

I don't think getting the muscles warmed up has anything to do with performance. I think it has more to do with practicing the movement i.e. getting the right form and getting your mind and nervous system ready for an all out effort.

Take squats for example, the easy warm up sets allow me to check and practice my form, fine tune my stance, check bar position on my back, see if I have any pain or tightness anywhere that might interfere with the movement. I rather make form mistakes with a light weight than an heavy weight. Obviously the goal is to correct them, but it's hard to get the perfect form with the heaviest weight right off the bat.

I usually do 1 set of 5-6 x 50-60% of my work set, followed by 2-3 reps at 80-90% of my work set. You probably don't need to do more than 3 warm-up sets. After doing those sets take at least a minute before jumping into main work set.

I don't believe in doing high rep warm-ups as you can get pretty close to failure on high reps even with a low weight.

If you only use good machines, you probably don't need to warm up. But if you do big compound barbell exercises, consider them practice for you work set.



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goya

bump

because this question came up again.
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