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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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FortCollinsFan

From My First Half-Century in the Iron Game, Chapter 68:

Apart from a rather limited number of hardcore bodybuilders who are misguided enough to believe that they have a
chance to compete against the outright genetic freaks that now dominate bodybuilding competition, just about anybody else in this country can produce nearly all of the potential benefits of proper exercise without spending much if anything in excess of about twenty dollars.

You can build both a chinning bar and a pair of parallel dip bars for a total cost of only a few dollars, and those two exercises, chins and dips, if properly performed, will stimulate muscular growth in your upper body and arms that will eventually lead to muscular size and strength that is very close to your potential. Adding full squats, eventually leading up to one-legged full squats, and one-legged calf raises, will do much the same thing for your legs and hips.

Using this very simple routine, when you get strong enough to perform about ten repetitions of one-armed chins with each arm, your arms will leave very little to be desired. Or, instead, you can do what many thousands of others are now doing and piss away thousands of dollars and years of largely wasted effort while producing far less results.

The choice is yours. One of the best pair of arms that I ever saw on a man belonged to a guy that I knew about fifty years ago in New York, and he never performed any sort of exercise apart from chins and dips, and damned few of them.

Can anybody refute these claims?
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Mr. Strong

You can't go wrong following that, too much over complication in the fitness industry today.



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FortCollinsFan

Bump for comments
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HITTrainingWien

of course he's right, but definitely not enough doing only those 3 ex with one set :D (even if he didn't mention one set training in this excerpt)

but fundamentally, RIGHT of course
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FortCollinsFan

I agree with you about the multiple sets for the chins and dips especially if someone is a beginner.
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davise

Hey when I was pressed for time I did a 3 x 3 with Squats, chins and dips for some metabolic conditioning. I was just trying to do something to stay in shape that didn't take up too much of the little free time I had. Surprisingly I put on muscle also. I only did the workout twice a week. Those three traditional exercises work most of the bodies muscle mass either directly or indirectly.
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karma50

Guys,
AJ was right about this, I think. I actually don't know too many people, especially over 40, who can do many chins or dips. I seldom see them done at the gym I go to. I think if you can do say, 10 chins for about 3/1/3, you are probably stronger than most of the adult population.

I am sure most of the people who post here are not typical, and much stronger, but for me, 10-12 is pretty good. I am not a bodybuilder or "weightlifter". I do a db and bw workout, but I also do rows and pushups, as well as chins and dips. Most of the bodybuilder types I see at the gym never do these exercises. They tend to do a lot of curls and tri presses.
Just an observation.
Griff
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cmg

I did a leg press, chin, dip, leg press, chin, dip a few years ago. I got in great shape and large and strong. I did so until I burned out which took about 2 months.

Regards,

Ron
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WesH

karma50 wrote:
I actually don't know too many people, especially over 40, who can do many chins or dips.


That's because it's hard to do chins and dips when you've got a 50 pound weight belt of human lard semi-permanently implanted around your waist.
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Crotalus

A couple years ago while training at home I did Trap Bar DL followed immediately with Clean and Press with a thick bar ; twelve reps each. I repeated this 'super-set' three times with a two minute rest in between. I picked a weight in each would be about three or four short of failure on the first set.

What a killer ...I was so winded it was scary ; I felt like I needed an oxygen bottle.

I talked with Roger Schwab one day many years ago and he described doing a short squat, negative dip and negative chin routine but regretted it in the long run.

He said he loved the routine but became so strong he ended up with permanent injuries. He really advocates pre-exhaust now.


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Tomislav

New York, USA

Crotalus wrote:
I talked with Roger Schwab one day many years ago and he described doing a short squat, negative dip and negative chin routine but regretted it in the long run.

He said he loved the routine but became so strong he ended up with permanent injuries. He really advocates pre-exhaust now.

Hi Crotalus,

I agree consolidation routines are tremendously effective, also agree the short squats are very effective. Think it's important to have perfect form on them (not go to failure) and keep the reps high since you have the potential to move so much weight.

Same goes for the negative dips; think there's got to be a point where an advanced athlete drops the negative dips in favor of regular weighted dips.

I don't see switching to pre-exhaust as making alot of sense for an advanced strength athlete though; what would Schwab do if the pre-exhaust made him too strong, switch to the Easy Glider?

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summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

You need to just look at Gymnasts for proof. Very frequent, high volume exercise, has build some of the best looking physiques as Arthur eluded to.
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

Tomislav wrote:
Crotalus wrote:
I talked with Roger Schwab one day many years ago and he described doing a short squat, negative dip and negative chin routine but regretted it in the long run.

He said he loved the routine but became so strong he ended up with permanent injuries. He really advocates pre-exhaust now.

Hi Crotalus,

I agree consolidation routines are tremendously effective, also agree the short squats are very effective. Think it's important to have perfect form on them (not go to failure) and keep the reps high since you have the potential to move so much weight.

Same goes for the negative dips; think there's got to be a point where an advanced athlete drops the negative dips in favor of regular weighted dips.

I don't see switching to pre-exhaust as making alot of sense for an advanced strength athlete though; what would Schwab do if the pre-exhaust made him too strong, switch to the Easy Glider?



I think pre-exhaust should be done sparingly because it really hammers your recovery ability.
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Crotalus


I think pre-exhaust should be done sparingly because it really hammers your recovery ability.



I find it's just the opposite for me. I've been training pre-exhaust with JREPS three years now and along with a diet change, have made great progress. I'm not trying to start an argument with the high carb guys or the anti-Brian Johnson group, just stating my experience.

Before this I trained Dr. Ken routines of the basic, compound exercises. There was no way I could train three times a week on those ... impossible.

With pre-ex routines spit three ways I have no problem with recovery. With Pre-Ex, half of your exercises are single joint movements that has much less effect on your whole system than the compound movements ; plus you're using a lot less weight in the compounds.

I'd say if I was training full body routines I'd only be able to train productively twice a week, but split this way I have no recovery problems at all.

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southbeach

If you are going to the bother of constructing a chin and dip apparatus incorporate the capacity for weighted NEGATIVES.

place steps or smthg that allows fully weighted negatives for added obvious benefit.

Having said that, the BEST bang for the buck is an investment in old style Nautilus Multi-purpose Machine.

Weighted chins and dips are a breeze on that great machine. you can also do heavy calf raise and deadlifts and a few other moves by creative individuals.

One of the best machines ever built is the Nautilus Multi-purpose!
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