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Is Running Really all that Bad?
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Landau

Florida, USA

entsminger wrote:
Maybe I missed this in all the back and forth crap in this thread and there's a load of it? So if running or other similar exercises don't work the cardiovascular, system/heart lungs etc, what, pray tell does? No rest between sets ??

Scott



For??????????????????
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Landau

Florida, USA

Natty wrote:
entsminger wrote:
Maybe I missed this in all the back and forth crap in this thread and there's a load of it? So if running or other similar exercises don't work the cardiovascular, system/heart lungs etc, what, pray tell does? No rest between sets ??

Scott

^^Such is the mentality of the cultist jedi. Nothing works but one slow single set to failure.. FOR EVERYTHING!

It's laughable Scot.


See what you don't know is that you are wrong according to the greatest running philosopher of all time, but you never bothered to check. Look it up on the Internet (I never have to) - it's uncommon knowledge in the industry.

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N@tural1

Landau wrote:
See what you don't know is that you are wrong according to the greatest running philosopher of all time, but you never bothered to check. Look it up on the Internet (I never have to) - it's uncommon knowledge in the industry


You tell me to look it up but don't give me a name.. I wonder why! You're "running philosopher" DOES NOT EXIST!

Landau ... Alters his own reality to defend his cultist religion to SSTF what a freakin joke.

Running philosopher? Give me a name and what he said, guess what.. YOU WON'T!! YOU CAN'T!!

You look proper stupid now. A real "asset" to HIT (NOT)
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Landau

Florida, USA

Sheehan
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Landau

Florida, USA

Natty wrote:
Landau wrote:
See what you don't know is that you are wrong according to the greatest running philosopher of all time, but you never bothered to check. Look it up on the Internet (I never have to) - it's uncommon knowledge in the industry

You tell me to look it up but don't give me a name.. I wonder why! You're "running philosopher" DOES NOT EXIST!

Landau ... Alters his own reality to defend his cultist religion to SSTF what a freakin joke.

Running philosopher? Give me a name and what he said, guess what.. YOU WON'T!! YOU CAN'T!!

You look proper stupid now. A real "asset" to HIT (NOT)


Practicality - By the way son - I am not religious, went away from that since age 13 - are you religious son? - a chance to gain credibility at least in this instance
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N@tural1

Landau wrote:
Practicality - By the way son - I am not religious, went away from that since age 13 - are you religious son? - a chance to gain credibility at least in this instance


It's not me that lacks credibility. I have presented to you indisputable facts which you are unable to counter.

Landau wrote:
Sheehan


"No matter how old I get, the race remains one of life's most rewarding experiences. My times become slower and slower, but the experience of the race is unchanged: each race a drama, each race a challenge, each race stretching me in one way or another, and each race telling me more about myself and others".

- George Sheehan.

Yer David.. REALLY sounds like he held running in low regard!
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Landau

Florida, USA

From the Landau Research Library:

"You might suspect from the emphasis on 'cardio' fitness that the major effect of training is the heart and lungs. Guess Again. Exercise does nothing for the heart and lungs that's been amply proved." Sheehan
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N@tural1

Landau wrote:
From the Landau Research Library:

"You might suspect from the emphasis on 'cardio' fitness that the major effect of training is the heart and lungs. Guess Again. Exercise does nothing for the heart and lungs that's been amply proved." Sheehan


Said that the EMPHASIS is not on heart/lungs. Also, that there's no outright evidence exercise does anything for heart lungs, he didn't say that he didn't believe it not to.

Anyhow who made Sheehan THE highest authority on cardio? YOU? Just because you say so? Another thing, you say he was a running philosopher, philosophy and exercise SCIENCE/PHYSIOLOGY are not related.

Isn't it interesting how ANY sports coach I've ever quoted is null and void and "meathead" in your opinion, yet we must except YOUR preferred philosophers people as the gospel truth! HYPOCRITE!

So I'll ask you again (boring)

Someone that runs regularly gets better AT running because the body adjusts, WHY/HOW if running/cardio does nothing?

A team of US researchers from the University of Texas says that walking, weightlifting, flexibility training and other forms of exercise can help older people avoid the disabilities normally associated with ageing - and even reverse the ageing process itself.

The researchers cite several studies that demonstrate the benefits of exercise on the ageing process. These include:

A walking programme for people in their seventies that reversed 22 years of declining lung capacity in 22 weeks.

A study in which people who exercised by walking several days a week decreased their risk of disability and improved their ability to climb stairs, stoop, crouch and kneel.

The researchers warn that of all lifestyle factors, inactivity is most likely to lead to coronary artery disease.

They cite a study in which patients who already had coronary artery disease reduced their risk of fatal heart complications by 20-25% through exercise.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/...alth/270266.stm

Physically active people have cells that look younger on a molecular level than those of couch potatoes, according to new research that offers a fundamental new clue into how exercise may help stave off aging.

The study, involving more than 2,400 British twins, found for the first time that exercise appears to slow the shriveling of the protective tips on bundles of genes inside cells, perhaps keeping frailty at bay.

"These data suggest that the act of exercising may actually protect the body against the aging process," said Tim D. Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King's College in London who led the study, published yesterday in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Previous research has shown that being physically active reduces the risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases, potentially extending longevity. In the hopes of helping explain how, Spector and his colleagues examined structures known as telomeres inside cells.

Telomeres cap the ends of chromosomes, the structures that carry genes. Every time a cell divides, the telomeres get shorter. When the telomeres get too short, the cell can no longer divide. Scientists believe that aging occurs as more and more cells reach the end of their telomeres and die -- muscles weaken, skin wrinkles, eyesight and hearing fade, organs fail, and thinking clouds.

Spector and his colleagues analyzed the telomeres from white blood cells collected from 2,401 twins participating in a long-term health study, examining whether there was a relationship between the subjects' telomere length and how much exercise they got in their spare time over a 10-year period.

"We're using telomere length as a marker of our rate of biological aging," Spector said.

The length of the twins' telomeres was directly related to their activity levels, the researchers found. People who did a moderate amount of exercise -- about 100 minutes a week of activity such as tennis, swimming or running -- had telomeres that on average looked like those of someone about five or six years younger than those who did the least -- about 16 minutes a week. Those who did the most -- doing about three hours a week of moderate to vigorous activity-- had telomeres that appeared to be about nine years younger than those who did the least.

"There was a gradient," Spector said. "As the amount of exercise increased, the telomere length increased."

Other researchers said the findings are intriguing.

"It's another jigsaw piece in trying to understand why exercise is important in longevity," said L. Stephen Coles, who studies aging at the University of California at Los Angeles. But Coles and others stressed that much more research is needed to definitively establish a causal relationship between exercise and aging.

"It's a fairly strong association and a very interesting association," said Jack M. Guralnik of the National Institute on Aging, who wrote an editorial accompanying the research. "But we have to interpret this with caution. People who choose to exercise are different in many ways from people who don't exercise. It's always difficult from these observational studies to determine whether it's the exercise that's having the effects."

Spector said the association held even after the researchers took into consideration factors that might explain the findings, such as the possibility that those who exercised least were more likely to smoke or to be obese or sick.

"We checked to make sure it wasn't due to obesity or smoking or marital status and everything else we could think of," Spector said. "We still found this marked effect."

When the researchers compared the least and most active twins with each other, they found about four years' difference in their telomeres, Spector said. "We wanted to see if we could account for the effect of genes," he said.

Spector said he hopes doctors can use the findings to encourage people to exercise.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/...8012801873.html
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N@tural1

Aerobic exercise, especially running, may delay disability and even death in those over 50 years of age.

A new study, conducted from 1984 to 1997, compared the health of 370 members of a running club with that of 249 people not in the club. All participants were at least 50 years of age in 1984.

Members of the running club lived longer, had lower rates of cancers, heart disease and other conditions, and developed disabilities close to nine years later, than non-members.

To gage heath, researchers questioned participants annually about several areas including dressing and grooming, personal hygiene, walking, reach, grip and activities, such as running errands.

Participants who occasionally ran for exercise, even though not members the running club, were also less likely to develop a disability than non-runners. Additionally, non-runners were more than three times as likely to die during the study from all types of illnesses.

The benefits of running and other aerobic exercise appeared even in those who had only recently begun to be active. This indicates that people who begin exercising in their middle age can reap its health benefits, the study noted.


http://articles.mercola.com/...g-part-one.aspx
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N@tural1

Regular exercise cuts cholesterol levels in men with type 1 diabetes, possibly lowering their risk of heart disease, new research shows.

Researchers studied 42 young men with type-1 diabetes.

Half of the men followed an exercise regimen of running for a half-hour to an hour, three to five times per week.

The other men continued their usual exercise habits.

After several months, the exercise group saw their LDL ("bad") cholesterol drop, along with levels of other blood fats. At the same time, up went their levels of heart-protecting HDL cholesterol.

The effects were greatest among men who started off with the worst cholesterol levels.


http://articles.mercola.com/...holesterol.aspx

-----------------------------------

Every person who takes up running has been confronted by a "helpful" critic who is more than happy to reel off the reasons running will ruin your life. Here's a look at three questionable claims about running and health:

1. Running will give you a heart attack or other heart problems. It is true that exercise temporarily raises the odds of a heart attack while you're mid-workout, but doing it consistently reduces that risk over the long haul, leading to a net benefit. Going for a run most days of the week is doing far more good than bad for your heart.

2. Running will ruin your bones and joints. A study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found no evidence of accelerated rates of osteoarthritis among long-distance runners. Weight-bearing exercise like running helps stave off osteoporosis by maintaining bone mineral density.

3. Running will kill you before your time. According to a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, running and other vigorous exercise in middle age is associated with a longer life. Not only that, it will make your later years more pleasant by reducing disability.


http://articles.mercola.com/...our-health.aspx

-----------------------------------

There's no shortage of research corroborating the health benefits of physical exercise, such as running. Studies have shown that regular exercise can:

Cut cholesterol levels in men with type 1 diabetes

Reduce ovarian cancer risk

Prevent impotence

Reduce diabetes by reducing insulin resistance

Promote weight loss without dieting

Reduce effects of aging


Dr. Mercola.

-----------------------------------

Exercise can cause structural changes in the heart -- and the changes can vary depending on the type of exercise.

Researchers found that endurance athletes showed an increase in the size of both their left and right ventricles after 90 days of team training. However, athletes who only did strength training had excessive growth in their left ventricles, but no change at all in their right ventricle size.

In addition, the ability of the left ventricle to fully relax between beats (diastolic function) was enhanced in the endurance athletes, but it worsened in the strength trainers.

In this study, the endurance group consisted of long-distance rowers, whose exercise regimen consisted of daily running, cycling, swimming, rowing or using an aerobic machine with sustained effort for at least 20 minutes a day.


http://articles.mercola.com/...as-muscles.aspx
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N@tural1

Here's the killer study just for you David:

Exercise Type and Intensity in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease in Men.

Mihaela Tanasescu, MD; Michael F. Leitzmann, MD; Eric B. Rimm, ScD; Walter C. Willett, MD; Meir J. Stampfer, MD; Frank B. Hu, MD

JAMA. 2002;288:1994-2000.

Context Studies have shown an inverse relationship between exercise and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but data on type and intensity are sparse.

Objective To assess the amount, type, and intensity of physical activity in relation to risk of CHD among men.

Design, Setting, and Participants A cohort of 44 452 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study, followed up at 2-year intervals from 1986 through January 31, 1998, to assess potential CHD risk factors, identify newly diagnosed cases of CHD, and assess levels of leisure-time physical activity.

Main Outcome Measure Incident nonfatal myocardial infarction or fatal CHD occurring during the follow-up period.

Results During 475 755 person-years, we documented 1700 new cases of CHD. Total physical activity, running, weight training, and rowing were each inversely associated with risk of CHD. The RRs (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) corresponding to quintiles of metabolic equivalent tasks (METs) for total physical activity adjusted for age, smoking, and other cardiovascular risk factors were 1.0, 0.90 (0.78-1.04), 0.87 (0.75-1.00), 0.83 (0.71-0.96), and 0.70 (0.59-0.82) (P<.001 for trend). Men who ran for an hour or more per week had a 42% risk reduction (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.44-0.77) compared with men who did not run (P<.001 for trend). Men who trained with weights for 30 minutes or more per week had a 23% risk reduction (RR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.61-0.98) compared with men who did not train with weights (P = .03 for trend). Rowing for 1 hour or more per week was associated with an 18% risk reduction (RR, 0.82; 05% CI, 0.68-0.99). Average exercise intensity was associated with reduced CHD risk independent of the total volume of physical activity. The RRs (95% CIs) corresponding to moderate (4-6 METs) and high (6-12 METs) activity intensities were 0.94 (0.83-1.04) and 0.83 (0.72-0.97) compared with low activity intensity (<4 METs) (P = .02 for trend). A half-hour per day or more of brisk walking was associated with an 18% risk reduction (RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-1.00). Walking pace was associated with reduced CHD risk independent of the number of walking hours.

Conclusions Total physical activity, running, weight training, and walking were each associated with reduced CHD risk. Average exercise intensity was associated with reduced risk independent of the number of MET-hours spent in physical activity.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/...ull/288/16/1994

Landau. Science > philosophy.
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southbeach

Good solid research Natty, here's another:

J Hum Hypertens. 2007 Jun;21(6):452-60. Epub 2007 Mar 15.Click here to read Links

Acute exercise-induced nitric oxide production contributes to upregulation of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in healthy subjects.

"Exercise has been proved to promote the number and activity of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in humans, which contributes to improvement in endothelial function and maintenance of cardiovascular homoeostasis."

"The present study demonstrates for the first time that acute exercise-induced NO production contributes to upregulation of circulating EPCs in healthy subjects, which suggests that NO plays an important role in the regulation of exercise on circulating EPCs."


Dave,

You should update your knowledge database. This is the 21st century. ;)
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N@tural1

southbeach wrote:
Dave,

You should update your knowledge database. This is the 21st century. ;)


Don't hold your breath SB. Landau prefers "philosophy" over science/physiology any day.
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southbeach

Some more evidence that exercise esp cardio has health benefits.

Even modest exercise can reduce negative effects of belly fat

"At the end of the study, the 'cardio' group had lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), less belly fat, and improved general fitness than the 'flex' group," said Ph.D. candidate Vieira.

"The lower CRP levels were partially mediated by the reduction in trunk fat," she explained.

http://www.eurekalert.org/...a-eme042309.php
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Waynes

Switzerland

Natty wrote:
southbeach wrote:
Dave,

You should update your knowledge database. This is the 21st century. ;)

Don't hold your breath SB. Landau prefers "philosophy" over science/physiology any day.


Running is a great exercise, for the extra fitness of the whole body, if its not overdone.

Wayne

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parker1

It isn't the running.

It is a combination of several key factors:

1. Most people weigh too much to run and should walk. How many hunter-gatherer societies have populations comprised of heavily muscled or overweight men or women? 99.9999% chance the answer is zero.
2. The majority of runners train on pavement. Our ancestors were trail runners. Get off the sidewalk and find a dirt path whenever possible.
3. Too many people run in shoes with heels that are too high.

Humans are mobile animals. Movement is what we're all about...we moved to get food, escape attackers, migrate, etc. A sedentary lifestyle is foreign to our body's design. In fact, read the book _Younger Next Year_. The doctor who wrote half the publication lists a unique biochemical reaction that takes place in response to "aerobic" movement.

Further, as strength animals, humans are pretty pathetic...a 200lb ape could tear a 250lb male strength trainer to pieces in seconds. As endurance animals (land based), humans have very few peers.
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N@tural1

David Landau.

If you ignore studies, research and science. Just where do you get your information from?
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

I know this isn't exactly running but if I recall it might have been mentioned that other cardio exercises like swimming etc are useless as well? Last week I did 5 sprints of 30 seconds all out with 30 seconds rest between on my concept 2 rower. By the end I was gasping for breath as If I'd done a killer set of squats. I felt exausted for two days after. I was exausted but didn't feel any muscle soreness what so ever. They really tax the system. There's no way that it didn't work the heart and lungs.

Scott
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southbeach

right, because you really are not fit.

your not the only one that's deluded themselves in this area :|
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N@tural1

southbeach wrote:
right, because you really are not fit.

your not the only one that's deluded themselves in this area :|


David left the building. He was pwned.
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Landau

Florida, USA

Hey HS - I have been traveling. When juveniles finally understand their delusional circumstances, it will be too late for them to fix their ignorance. Galapagos Turtles do Cardio - do you get it? F F.
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N@tural1

Landau wrote:
Hey HS - I have been traveling. When juveniles finally understand their delusional circumstances, it will be too late for them to fix their ignorance. Galapagos Turtles do Cardio - do you get it? F F.


You're a fool. You're still pwned. On what do you base your beliefs on if not exercise studies, research, science and physiology? .. Philosophy? LOL!
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Mr. Strong

Natty wrote:
Landau wrote:
Hey HS - I have been traveling. When juveniles finally understand their delusional circumstances, it will be too late for them to fix their ignorance. Galapagos Turtles do Cardio - do you get it? F F.

You're a fool. You're still pwned. On what do you base your beliefs on if not exercise studies, research, science and physiology? .. Philosophy? LOL!




What came first, productive training methods or physiological understanding?
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Landau

Florida, USA

See your wishes come true in "exercise studies" that have an agenda. I deal with Medical Professionals on a DAILY Basis and all you can do is quote studies that mirror your fantasies? Rumors are correct, you are what you are - that's why you stay in your garage. I'm a fool HUH? James T - your turn now!
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N@tural1

Landau wrote:
See your wishes come true in "exercise studies" that have an agenda. I deal with Medical Professionals on a DAILY Basis and all you can do is quote studies that mirror your fantasies? Rumors are correct, you are what you are - that's why you stay in your garage. I'm a fool HUH? James T - your turn now!


Funny. Not one health professional I've ever met has told me to be a sedentary lazy arse. I wonder why.

Perhaps your "health professional" friends can provide you with studies or some type of substance that backs up your claims that cardio has zero benefits?

And while you're at it, I'm still waiting on your answer on WHY a runner is better at running than a non runner IF there are no benefits/adaptations?

Will you provide something substantial? I doubt it.

*awaits more opinion*
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