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Dr. Darden Your View of Diet.
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Dave Price

New Jersey, USA

When concerning diet how picky should one be. I know that I should eat a balanced diet of all foods 69% carbs 29%fats, about and 13% proteins. The problem is that I'm lost as to what to eat.

I keep reading articles saying to watch foods with carbs which could have a high glycemic load causing high blood sugar leading to fat, and to watch carbs during the day as insulin will cause fat storage.

Hearing all this what am I going to feed myself as I eat mostly fruits,whole grain breads, and other carbs along with my proteins and fats. How can I expect to grow without carbs since I get a lot of calories from these food sources?

I read your Massive Muscles in Ten Weeks Book. I was surprised at the simplicity of the diet and overall I believe it to be a good diet but with nothing super special;yet it did its job for Eddie.

Should I be so concerned about carbs and storing fat or is that all nonsense ,I read the articles on this subject on T-Nation. I don't know what to think, any information will be really appreciated. I'm just tired of reading all these articles wondering what is right.

Thanks Dave Price
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southbeach

Take a look at this:

"The limitation of the Glycemic Index, Mayer-Davis says, is that the numbers in the index are based on blood-sugar levels recorded two hours after the ingestion of test foods, in a controlled experimental setting and after a person has fasted overnight.

"However, many factors can affect the impact of food on glucose levels in a 'real life' setting, including the length of time that food is cooked, your body's hormones and other foods that are eaten at the same time," she says."

http://www.medicalnewstoday.co...



And THIS!:

"In her team's study, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, there was no association between high-GI eating habits and elevated blood sugar among 813 adults who were followed over 5 years. The findings, Mayer-Davis said, reinforce the notion that GI is "simply not a good index of how food impacts blood sugar."



'Glycemic index' questioned as diet tool

By Amy Norton Wed Mar 15, 3:58 PM ET

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Weight- and health-conscious eaters may not find
much help in following the so-called low-GI diet, a new study suggests.

In recent years, researchers have taken to classifying carbohydrates based on
their GI, or glycemic index -- a measure of the effects of a given food on blood
sugar levels.

High-GI foods, like white bread and potatoes, tend to produce a quick surge in blood sugar, and some studies have suggested that diets heavy in such foods can contribute to weight gain, diabetes and heart disease.

Books and Web sites espousing "low-GI" diets have followed suit.

But not all studies have found associations between high-GI foods and elevated blood sugar and diabetes. One reason is that it's hard to translate lab findings on glycemic index to the much more complicated realm of everyday eating, according to Dr. Elizabeth Mayer-Davis, the lead author of the new study.

One problem, she told Reuters Health, is that a food's GI is determined under
artificial conditions where a person eats the test food after a fast, then has blood sugar tests taken two hours later. But a food has different blood sugar effects when it's not eaten after a fast, she said.

In addition, many factors sway blood sugar levels after a meal, according to
Mayer-Davis, a diabetes researcher at the University of South Carolina in
Columbia.

These include the length of time a carbohydrate is cooked, the foods
it is eaten along with, and the workings of an individual's hormones, among other things.

In her team's study, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, there was no association between high-GI eating habits and elevated blood sugar among 813 adults who were followed over 5 years.

The findings, Mayer-Davis said, reinforce the notion that GI is "simply not a
good index of how food impacts blood sugar."

The health benefits that some studies have attributed to low-GI foods may
actually reflect other qualities of those foods - like high fiber content,
according to the researcher. Fiber-rich foods like whole grains are often lower
on the GI scale.

What's more, GI is a complicated way to judge a food's value. Certain vegetables, for instance, have a fairly high GI, but actually contain very few grams of carbohydrate and few calories. On the other hand, a dish of ice cream
may have a lower GI than a bowl of brown rice.

Mayer-Davis said that in her view, health-conscious consumers should not bother with seeking out the GI of their favorite foods.

The best move, she advised, is to keep calories in check and eat plenty of
fiber-rich whole grains, fruits, vegetables and beans - and to burn calories through regular exercise.

Many studies, she noted, show that obesity is the "major player" in the risk of diabetes, and weight control is essentially a matter of balancing calorie intake with calorie expenditure through physical activity.

SOURCE: British Journal of Nutrition, February 2006.
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