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stevecollins33

I've heralded chiropractors on the forum before but thought I'd share my latest experience.

My lower back has been suspect for a few months following an episode featuring a front squat with heels elevated. However, the chiropractor adjusted it last month and I thought I was fine.

However, yesterday I completed a heavy leg session involving squats, lunges and Romanian deadlifts. Within 30 minutes of completing my workout I felt tightness in the lower back. After 60 minutes I could hardly walk.

I attended the chiropractor 24 hours later (today) and he attributed the injury to uneven lift - likely caused by a slight corkscrewing motion during the squat. He re-aligned my spine and the difference as I write is significant (even though I was only treated an hour ago).

He said that any uneven lifting style that goes untreated is a recipe for spinal disaster. After this near escape I would encourage anyone with a slight tightness following back/leg work to consult a chiropractor. It may be a sign that you need re-aligned.
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Marc1000

Thanks for sharing this.

Barbell back squats sometimes irritate my back. I had my wife video tape me squatting. My left side was always higher than my right side. I tried mobility work and make a real effort to push with equal force with each leg. However, every time my wife video taped me squatting the result was the same- the left side significantly higher than the right side.

I have now eliminated barbell squats. I now rely on dumbbell split squats, ball squats and bulgarian split squats to work my quads (I don't have access to a good leg press). My back feels a lot better. Barbell squats can be a great exercise, but they aren't for everyone.
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Mr. Strong

Try unilateral leg work, might help fix the imbalance.
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Acerimmer1

stevecollins33 wrote:
I've heralded chiropractors on the forum before but thought I'd share my latest experience.

My lower back has been suspect for a few months following an episode featuring a front squat with heels elevated. However, the chiropractor adjusted it last month and I thought I was fine.

However, yesterday I completed a heavy leg session involving squats, lunges and Romanian deadlifts. Within 30 minutes of completing my workout I felt tightness in the lower back. After 60 minutes I could hardly walk.

I attended the chiropractor 24 hours later (today) and he attributed the injury to uneven lift - likely caused by a slight corkscrewing motion during the squat. He re-aligned my spine and the difference as I write is significant (even though I was only treated an hour ago).

He said that any uneven lifting style that goes untreated is a recipe for spinal disaster. After this near escape I would encourage anyone with a slight tightness following back/leg work to consult a chiropractor. It may be a sign that you need re-aligned.


Slight tightness? Recipie for disaster? Your chiropractor sounds like a bit of a quack.

Ask him if he adjusts his pets. If he says yes run like hell.
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Landau

Florida, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:
stevecollins33 wrote:
I've heralded chiropractors on the forum before but thought I'd share my latest experience.

My lower back has been suspect for a few months following an episode featuring a front squat with heels elevated. However, the chiropractor adjusted it last month and I thought I was fine.

However, yesterday I completed a heavy leg session involving squats, lunges and Romanian deadlifts. Within 30 minutes of completing my workout I felt tightness in the lower back. After 60 minutes I could hardly walk.

I attended the chiropractor 24 hours later (today) and he attributed the injury to uneven lift - likely caused by a slight corkscrewing motion during the squat. He re-aligned my spine and the difference as I write is significant (even though I was only treated an hour ago).

He said that any uneven lifting style that goes untreated is a recipe for spinal disaster. After this near escape I would encourage anyone with a slight tightness following back/leg work to consult a chiropractor. It may be a sign that you need re-aligned.

Slight tightness? Recipie for disaster? Your chiropractor sounds like a bit of a quack.

Ask him if he adjusts his pets. If he says yes run like hell.


LOL!

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stevecollins33

Landau wrote:
Acerimmer1 wrote:
stevecollins33 wrote:
I've heralded chiropractors on the forum before but thought I'd share my latest experience.

My lower back has been suspect for a few months following an episode featuring a front squat with heels elevated. However, the chiropractor adjusted it last month and I thought I was fine.

However, yesterday I completed a heavy leg session involving squats, lunges and Romanian deadlifts. Within 30 minutes of completing my workout I felt tightness in the lower back. After 60 minutes I could hardly walk.

I attended the chiropractor 24 hours later (today) and he attributed the injury to uneven lift - likely caused by a slight corkscrewing motion during the squat. He re-aligned my spine and the difference as I write is significant (even though I was only treated an hour ago).

He said that any uneven lifting style that goes untreated is a recipe for spinal disaster. After this near escape I would encourage anyone with a slight tightness following back/leg work to consult a chiropractor. It may be a sign that you need re-aligned.

Slight tightness? Recipie for disaster? Your chiropractor sounds like a bit of a quack.

Ask him if he adjusts his pets. If he says yes run like hell.

LOL!



Apologies! I didn't account for the 'twat factor' when starting this thread. As for "quacks" - there are no shortage of them frequenting this forum so you should feel quite at home espousing your usual BS!
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Acerimmer1

stevecollins33 wrote:
Landau wrote:
Acerimmer1 wrote:
stevecollins33 wrote:
I've heralded chiropractors on the forum before but thought I'd share my latest experience.

My lower back has been suspect for a few months following an episode featuring a front squat with heels elevated. However, the chiropractor adjusted it last month and I thought I was fine.

However, yesterday I completed a heavy leg session involving squats, lunges and Romanian deadlifts. Within 30 minutes of completing my workout I felt tightness in the lower back. After 60 minutes I could hardly walk.

I attended the chiropractor 24 hours later (today) and he attributed the injury to uneven lift - likely caused by a slight corkscrewing motion during the squat. He re-aligned my spine and the difference as I write is significant (even though I was only treated an hour ago).

He said that any uneven lifting style that goes untreated is a recipe for spinal disaster. After this near escape I would encourage anyone with a slight tightness following back/leg work to consult a chiropractor. It may be a sign that you need re-aligned.

Slight tightness? Recipie for disaster? Your chiropractor sounds like a bit of a quack.

Ask him if he adjusts his pets. If he says yes run like hell.

LOL!



Apologies! I didn't account for the 'twat factor' when starting this thread. As for "quacks" - there are no shortage of them frequenting this forum so you should feel quite at home espousing your usual BS!


Steve you couldn't spot bullshit if it was floating in your Met-Rx.
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southbeach

stevecollins33 wrote:
I've heralded chiropractors on the forum before but thought I'd share my latest experience.

My lower back has been suspect for a few months following an episode featuring a front squat with heels elevated. However, the chiropractor adjusted it last month and I thought I was fine.

However, yesterday I completed a heavy leg session involving squats, lunges and Romanian deadlifts. Within 30 minutes of completing my workout I felt tightness in the lower back. After 60 minutes I could hardly walk.

I attended the chiropractor 24 hours later (today) and he attributed the injury to uneven lift - likely caused by a slight corkscrewing motion during the squat. He re-aligned my spine and the difference as I write is significant (even though I was only treated an hour ago).

He said that any uneven lifting style that goes untreated is a recipe for spinal disaster. After this near escape I would encourage anyone with a slight tightness following back/leg work to consult a chiropractor. It may be a sign that you need re-aligned.


Sounds like your treatment was successful?

What kind of treatment did you receive?
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

I go light on the bottom half of squat/lunge type moves then super load the top half (working them separately though sometimes coming up from the bottom half for a brief respite). That and 2 sessions a month on a MedX low back and MedX Rotary Torso keep things good from a spinal perspective.

Regards,
Andrew
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stevecollins33

southbeach wrote:
Sounds like your treatment was successful?

What kind of treatment did you receive?


Several manipulations are made on the spine. The key movement involves lying on your side and bringing one leg over the other in a kind of assisted twisting motion, then repeat on the other side. This elicits the 'crunch' sound.
You then lie face down and manipulations are performed on any raised vertebrae. This is rounded off by the famous neck twist and crunch which most people will associate the treatment with.

The whole process only takes 3-5 minutes but the difference in terms of pain relief and mobility was drastic. I now hope to be able to train my back/legs again in 7-10 days.
Stuart McRobert speaks highly of chiropractic use and urges lifters to periodically seek treatment even if they are not in pain.
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bobcop

I used to regularly do barbell back squats and during that time I experienced hip and back issues and had to see the chiropracor on occasion. About 6 years ago I stopped doing barbell back squats and switched to doing sissy squats. Because of this switch my back and hip area is totally pain free but even more incredible is my thighs got bigger with more sweep and my ass got smaller.

The way I do the sissy squats is a little different from Dr. Darden's version. Mine are full range where my ass touches my ankles and then as I come up I thrust hips forward and shoulders back.
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Acerimmer1

Scarring and adhesions are the route cause of almost literally every joint dysfunction and this is especially true of bodybuilders. Chiropractors are quite effective to treat the joint dysfunction which is symptomatic of these problems.

Physios are almost always unable to trace the route cause and usually end up only treating the soft tissue problems resulting from the joint and nerve dysfunction resulting from the initial and often minor soft tissue problem (which is even worse).

See a chiropractor once every 6 months or if you get pain then try ibuprofen for a week and if that doesn't work go to the chiropractor.

Spend everything else alloted to your therapy on a lowly massage therapist to blitz your entire body for scar tissue and adhesions and to prevent the deveopement of more of them. I've noticed these guys tend to spend more time on certain areas that they're go at so I alternate therapists. Massage will also improve your recovery speed.

Also buy a deep tissue massager and a theracane/pressure pointer and use it on yourself.

Massage is by far most effective but nobody wants to do it because it's hard work and it wrecks your hands.
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Acerimmer1

stevecollins33 wrote:
You then lie face down and manipulations are performed on any raised vertebrae.


Are you sure about that? Because that is actually quite worrying.

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southbeach

was it....

DR DETROIT!!??

"i have biznesses in Lansing! I have muffler shops.. I have chicken chains. I have slums to collect the rent from!

I have a chiropractic practice. I make adjustments to the human spine!"

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=xcX11TRTETU

Dr Detroit :)))
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Joshua Trentine

Ohio, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Scarring and adhesions are the route cause of almost literally every joint dysfunction and this is especially true of bodybuilders. Chiropractors are quite effective to treat the joint dysfunction which is symptomatic of these problems.

Physios are almost always unable to trace the route cause and usually end up only treating the soft tissue problems resulting from the joint and nerve dysfunction resulting from the initial and often minor soft tissue problem (which is even worse).

See a chiropractor once every 6 months or if you get pain then try ibuprofen for a week and if that doesn't work go to the chiropractor.

Spend everything else alloted to your therapy on a lowly massage therapist to blitz your entire body for scar tissue and adhesions and to prevent the deveopement of more of them. I've noticed these guys tend to spend more time on certain areas that they're go at so I alternate therapists. Massage will also improve your recovery speed.

Also buy a deep tissue massager and a theracane/pressure pointer and use it on yourself.

Massage is by far most effective but nobody wants to do it because it's hard work and it wrecks your hands.



In line with this theme an A.R.T therapist maybe helpful.
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Acerimmer1

Joshua Trentine wrote:
Acerimmer1 wrote:
Scarring and adhesions are the route cause of almost literally every joint dysfunction and this is especially true of bodybuilders. Chiropractors are quite effective to treat the joint dysfunction which is symptomatic of these problems.

Physios are almost always unable to trace the route cause and usually end up only treating the soft tissue problems resulting from the joint and nerve dysfunction resulting from the initial and often minor soft tissue problem (which is even worse).

See a chiropractor once every 6 months or if you get pain then try ibuprofen for a week and if that doesn't work go to the chiropractor.

Spend everything else alloted to your therapy on a lowly massage therapist to blitz your entire body for scar tissue and adhesions and to prevent the deveopement of more of them. I've noticed these guys tend to spend more time on certain areas that they're go at so I alternate therapists. Massage will also improve your recovery speed.

Also buy a deep tissue massager and a theracane/pressure pointer and use it on yourself.

Massage is by far most effective but nobody wants to do it because it's hard work and it wrecks your hands.


In line with this theme an A.R.T therapist maybe helpful.


Joshua my understanding from what I hear is that this is a good technique.

As I undestand it from what I've seen of Charles Poliquin performing ART on Youtube (which is the only place you can see or hear about it online as far as I know) is that it involves applying pressure to a muscle whilest either the client or the practitioner takes the joint through a ROM. This I imagine is done to enhance the stretch on the affected muscle tissue and possibly challenge adhesions.

Does this sound about right for the basic concept.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

[
However, yesterday I completed a heavy leg session involving squats, lunges and Romanian deadlifts. Within 30 minutes of completing my workout I felt tightness in the lower back. After 60 minutes I could hardly walk.

).

He said that any uneven lifting style that goes untreated is a recipe for spinal disaster.

==Scott==

I know some people can do squats till kingdome come and won't ever get injured but some of us aren't so lucky.I know you squat lover don't like to hear this but the above statement is exactly one of the reasons I stopped doing squats or deadlifts. Sure, they'll build your legs and ass quite well and stimulate your entire system to further growth but they can also lead you to very serious back problems. I prefer to work my legs and back in the safest way possible so I limit those leg /back exercises to machines which offer much less chance for major injury. What's the point of being able to squat 400 pounds at some point and then not be able to throw that heavy mattress on the car roof because your back is screwed up from years of squat related injuries?

Scott
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Joshua Trentine

Ohio, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Joshua Trentine wrote:
Acerimmer1 wrote:
Scarring and adhesions are the route cause of almost literally every joint dysfunction and this is especially true of bodybuilders. Chiropractors are quite effective to treat the joint dysfunction which is symptomatic of these problems.

Physios are almost always unable to trace the route cause and usually end up only treating the soft tissue problems resulting from the joint and nerve dysfunction resulting from the initial and often minor soft tissue problem (which is even worse).

See a chiropractor once every 6 months or if you get pain then try ibuprofen for a week and if that doesn't work go to the chiropractor.

Spend everything else alloted to your therapy on a lowly massage therapist to blitz your entire body for scar tissue and adhesions and to prevent the deveopement of more of them. I've noticed these guys tend to spend more time on certain areas that they're go at so I alternate therapists. Massage will also improve your recovery speed.

Also buy a deep tissue massager and a theracane/pressure pointer and use it on yourself.

Massage is by far most effective but nobody wants to do it because it's hard work and it wrecks your hands.


In line with this theme an A.R.T therapist maybe helpful.

Joshua my understanding from what I hear is that this is a good technique.

As I undestand it from what I've seen of Charles Poliquin performing ART on Youtube (which is the only place you can see or hear about it online as far as I know) is that it involves applying pressure to a muscle whilest either the client or the practitioner takes the joint through a ROM. This I imagine is done to enhance the stretch on the affected muscle tissue and possibly challenge adhesions.

Does this sound about right for the basic concept.



YUP.

Miraculous for certain soft tissue injuries.

http://www.activerelease.com/

the link has a section for certified therapists by state
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

southbeach wrote:
Sounds like your treatment was successful?

What kind of treatment did you receive?


stevecollins33 wrote:
Several manipulations are made on the spine. The key movement involves lying on your side and bringing one leg over the other in a kind of assisted twisting motion, then repeat on the other side. This elicits the 'crunch' sound...


This is a sacrum/pelvis adjustment too, an issue which I've had some recent problems with. Part of my problems involved tightness in the outer portion of the glutes and the hip flexors.

While sitting, put your left foot on the lower part of the right quad with the outer ankle resting downward. Now grab your left knee and pull it towards you. If you have the same issues I do, you feel the 'pull' right away. Hold this stretch for 10-15 seconds and do the other side.

Regards,
Scott

P.S. I strongly advocate ART. It worked wonders for some RC issues I hade.
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Joshua Trentine

Ohio, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
southbeach wrote:
Sounds like your treatment was successful?

What kind of treatment did you receive?


stevecollins33 wrote:
Several manipulations are made on the spine. The key movement involves lying on your side and bringing one leg over the other in a kind of assisted twisting motion, then repeat on the other side. This elicits the 'crunch' sound...

This is a sacrum/pelvis adjustment too, an issue which I've had some recent problems with. Part of my problems involved tightness in the outer portion of the glutes and the hip flexors.

While sitting, put your left foot on the lower part of the right quad with the outer ankle resting downward. Now grab your left knee and pull it towards you. If you have the same issues I do, you feel the 'pull' right away. Hold this stretch for 10-15 seconds and do the other side.

Regards,
Scott

P.S. I strongly advocate ART. It worked wonders for some RC issues I hade.



This technique is a way to help mobilize the Ilium posterior. The stretch is usually felt in a tight piriformis.

This type of Sacroiliac dysfunction is very common. I recently described protocol for these disorders

http://drdarden.com/...ic.do?id=505501
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stevecollins33

entsminger wrote:
[
However, yesterday I completed a heavy leg session involving squats, lunges and Romanian deadlifts. Within 30 minutes of completing my workout I felt tightness in the lower back. After 60 minutes I could hardly walk.

).

He said that any uneven lifting style that goes untreated is a recipe for spinal disaster.

==Scott==

I know some people can do squats till kingdome come and won't ever get injured but some of us aren't so lucky.I know you squat lover don't like to hear this but the above statement is exactly one of the reasons I stopped doing squats or deadlifts. Sure, they'll build your legs and ass quite well and stimulate your entire system to further growth but they can also lead you to very serious back problems. I prefer to work my legs and back in the safest way possible so I limit those leg /back exercises to machines which offer much less chance for major injury. What's the point of being able to squat 400 pounds at some point and then not be able to throw that heavy mattress on the car roof because your back is screwed up from years of squat related injuries?

Scott


Scott, to be fair I had no real lower back issues at all over the last two years - and that's despite always having the squat in my programmes.
The issue, for me, has been the age old problem of poor technique as a result of too heavy a load. I was also warned by the chiropractor last year that I needed to improve flexibility in the glutes, hamstrings, etc, and to be honest I didn't bother.

For what it's worth, I agree with your assessment regarding alternative exercises. I've found single leg movements such as Bulgarian split squats a revelation. But I love squatting and I'd hate not to be able to do it so I'm determined to ease back into it when fully fit.
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southbeach

Trying to thoroughly work your hip & thighs by perching the weight on the lower end of your neck is absurd.

you are ASKING for spinal joint trouble!

i work the thighs & hips under load with a bit more proximity to the joints in question. that makes hellva lot more sense ;|
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