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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Bastion

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=74wtpTvpBHo
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

I luv the Hammer OHP, I don't like the handles of the pulldown but the feel of the move is decent (all the hammer is nice and smooth). I think he should have gotten more of a stretch and pre downward shrug each rep. As well I don't usually support the use of abs at the bottom where he crunches into it I'd rather see chest up and shoulder blades squeezing together. Abs can be done in a different set ;n). I dislike the decline press machine but he seems to be built better for it than I. With the Nautilus Row I would have him keeping his shoulders down and relaxing his upper back more. Possibly but hard to tell form that angle I may have encouraged him to bring elbows in a bit closer. Again shrugging in s recommended in my books. Nice controlled rep cadence though I might have him push a few seconds longer when he stalls. Husky guys do good on this type of training but I'd bet regardless of the weight he adds over time this only maintains him after the first few months.

As always nice to see HIT being performed cleanly and purposefully.

Regards,
Andrew
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

I disagree about the pushing a bit longer on the stalls part. Menzter indicated that too much statics-against-the-weight time can cause excessive inroading and should be used infrequently and with care.

I have found that too much end-set statics wears me out. Not all of us can take that much "knob turned to 11" stuff all the time. It causes me excess soreness and I DON'T think it pays off in added results equal to the efforts --- especially if your system hasn't recuperated enough between sessions.
______________________________

I know Mark doesn't like coming around here any more, but I was wondering James could tell us what type of progression he had him on for the 5-week period mentioned in the video. Was it 5-lbs/wk or 10-lbs/wk or something different than that?

Regards,
Scott

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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

HIT27 wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/...pTvpBHo


They forgot , " NO rubberbands , NO bullshit , NO pretensions .

This is HIT , there is no mistaking it for anything else.

I hope everybody reads Arthurs quotes.

Thanks HIT27 for the video.
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

AShortt wrote:
I luv the Hammer OHP, I don't like the handles of the pulldown but the feel of the move is decent (all the hammer is nice and smooth). I think he should have gotten more of a stretch and pre downward shrug each rep.

As well I don't usually support the use of abs at the bottom where he crunches into it I'd rather see chest up and shoulder blades squeezing together. Abs can be done in a different set ;n). I dislike the decline press machine but he seems to be built better for it than I. With the Nautilus Row I would have him keeping his shoulders down and relaxing his upper back more.

Possibly but hard to tell form that angle I may have encouraged him to bring elbows in a bit closer. Again shrugging in s recommended in my books. Nice controlled rep cadence though I might have him push a few seconds longer when he stalls.

Husky guys do good on this type of training but I'd bet regardless of the weight he adds over time this only maintains him after the first few months.

As always nice to see HIT being performed cleanly and purposefully.

Regards,
Andrew


I agree with having him push it more when he stalls, in fact I think he may have gotten an extra rep on one or two of his sets. Other than that , his form is excellent and no mistaking it for anything other than HIT.
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Joshua Trentine

Ohio, USA

i might be a spoiled elitist jerk but i really have a tough time watching this style of training without the right equipment and thorough inroad technique.

no knock on the effort i just feel the equipment and instruction are sub par.

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Bastion

Joshua Trentine wrote:
i might be a spoiled elitist jerk but i really have a tough time watching this style of training without the right equipment and thorough inroad technique.

no knock on the effort i just feel the equipment and instruction are sub par.

Everyone has, and is entitled to their own opinion and interpretations. However, when is hard enough, hard enough?. In Body By Science Doug Mcguff now thinks that the thorough inroad technique is too much for most.

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Joshua Trentine

Ohio, USA

its not so much about pushing and pulling on the apparatus "hard", its more of a qualitative thing,more internally focused.

my eye tells me its just not getting to the muscles as well as it could.
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spud

Good example of controlled cadence without it being superslow.

What is the thorough inroad technique?

Josh, how is the instruction sub-par? Don't worry about being elitist, it's your opinion, and as others have said, one that you're entitled to have.

As for the poor equipment, they are making the best of what they have available.
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Raider22

Ohio, USA

It's about intensity and overload. The equipment and little things are next to meaningless. People on here seem to worry about the salt and pepper and not the meat and potatoes. You can live on meat and potatoes without salt and pepper, but you cant live on salt and pepper.

This was a very good example of a great training session.

Intensity, systematic progressive overload!! Simple !!
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Techniques like continuing longer in the stalled position maybe creeping through a few more inches are fine. They only inroad too far if you are cheating too much (bracing, using way too much outlying musculature etc). If there is quality mind-muscle connection it is the target which will squeeze and metaphorically bleed out a bit more. A high quality set zero's in on the targeted muscle(s)it doesn't spread out the load.

I have to say though that a good HIT trainer can easily work around the deficiencies of most equipment. I think top quality equipment makes a huge difference but that variety is almost as important.

Regards,
Andrew
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coomo

i cant see that hammer units are not sufficent? my experience with them (most) is that they have formidable strength curves and zero friction.The pressing movements, are every bit as debilitating as comparable nautilus units.
I think you will find that James and Mark, have a range of Nautilus units at their disposal too.
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Benjamin Dover

simon-hecubus wrote:
I disagree about the pushing a bit longer on the stalls part. Menzter indicated that too much statics-against-the-weight time can cause excessive inroading and should be used infrequently and with care.

I have found that too much end-set statics wears me out. Not all of us can take that much "knob turned to 11" stuff all the time. It causes me excess soreness and I DON'T think it pays off in added results equal to the efforts --- especially if your system hasn't recuperated enough between sessions.
______________________________

I know Mark doesn't like coming around here any more, but I was wondering James could tell us what type of progression he had him on for the 5-week period mentioned in the video. Was it 5-lbs/wk or 10-lbs/wk or something different than that?

Regards,
Scott



Hello,

Mark has been using this routine for many, many months. He began dieting for the five week period leading up to the video. He is aiming to compete again later in the year.

Obviously, each machine is progressed on an individual basis - as and when - so to speak. The smallest jump in resistance available to us equates to 2.25lbs (1KG) on the Hammer Strength equipment.

Mark has been training HIT style for 20 plus years on and off, so large jumps in resistance aren't usually possible, 5lbs being the standard.
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ac01

Hi

Just watched this. Great stuff as always involving James @ Empire Fitness. This is a great gym, it a shame it didn't show the extensive range of 1st and 2nd gen nautilus machines. Empire has to have the best range of Nautilus in the UK. James(Trainer shown in the Clip) really knows his stuff, unlikely other so called "nautilus experts" in the UK running gyms who even dont know how to use the equipment never mind the principles. (One such gym owner thought you used the Duo squat by putting your shoulders under the counterweight pads.)
Keep up the great work Empire.
AC
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Ciccio

This is HIT!

Well done, Mark and James!

That said, there's something to Josh's remark. If the speak about FORM, the Bentley-video was a better display.

Best,
Franco
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Landau

Florida, USA

Joshua Trentine wrote:
i might be a spoiled elitist jerk but i really have a tough time watching this style of training without the right equipment and thorough inroad technique.

no knock on the effort i just feel the equipment and instruction are sub par.



Josh: James is actually real good, I find it sometimes comes off as a bit different when you are training "one of the boys."
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

JamesT wrote:
Hello,

Mark has been using this routine for many, many months. He began dieting for the five week period leading up to the video. He is aiming to compete again later in the year.

Obviously, each machine is progressed on an individual basis - as and when - so to speak. The smallest jump in resistance available to us equates to 2.25lbs (1KG) on the Hammer Strength equipment.

Mark has been training HIT style for 20 plus years on and off, so large jumps in resistance aren't usually possible, 5lbs being the standard.


Hi James,

I hope my remarks don't come off wrong, I am not 'there' and thus can't totally judge with any serious degree of accuracy. Furthermore, different trainers take different routes depending based on the individual they are working with (and goals, time frames etc). As well, Mark with so much experience may be holding on to the reigns pretty hard as it were. Additionally, I am sure you have your background/preferences and such and I have mine yadda yadda yadda.

Keep up the great HIT and thank you for taking the time to video this and sharing it, much appreciated.

Regards,
Andrew
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N@tural1

James.

Is the concentric tempo you used here for Mark the tempo you usually use for all clients?
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Benjamin Dover

Joshua Trentine wrote:
i might be a spoiled elitist jerk but i really have a tough time watching this style of training without the right equipment and thorough inroad technique.

no knock on the effort i just feel the equipment and instruction are sub par.



Interesting comments.

Sub par?

Firstly, I would consider most gyms poorly equipped. I think we have a nice range of Hammer Strength and older (original spec.), Nautilus machines available. We don't have tricked Nautilus or MedX equipment available, finances don't allow that kind of investment. You have been spoiled! Take a look at what most people are paying for when they visit a gym or health club.

Secondly, Mark programs and exercises exactly how he sees fit and, as training partners, I support his efforts implicitly. We really wanted to move away from the technicalities that can creep into HIT, and focus on the simplicity of basic progression. Again, take a look at what most people are paying for when they visit a personal trainer.

Whether we like it or not, the masses just don't relate to exotic techniques using rare, expensive equipment. Most can appreciate regular style repetitions performed on readily available equipment. That was the goal of the video:

1. Brevity
2. Simplicity
3. Hard work
4. Progression (future footage)
5. Pace of work/rush factor
6. Non-variation/standardisation
7. Good form

and...

...that an advanced, competitive bodybuilder can become very big, strong and lean using this approach.

I think it's a shame you didn't like it. Thanks for the positive comments everyone else.

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Benjamin Dover

N@tural1 wrote:
James.

Is the concentric tempo you used here for Mark the tempo you usually use for all clients?


No. I don't enforce a particular rep speed across the board. During my workout, I tend to move a little slower but that's just a personal preference (thank you Mr Shortt!!).

When you come to train with us you'll see for yourself. When are you available?
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cmg

AShortt wrote:
I luv the Hammer OHP, I don't like the handles of the pulldown but the feel of the move is decent (all the hammer is nice and smooth). I think he should have gotten more of a stretch and pre downward shrug each rep. As well I don't usually support the use of abs at the bottom where he crunches into it I'd rather see chest up and shoulder blades squeezing together. Abs can be done in a different set ;n). I dislike the decline press machine but he seems to be built better for it than I. With the Nautilus Row I would have him keeping his shoulders down and relaxing his upper back more. Possibly but hard to tell form that angle I may have encouraged him to bring elbows in a bit closer. Again shrugging in s recommended in my books. Nice controlled rep cadence though I might have him push a few seconds longer when he stalls. Husky guys do good on this type of training but I'd bet regardless of the weight he adds over time this only maintains him after the first few months.

As always nice to see HIT being performed cleanly and purposefully.

Regards,
Andrew



Hello Andrew,

Why do you think a few months and he is done progressing?

Thanks,

Ron
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cmg

Great video - very impressive results!! I hope to see more of his training and results.

Thank you!

Ron
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cmg

JamesT wrote:
Joshua Trentine wrote:
i might be a spoiled elitist jerk but i really have a tough time watching this style of training without the right equipment and thorough inroad technique.

no knock on the effort i just feel the equipment and instruction are sub par.



Interesting comments.

Sub par?

Firstly, I would consider most gyms poorly equipped. I think we have a nice range of Hammer Strength and older (original spec.), Nautilus machines available. We don't have tricked Nautilus or MedX equipment available, finances don't allow that kind of investment. You have been spoiled! Take a look at what most people are paying for when they visit a gym or health club.

Secondly, Mark programs and exercises exactly how he sees fit and, as training partners, I support his efforts implicitly. We really wanted to move away from the technicalities that can creep into HIT, and focus on the simplicity of basic progression. Again, take a look at what most people are paying for when they visit a personal trainer.

Whether we like it or not, the masses just don't relate to exotic techniques using rare, expensive equipment. Most can appreciate regular style repetitions performed on readily available equipment. That was the goal of the video:

1. Brevity
2. Simplicity
3. Hard work
4. Progression (future footage)
5. Pace of work/rush factor
6. Non-variation/standardisation
7. Good form

and...

...that an advanced, competitive bodybuilder can become very big, strong and lean using this approach.

I think it's a shame you didn't like it. Thanks for the positive comments everyone else.



Very nicely done. I would be curious on how close he comes to his condition/size on this type of routine. Did he train HIT before when he use to compete?

Thank you for the great post!!

Ron

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Benjamin Dover

cmg wrote:
Very nicely done. I would be curious on how close he comes to his condition/size on this type of routine. Did he train HIT before when he use to compete?

Thank you for the great post!!

Ron



Mark has trained using HIT for many, many years. He was heavily influenced by Ken Leistner, and his training was based on Dr Ken's routines whilst competing throughout the late 1980's. His last show was in 2005. I'm sure he'll post when he sees the footage has made it over here.

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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

Joshua Trentine wrote:
i might be a spoiled elitist jerk but i really have a tough time watching this style of training without the right equipment and thorough inroad technique.

no knock on the effort i just feel the equipment and instruction are sub par.



What is wrong with Hammer ?
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