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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Dr. Darden Would Like Your Opinion on My Training.
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Dave Price

New Jersey, USA

Since starting H.I.T training over a course of about two years ago I have struggled to move forward. I would often have a hard time getting into the intensity that was needed for a good workout.

Many times I would actually have a great workout but I would also have too many poor trianing days as well. A lot of times I would do well and other days would be poor and I would find myself changing whole body routines. I never gave up as I felt that H.I.T training had much to offer.

I like to train in this fashion as it is challenging. I feel I may have made some mistakes along the way that may have held back progress such as not eating enough, getting the amount of sleep required, not taking layoffs, not having ntf training days and just yo-yoing back and forth with different routines and not having consistent workouts.

It may even be possible that my body has just adapted to the one set to failure basic whole body routines and that may be why Im not growing or getting stronger. My strength is fair on some exercises but I actually used to be a lot stronger when doing more sets of an exercise; why that is I'm not sure as of yet.

Possibly I should train less and try specialization routines? Or would it be ideal to train whole body with anywhere from 2-3 sets. Sorry to make such a long post Im just a little lost and have tried to figure out what I should do. Any information would be really appreciated. Thanks a bunch.

Sincerely, Dave Price
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Ellington Darden

Dave,

Sounds to me like you over-analyze just about everything related to training. If so, it's probably a natural part of your brain chemistry. Nothing you can do about it, except to hook up with a training partner who has the power to change your routine frequently without you knowing he's going to do it. If you KNOW what's about to happen, it will stress you too much. You must trust him, and go with it.

Ellington
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N@tural1

Ellington Darden wrote:
hook up with a training partner who has the power to change your routine frequently


Excellent advice Ellington, its something I strongly belive in and have expressed here on your forum. Often its hugely bennificial to make a change to a routine to further progress or to get through a sticking point. Works great for me.

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gerry-hitman

Dave Price wrote:
Since starting H.I.T training over a course of about two years ago I have struggled to move forward. I would often have a hard time getting into the intensity that was needed for a good workout.

Many times I would actually have a great workout but I would also have too many poor trianing days as well. A lot of times I would do well and other days would be poor and I would find myself changing whole body routines. I never gave up as I felt that H.I.T training had much to offer.

I like to train in this fashion as it is challenging. I feel I may have made some mistakes along the way that may have held back progress such as not eating enough, getting the amount of sleep required, not taking layoffs, not having ntf training days and just yo-yoing back and forth with different routines and not having consistent workouts.

It may even be possible that my body has just adapted to the one set to failure basic whole body routines and that may be why Im not growing or getting stronger. My strength is fair on some exercises but I actually used to be a lot stronger when doing more sets of an exercise; why that is I'm not sure as of yet.

Possibly I should train less and try specialization routines? Or would it be ideal to train whole body with anywhere from 2-3 sets. Sorry to make such a long post Im just a little lost and have tried to figure out what I should do. Any information would be really appreciated. Thanks a bunch.

Sincerely, Dave Price


Are you doing full body or split?
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N@tural1

Dave Price wrote:
It may even be possible that my body has just adapted to the one set to failure basic whole body routines and that may be why Im not growing or getting stronger. My strength is fair on some exercises but I actually used to be a lot stronger when doing more sets of an exercise; why that is I'm not sure as of yet.


It seems you've tried both HIT and multi-set routines and found that multi-set works for you better, this has been my experiance and many others.

There's nothing wrong here, just means you may have to re think your routine and do what you have found through personal experiance to work better for you.

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pharaoh1063

Dave,

...I would often have a hard time getting into the intensity that was needed for a good workout.

This sounds like a problem with your ability to psyche yourself up for you workouts. You may want to refer to a book called "Mind in Bodybuilding" or something like that. Look for articles on Frank Zane, who wrote a lot about mind issues.

Many times I would actually have a great workout but I would also have too many poor training days as well. A lot of times I would do well and other days would be poor...

This is a chicken and egg situation. Do you have poor training days because you lack confidence in your routine? Or do you lack confidence in your routine because you have poor training days? Only you can answer that one.

I feel I may have made some mistakes along the way that may have held back progress such as not eating enough, getting the amount of sleep required, not taking layoffs, not having ntf training days and just yo-yoing back and forth with different routines and not having consistent workouts.

So many times when we ask questions we really have a good idea what the answer is and I think you've hit on it. If you "feel" that these things are mistakes, then they are. Why? Because if they weren't, you'd know it. If you knew you were getting 8 hours of sleep a night and watching your diet to get the required amount of protein, carbs and fats, you'd know.

A lot of times I would do well and other days would be poor and I would find myself changing whole body routines.

I have not had productive experiences with constantly changing routines. When I was a teenager, I would be blown by the winds of whatever I read in bodybuilding magazines each month and change my routines constantly.

I would gain 10 lbs. on my bench press and then read that I needed to change and then move on to dips. I would gain a little there, and mistakenly thinking that the increase in dip strength would transfer back to the bench press, I would be disappointed to find that my bench press hadn't improved at all. Only later did I understand why this occurred. So I came up with something...

I suggest that if you change your routines often, simply keep the "big three" (i.e. the squat, the bench press and bent over rows, because we're bodybuilders, not powerlifters) the same at all times.

That way, you always have something concrete that you can use as your basic reference point to evaluate your routine. Then you can indulge your creative side and change other things in the routine at will! This will provide variety and stability at the same time.

First, never let any routine go for two years without any gains! Personally, I never let two workouts go without some improvement! Here's how...

This is a method you can try which should produce gains for you WITHIN THE NEXT WEEK. It's called microloading and a few people on this board use it. On Monday, let's say, bench press 50% of whatever weight you use for 8 reps to failure as a warm-up.

If you use 175 to failure for 8 reps, then use 90-95 lbs to warm-up. Then move into your heavy set of the bench press of 175 for 8 reps. Write down the weight and reps. Make Wednesday your ntf workout. So that day will be 175x6. On Friday, add exactly 1 pound to the bar and at all costs MAKE yourself do 8 reps. If you get 176 for 8, then, it works! You've progressed.

Again add 1 lb. to the bar on the following Monday and do 177x8. You can add these small poundages by purchasing 5 lb. wrist weights which have 4-5 roughly 1 lb. removable "pellets" inside of them. You can find them cheapest at WalMart. For 1 lb. and odd numbered increases simply put one wrist weight in the middle of the bar. For even numbered increases put both on either end.

If the rate of increase is too great, you can cut back to whatever rate you feel is best for you. There are no hard and fast rules. Just keep adding small amounts of weight. I recall some scientific study somewhere in which it was said that the human body cannot discern a 1 lb difference if the weight lifted is over 100 lbs.

So we are tricking the mind into gradually lifting heavier and heavier weights over time. With 2 years of training in your immediate past, you might need an A-B routine that provides more exercises per bodypart on one day than another. You definitely will need one ntf workout per week at your stage.

What's next? Simply keep on doing this until you fail to get 8 reps. When this happens take a week off. When you come back try it again or
make changes based on your records.

Hope this helps.
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Captain Puny

That's some very good advice from Pharoah and Dr. D. It might also help to hear a little bit more about what your goals, routine, body type, nutrition, and frequency are like.

I would just re-emphasize that regardless of what changes you choose to make, focusing on progress is without exception the most important thing you can do. Whatever you need to progress, whether it be more rest, more intensity, more high-quality nutrition, more confidence -- work to get it! If you can post your current info then folks on the board might be able to take some guesses as to what could be the missing element for you.

Good luck!
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