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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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HSDAD

Here is my latest workout. Pretty simple stuff and pretty much the same as previously posted with a few tweeks. Mostly I'm reposting because I got a new memory card for my camera which allows me to record longer periods ($13 including shipping on ebay!).

Legs first:

Squats(270lb.) immediately followed by leg extensions(with 120lb. straps, but as stated previously, that would be much more plate weight. When I go to gyms, I use 140 to 170 depending on the machine). Then shortly thereafter, calf raises(100lb.).

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=zA70WkuhQBE

I use a reverse preexhaust because I can take the leg extension to failure safely. I get my quads tired and then finish them off in isolation. With different equipment, I might do them the other way.

I switched to calf raises with the dip belt because with my arthritic great toes, it provides more stability and less pain than doing them one foot at a time as before.

For upper body, I do the same exercises as before. But my previous post I was doing them in the following order: pullover, bench pronated grip pullup.

Now it is supinated grip chins(30lb. on belt), bench press (2 85lb. dumbbells) followed by db pullovers (1 85lb. dumbell), then stiff-legged deadlifts.

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=HyUxQc3aC9k

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=d6H7M4JAjic

I was ready to move up my pullovers to 90lb. db, but by moving them after chins, I can still use 85lb. and get my lats thoroughly exhausted. I finish off with stiff-legged deadlift. I have cut my weight even further. This is a flexibility only exercise for me.

My hamstrings are way too tight to do truly stiff-legged deadlifts with serious weight.
I'm down to 140lb., but by the end of the set, my legs are pretty much straight. For me, that is nearly miraculous. Years of cycling with no other exercise have left me with the tightest hamstrings in the world.
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Mr. Strong

Those Chin ups were very good, keep working at them.
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

A very tough routine to be proud of, a question, I noticed your cadence was about 1/1. Have you ever attempted to slow it down on all exercises to at least 3/3 cadence.

Do you think it would cause a problem to try the slower cadence for a 6 week attempt?
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Nautilus1975

Damn - you don't look a thing like your avatar -

The camera is really slimming - no?
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

HSDAD wrote:
Here is my latest workout. Pretty simple stuff and pretty much the same as previously posted with a few tweeks. Mostly I'm reposting because I got a new memory card for my camera which allows me to record longer periods ($13 including shipping on ebay!).




HSDAD,

Would you say you are taking each set to failure?

Is this your whole routine? or just a few exercises?

Do you consider this a HIT workout?

If so why? If not, why not?

Most impressive exercise = Your Chins with Bodyweight + 30#

Best advice: GET A POWER RACK or at least some protection (stands) at the bottom of your squat.

http://www.newyorkbarbells.com...

Second best advice: Or get a TrapBar and combine LegExt with TrapBar Deadlifts Pre/Exhaust, doing the LE first.
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Waynes

Switzerland

rtestes wrote:
A very tough routine to be proud of, a question, I noticed your cadence was about 1/1. Have you ever attempted to slow it down on all exercises to at least 3/3 cadence.

Do you think it would cause a problem to try the slower cadence for a 6 week attempt?


Hi there,

Thats not HIT, your going far too fast, there must be so much off-loading, your not lifting the weights, momentum is lifting 75% of it for you, please slow down, as you know only teasing.

You have a great rep speed and form, your doing very well.

As I dont think you have been training that long ??? Two yeas is it ??? What kind of weight did you stat on please, as you are quite strong now. Could you also state your height and bodyweight ???

Going to be a bit critical here, but hey you might have lose quite a bit of weight for all I know, but if its more looks you are after you may need to lose a bit more bodyfat, is that your goal, and if so are your trying to do this, or maybe trying to get stronger and hopefully then hoping your extra muscle will burn a bit more of the bodyfat off. Not that your that much over weight, it may also be the video ??? But if you are just going for strength and are happy at your size I apologise.

As you know I am for the more advanced faster tempo, but I see nothing at all wrong with your style, mind you I only had one quick look, will veiw again and take more note.

Do you do any other exersices, say for arms ???

Wayne
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Waynes

Switzerland

rtestes wrote:
A very tough routine to be proud of, a question, I noticed your cadence was about 1/1. Have you ever attempted to slow it down on all exercises to at least 3/3 cadence.

Do you think it would cause a problem to try the slower cadence for a 6 week attempt?



Lets dont turn this into one of them threads, but actually his average rep speed was 1/2, and why would he want to go at 3/3 ??? One he would do less reps, and if he was to slow down he would have to use lower weights, cant you see slower reps is only for beginners, please state all the advantages of going slower, but in another thread.

Wayne
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HSDAD

Anything that involves the muscles of the back, I'm pretty strong. That's always been, but it's improved with training as well. My bodyweight is 215 or 220, so that's pulling up 250. If I lost 30 pounds of blubber, I'd need 60 lb. around my waist to do that. Now THAT would be impressive.
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HSDAD

In the winter, I work out on the soloflex mostly. Then I slow the reps and have even tried superslow. I've found the best gains by slowing down the first couple of reps and then going for broke on the positives as AJ originally recommended. If I plateau, that's when I'll try it. But for now, my poundages are going up and I'm OK with the form. . .but Drew Baye I'm not.
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HSDAD

Thank you. But I look more like my avatar than I ought to. I'll play around with aspect ratio next time to make it less painful on the eyes. ;-)
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HSDAD

BIO-FORCE wrote:
Would you say you taking each set to failure?


For the most part yes. Exceptions would be squats where the quads are subsequently taken to failure on the extensions. Safety forbids taking the squats to failure under current equipment restraints. Also the SLDL where they're being done for flexibility only (although those produce the most profound DOMS).

BIO-FORCE wrote:
Is this your whole routine? or just a few exercises?

That's the whole show. All done in 19 minutes.

BIO-FORCE wrote:Do you consider this a HIT workout?

yes

BIO-FORCE wrote:
If so why? If not, why not?


When another rep can't be completed in good form, the set is over. If body english becomes excessive, I'm not using the targeted muscles anyway. . .time to quit.
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

Waynes wrote:

Lets dont turn this into one of them threads, but actually his average rep speed was 1/2, and why would he want to go at 3/3 ??? One he would do less reps, and if he was to slow down he would have to use lower weights, cant you see slower reps is only for beginners, please state all the advantages of going slower, but in another thread.




Wayne, you and Bio-Force are the interlopers here. I would appreciate if you never response to one of my post. I don't care to hear what you or he has to say. You have nothing worthwhile to say and never have. I am sorry that you and he are allowed to post here. Get a life.

You and he are trying to dominate this forum, it is uncalled for and unappreciated by the vast majority. Why not fade away or start your own forum?

I will not response to any of your or his future posts, My wish is I would never see one, again.
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Waynes

Switzerland

HSDAD wrote:
In the winter, I work out on the soloflex mostly. Then I slow the reps and have even tried superslow. I've found the best gains by slowing down the first couple of reps and then going for broke on the positives as AJ originally recommended. If I plateau, that's when I'll try it. But for now, my poundages are going up and I'm OK with the form. . .but Drew Baye I'm not.


As you know I am more for the Arthur way, glad you enjoy it and are making good progress.

Well as long as your poundages are going up, all sounds good for now. Wondering how long you have been training and at what weight did you start on ??? And please how many times per week do you do this routine ???

HSDAD wrote:
When another rep can't be completed in good form, the set is over. If body english becomes excessive, I'm not using the targeted muscles anyway. . .time to quit.


Not sure why you said that, as if I excessively swing up a curl, really over did a cheat curl the biceps would be still being used, actually if you did a cheat curl right there would be more tenstion on the targeted muscles, in the positive, and as the weight would be heaver, there would be far more work being done on the positive.

Lets put it another way, I can run very good in a slow good form style of running, take a middle distance runner, then take the runner that goes all out and forgets what he wants to look like, the 100 meter sprinter, and this sprinter puts far more demands on the muscles and the targeted muscles, than the middle distance.

When the stabilizers are relaxed/lowered, the CNS also lowers the main muscle movers capacity.

But as you said at this moment in time your happy with the way you train, and are making progress.

Wayne


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Waynes

Switzerland

Hi rtestes,

Please if you have a question for John or me please direct it at one of us, as what Johns saying is from his head and has nothing to do with what I say at all.

I only asked a simple question, so why not just answer it ??? Why say all you did, as if we all agreed then this forum would not be here and no one would ever learn a thing.

As I asked please state all the advantages of going slower, but in another thread. You stated that he might like to try a slower speed; I just asked you what do you think the advantages are ???

I am HONESTLY NOT trying to get on your nerves or anyone elses, but if I am I apologise again, but all I did was too ask a simple question and holy hell breaks out, why are some here like this ??? Why can we not just have a friendly debate ??? Either you said what you did and can not answer or what ??? Don?t you want the truth and what works best

Wayne
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Thinkingthought

I don't really consider this high intensity training. The repetitions are WAY too fast. There is also a ton of time between exercises.

You really need to slow your reps down. Personally, I count to 4 going up and 4 going down. If you can't do 8 reps counting 4/4, then back off the weight. If you are able to do 12, add more weight next time.
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HSDAD

Thinkingthought wrote:
I don't really consider this high intensity training. The repetitions are WAY too fast. There is also a ton of time between exercises.

You really need to slow your reps down. Personally, I count to 4 going up and 4 going down. If you can't do 8 reps counting 4/4, then back off the weight. If you are able to do 12, add more weight next time.


Agree and disagree. Jones recommended slowing down your first reps to a second or so on the positive and once you get tired, do them as fast as possible. Notice that later reps are slower. But they are still as fast as I can do them at that time in the set. Dan Riley recommends the same.

That said, the goal of the whole current program is to get my squat poundage up over 300 for a meaningful set (10 reps is my definition). Once that is achieved, form on all exercises will become more of a focus. But I don't use body sway or hard jerks to begin the movements. They may seem fast to you, but my turnarounds are smooth and my rom pretty full. Also, I can hold the contractions in the chins, leg extensions etc. without bounce.

So I'm lifting, not throwing the weight. I'm a middle of the roader on rep speed. A 4 second negative on a weight that you can press easily is as difficult as a positive with 50% 1 rep maximum. It won't be of much benefit in my opinion.
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arnold strong1


When another rep can't be completed in good form, the set is over. If body english becomes excessive, I'm not using the targeted muscles anyway. . .time to quit.


Form is very subjective. In your squats I notice:

1. Lumbar flexion
2. Slight valgus
3. Forward lean
4. A lot of movement at your feet (heels raising)
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Thinkingthought

Yeah, because fast repetitions and good form on only one exercise is what HIT is all about.
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HIT61

It's good to see another bodybuilder using a soloflex. I think they are under appreciated. I've used one for about the last two years and really like it.

I think there is a bit too much flexion in your lumbar spine during squats and dead lifts. As for the squat, if you discontinue the manta ray, and let the bar ride a bit lower on your back, focus your eyes slightly upward, it is easier to maintain the proper extension in your lumbar spine.

You look like you train hard and have a good solid routine.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

arnold strong1 wrote:
Form is very subjective. In your squats I notice:

1. Lumbar flexion
2. Slight valgus
3. Forward lean
4. A lot of movement at your feet (heels raising)


Except for valgus (I admit I had to look that one up), I saw all those things. I did see the knees cock inward and not outward.

1, 2, and 4 could be helped by moving the bar down a little further on your back. The only problem for some is that this lower position can be tough on the shoulders --- getting the full rotation to comfortably maintain.

I'm not sure if it is a product of your arthritis, but you are not locking out at the top of those calf raises. The ROM on CRs is short enough --- don't jip yourself out of ANY of it. If you can't do that, then drop the weight.

I've always locked-out on CRs for at least a 1 count. After reading up on DC training, I've taken to a pause at the bottom too. Anywhere from 1 to 5 seconds depending upon the type of set I'm performing.

There's no critiquing I can do on your effort. It is definitely all out.

Best Regards,
Scott
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HSDAD

Thinkingthought wrote:
Yeah, because fast repetitions and good form on only one exercise is what HIT is all about.


Thank you for the nasty and unwarranted sarcasm. I never put myself up as a teacher. I was soliciting constructive criticism. Out of curiosity, which was the "good" exercise in your "humble" opinion?

This is how I try to guage my rep speed. I'm sorry if Arthur Jones proscription for barbell workouts isn't to your liking.

Arthur Jones wrote:
The first three or four repetitions in each set of every exercise should be performed at a speed well below the maximum speed that would be possible at that point ?

but starting with the fourth or fifth repetition, the speed of movement should be as fast as possible without jerking or bodyswing; the remainder of the repetitions in each set should be performed at maximum-possible speed ?

but the "actual speed" will be quite slow if the weight is as heavy as it should be, and the speed during the last one or two repetitions in each set will be extremely slow.


If the following link works, you'll hear Dan Riley talking about football workouts. Now while on some exercises they use what he calls slow reps, he also echoes AJ's words on others.

He mentions the intent to move the weight as fast as possible. Slowing the first few for safety is good for safety, but both of these HIT pioneers believe(d) in going as fast as possible in good form. So I'm not in too bad of company I figure.

http://www.houstontexans.com/...me=&play_clip=Y
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HSDAD

simon-hecubus wrote:
arnold strong1 wrote:
Form is very subjective. In your squats I notice:

1. Lumbar flexion
2. Slight valgus
3. Forward lean
4. A lot of movement at your feet (heels raising)

Except for valgus (I admit I had to look that one up), I saw all those things. I did see the knees cock inward and not outward.

1, 2, and 4 could be helped by moving the bar down a little further on your back. The only problem for some is that this lower position can be tough on the shoulders --- getting the full rotation to comfortably maintain.

I'm not sure if it is a product of your arthritis, but you are not locking out at the top of those calf raises. The ROM on CRs is short enough --- don't jip yourself out of ANY of it. If you can't do that, then drop the weight.

I've always locked-out on CRs for at least a 1 count. After reading up on DC training, I've taken to a pause at the bottom too. Anywhere from 1 to 5 seconds depending upon the type of set I'm performing.

There's no critiquing I can do on your effort. It is definitely all out.

Best Regards,
Scott


You'll get no arguement that my squats are a train wreck. I have very long femurs for my height and my flexibility is not what it should be. The long femurs are an asset in both cycling and deadlifting but a mess in squatting.

I've considered going away from the manta ray, I don't need it for comfort. But the reason I started using it in the first place was to effectively lengthen my torso and thereby minimise the necessary forward lean to maintain balance.

It has done that to some degree, and there is less pelvic rotation with it. But it's still a mess. If I go back to the lower bar position, all of the problems caused by long femurs and a short torso are futher exacerbated.

The foot movement you see is right when the heel starts to want to lift. That's my que to stop and turn around. As soon as I feel that movement, I turn around. You can see that even at only parallel, my knee and ankle angles are very acute. That's the problem with long femurs and short torso. The shorter your femurs, the easier and more natural squatting is.

I'm beginning to think maybe Kim Wood is right and that squatting is a bad idea. I can deadlift a transit bus (420lb. for 12 reps is my record)without all of these form difficulties. Maybe I should just trash the whole squat idea? Maybe it's just not the exercise for me. Whaddya all think?
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Ciccio

I see no problems with ditching the back squats. You could still use hip belt squats, front squats or db squats. According my experience they work much better with long femurs.

Franco
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Mr. Strong

HSDAD wrote:
simon-hecubus wrote:
arnold strong1 wrote:
Form is very subjective. In your squats I notice:

1. Lumbar flexion
2. Slight valgus
3. Forward lean
4. A lot of movement at your feet (heels raising)

Except for valgus (I admit I had to look that one up), I saw all those things. I did see the knees cock inward and not outward.

1, 2, and 4 could be helped by moving the bar down a little further on your back. The only problem for some is that this lower position can be tough on the shoulders --- getting the full rotation to comfortably maintain.

I'm not sure if it is a product of your arthritis, but you are not locking out at the top of those calf raises. The ROM on CRs is short enough --- don't jip yourself out of ANY of it. If you can't do that, then drop the weight.

I've always locked-out on CRs for at least a 1 count. After reading up on DC training, I've taken to a pause at the bottom too. Anywhere from 1 to 5 seconds depending upon the type of set I'm performing.

There's no critiquing I can do on your effort. It is definitely all out.

Best Regards,
Scott

You'll get no arguement that my squats are a train wreck. I have very long femurs for my height and my flexibility is not what it should be. The long femurs are an asset in both cycling and deadlifting but a mess in squatting.

I've considered going away from the manta ray, I don't need it for comfort. But the reason I started using it in the first place was to effectively lengthen my torso and thereby minimise the necessary forward lean to maintain balance.

It has done that to some degree, and there is less pelvic rotation with it. But it's still a mess. If I go back to the lower bar position, all of the problems caused by long femurs and a short torso are futher exacerbated.

The foot movement you see is right when the heel starts to want to lift. That's my que to stop and turn around. As soon as I feel that movement, I turn around. You can see that even at only parallel, my knee and ankle angles are very acute. That's the problem with long femurs and short torso. The shorter your femurs, the easier and more natural squatting is.

I'm beginning to think maybe Kim Wood is right and that squatting is a bad idea. I can deadlift a transit bus (420lb. for 12 reps is my record)without all of these form difficulties. Maybe I should just trash the whole squat idea? Maybe it's just not the exercise for me. Whaddya all think?



Keep Squatting, just keep working at it, this kind of thing sometimes take time.
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HSDAD

HIT61 wrote:
It's good to see another bodybuilder using a soloflex. I think they are under appreciated. I've used one for about the last two years and really like it.



Yeah, for some things the soloflex is great. In fact, I'm thinking of going back to it for squats with a mix of straps and plates. I think my form on squats is so atrocious that perhaps that would be better. What do you use your soloflex for generally, might I ask?
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