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A Visit with Kim Wood
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Ellington Darden

From July 26-July 29, 2009, Jim Flanagan and I visited Kim Wood at his home in Cincinnati, Ohio.

As many of you know, Kim was the strength-training coach of the Cincinnati Bengals for 30 years. He was also an owner of the Nautilus Midwest distributorship. In 1989, Pete Brown, Gary Jones, and Kim started Hammer Strength.

For three days and nights . . . Kim, Jim, and I talked almost nonstop about the past, present, and future of strength training. It was a GREAT experience.
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Ellington Darden

How would you like to workout in Kim Wood's one-of-a-kind gym?
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Wow, please tell me this isn't all you're going to say about the meeting of the minds ;n)

BTW you're looking great Sir.

Regards,
Andrew
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johnbhoy

Armed Forces - Europe

Ellington Darden wrote:
How would you like to workout in Kim Woods' one-of-a-kind gym?


Those ball shaped barbells, are they solid or hollow and filled with something?

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Marc1000

I would loved to have been a fly on the wall at that meeting.

When Kim participated on this forum he had some great insights. He would often challenge people to think rather than just provide an easy answer.

Marc
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Ellington Darden

The large globe-shaped barbells are hollow and were made to be filled with shot.

Some of the smaller versions, such as the green one -- up top and in the center -- have tapered-edge iron plates to fit the insides of the globes. They were manufactured in the early 1900s by the Milo Barbell Company.

Ellington
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Hitit

Man to work out there would be one thing, I even just love to go and look around!! LOL

Thanks for sharing that!
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

Ell,

You do look great for 60+ (or any age) and you appear to still have that Dr. Darden V-Shape.
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Hitit

BIO-FORCE wrote:
Ell,

You do look great for 60+ (or any age) and you appear to still have that Dr. Darden V-Shape.


I would like to know what Dr. Darden's workouts look like!



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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Very unique setup. Bet there ins't another one like it in the world.
Dr. Darden you still look great.
Are you training once a week or twice?

Michael
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Waynes

Switzerland

Wow great set up.

Wayne
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Ellington Darden

Thanks for the compliments.

I have four different routines that I perform. They are as follows:

Routine A: Lower Body
1. Leg Curl on Nautilus Nitro
2. Leg Press on Nautilus Nitro
3. Leg Press on Nautilus Nitro
4. Calf Raise on Nautilus Multi Exercise

Routine B: Torso
1. Pullover on Nautilus Nitro
2. Compound Row on Nautilus Nitro
3. Seated Chest Fly on Bowflex Ultimate
4. Chest Press on Nautilus Nitro
5. Shoulder Shrug on Nautilus Multi Exercise
6. Lateral Raise on Bowflex Ultimate

Routine C: Midsection and Neck
1. Stiff-Legged Deadlift on Nautilus Multi Exercise
2. Ab Coaster Stack
Front, Right Side, Left Side, Free Style
3. Front Flexion on Nautilus 4-Way Neck
4. Back Extension on Nautilus 4-Way Neck

Routine D: Arms
1. Seated Triceps Extension on Bowflex Ultimate
2. Biceps Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
3. Wrist Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
4. Reverse Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
5. Ivanko Hand Gripper

I do one set of 8-12 repetitions on most exercises. Sometimes I do higher reps on the Leg Press and Calf Raise. None of my workouts last longer than 15 minutes.

Usually, I'll do two routines on consecutive days, then take off a day or two. It depends on how I feel and what's going on in my life.

Ellington
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s153015

New Brunswick, CAN

Ellington Darden wrote:
Thanks for the compliments.

I have four different routines that I perform. They are as follows:

Routine A: Lower Body
1. Leg Curl on Nautilus Nitro
2. Leg Press on Nautilus Nitro
3. Leg Press on Nautilus Nitro
4. Calf Raise on Nautilus Multi Exercise

Routine B: Torso
1. Pullover on Nautilus Nitro
2. Compound Row on Nautilus Nitro
3. Seated Chest Fly on Bowflex Ultimate
4. Chest Press on Nautilus Nitro
5. Shoulder Shrug on Nautilus Multi Exercise
6. Lateral Raise on Bowflex Ultimate

Routine C: Midsection and Neck
1. Stiff-Legged Deadlift on Nautilus Multi Exercise
2. Ab Coaster Stack
Front, Right Side, Left Side, Free Style
3. Front Flexion on Nautilus 4-Way Neck
4. Back Extension on Nautilus 4-Way Neck

Routine D: Arms
1. Seated Triceps Extension on Bowflex Ultimate
2. Biceps Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
3. Wrist Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
4. Reverse Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
5. Ivanko Hand Gripper

I do one set of 8-12 repetitions on most exercises. Sometimes I do higher reps on the Leg Press and Calf Raise. None of my workouts last longer than 15 minutes.

Usually, I'll do two routines on consecutive days, then take off a day or two. It depends on how I feel and what's going on in my life.

Ellington


Interesting, the man who coined the term "hight intensity training" (correct me if I'm wrong)... for those (pro and con) who say hit is strictly sstf, and consolidation routines... which I believe is one way to go, (the one I use most of the time), but obviously, just because you do the odd second set, bodypart splits, and more frequent training than once a week, doesn't mean you're not doing "hit" (whatever "hit" is)... this is still brief, infrequent and intense, I see here potentially as many as 15 sets per week, but note that of the total 19 sets in all four routines, at least 7-9 would be for small muscle groups. Thanks for posting this. Great to see.
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Waynes

Switzerland

s153015 wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
Thanks for the compliments.

I have four different routines that I perform. They are as follows:

Routine A: Lower Body
1. Leg Curl on Nautilus Nitro
2. Leg Press on Nautilus Nitro
3. Leg Press on Nautilus Nitro
4. Calf Raise on Nautilus Multi Exercise

Routine B: Torso
1. Pullover on Nautilus Nitro
2. Compound Row on Nautilus Nitro
3. Seated Chest Fly on Bowflex Ultimate
4. Chest Press on Nautilus Nitro
5. Shoulder Shrug on Nautilus Multi Exercise
6. Lateral Raise on Bowflex Ultimate

Routine C: Midsection and Neck
1. Stiff-Legged Deadlift on Nautilus Multi Exercise
2. Ab Coaster Stack
Front, Right Side, Left Side, Free Style
3. Front Flexion on Nautilus 4-Way Neck
4. Back Extension on Nautilus 4-Way Neck

Routine D: Arms
1. Seated Triceps Extension on Bowflex Ultimate
2. Biceps Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
3. Wrist Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
4. Reverse Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
5. Ivanko Hand Gripper

I do one set of 8-12 repetitions on most exercises. Sometimes I do higher reps on the Leg Press and Calf Raise. None of my workouts last longer than 15 minutes.

Usually, I'll do two routines on consecutive days, then take off a day or two. It depends on how I feel and what's going on in my life.

Ellington


Interesting, the man who coined the term "hight intensity training" (correct me if I'm wrong)... for those (pro and con) who say hit is strictly sstf, and consolidation routines... which I believe is one way to go, (the one I use most of the time), but obviously, just because you do the odd second set, bodypart splits, and more frequent training than once a week, doesn't mean you're not doing "hit" (whatever "hit" is)... this is still brief, infrequent and intense, I see here potentially as many as 15 sets per week, but note that of the total 19 sets in all four routines, at least 7-9 would be for small muscle groups. Thanks for posting this. Great to see.


Sorry to be a little sarcastic here.

Simple Simon said put your hand on your head.

If Ellington does two sets then you do ??? If Ellington said he did 4 sets fast, would you ???

You would have been better to ask why, than to just do without knowing why.

Lets ask Rick a question, {doubt if he has an answer or will answer} if you do basically one set to failure, in the last two years name all your starting weights, and finishing weights in all lifts. As I have not the time to shrift though your thread.

I never thought of Ellington HIT as SSTF, as at times there have been 7 exercises for one body part, sort of makes you wonder why anybody would have said or thought that SSFT would be productive ??? After the beginners stage ??? Well its NOT.

I thought of Arthurs very last programs as SSTF, but he did do them fast, which is far more progressive than slow. Ellington brought the slow 2/4 in.

Wayne
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Marc1000

Ellington Darden wrote:
Thanks for the compliments.

I have four different routines that I perform. They are as follows:

Routine A: Lower Body
1. Leg Curl on Nautilus Nitro
2. Leg Press on Nautilus Nitro
3. Leg Press on Nautilus Nitro
4. Calf Raise on Nautilus Multi Exercise

Routine B: Torso
1. Pullover on Nautilus Nitro
2. Compound Row on Nautilus Nitro
3. Seated Chest Fly on Bowflex Ultimate
4. Chest Press on Nautilus Nitro
5. Shoulder Shrug on Nautilus Multi Exercise
6. Lateral Raise on Bowflex Ultimate

Routine C: Midsection and Neck
1. Stiff-Legged Deadlift on Nautilus Multi Exercise
2. Ab Coaster Stack
Front, Right Side, Left Side, Free Style
3. Front Flexion on Nautilus 4-Way Neck
4. Back Extension on Nautilus 4-Way Neck

Routine D: Arms
1. Seated Triceps Extension on Bowflex Ultimate
2. Biceps Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
3. Wrist Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
4. Reverse Curl on Thick-Handled Barbell
5. Ivanko Hand Gripper

I do one set of 8-12 repetitions on most exercises. Sometimes I do higher reps on the Leg Press and Calf Raise. None of my workouts last longer than 15 minutes.

Usually, I'll do two routines on consecutive days, then take off a day or two. It depends on how I feel and what's going on in my life.

Ellington


Dr Darden,

You look great. As I get older I am always impressed with an older man with kids who has a good physique. I think of you as a role model.

Are experimenting with split routines because full-body training was too draining? Sometimes I feel really wiped out after a full-body routine. Are you recommending split routines to any of your clients?

Thanks,

Marc
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jmcb

Ellington
I agree with Bio,you still have that v shape that landed you on so many magazine covers in the 70's. Now you have given the self appointed hit police a major problem!
Jim
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Ellington Darden

Guys,

At my age (I'm almost 66), I seldom train to failure. I'm more interested in "just keeping what I have" and I've managed to do so fairly well with the routines and guidelines I listed.

Today, I am not motivated to train like I did in the 1970s and 1980s -- when I was in my 20s, 30s, and 40s.

How I train myself is NOT how I train my clients. I do understand the differences and the WHY.

Ellington

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incrediblechap

Dr. Darden,
Will your next book possibly cover training after the age of 60? is this subject matter covered in one of your other works?
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marcrph

Portugal

Ellington Darden wrote:
Routine B: Torso
1. Pullover on Nautilus Nitro
2. Compound Row on Nautilus Nitro
3. Seated Chest Fly on Bowflex Ultimate
4. Chest Press on Nautilus Nitro
5. Shoulder Shrug on Nautilus Multi Exercise
6. Lateral Raise on Bowflex Ultimate



Thim thar shrugs on the multi can be testy!
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WesH

Ellington Darden wrote:
At my age (I'm almost 66), I seldom train to failure. I'm more interested in "just keeping what I have" and I've managed to do so fairly well with the routines and guidelines I listed.


And it's obviously working for you. You look fantastic.
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cmg

Ellington Darden wrote:
Guys,

At my age (I'm almost 66), I seldom train to failure. I'm more interested in "just keeping what I have" and I've managed to do so fairly well with the routines and guidelines I listed.

Today, I am not motivated to train like I did in the 1970s and 1980s -- when I was in my 20s, 30s, and 40s.

How I train myself is NOT how I train my clients. I do understand the differences and the WHY.

Ellington




You do look great Dr. D. I assume you still advocate full body for everyone trying to gain mass etc.

I believe it was Arthur who said - splitting your workout makes about as much sense as eating or sleeping for half your body.

Regards,

Ron

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Ellington Darden

A longtime reader of this Discussion Forum sent me a private message last night. He was disturbed by my admission that I trained my clients differently than I trained myself.

I replied to him that my goals are different now, than they were when I was 30 years of age. Then, he commented, "But what if your goals were not different? What if you wanted to get into your best-possible shape and enter a bodybuilding contest . . . how would you do that?"

Those are interesting questions . . . and they are worth addressing.

Really, my answers are clearly stated in some of my previous writings on my web site. In my Intensive-Coaching block, under my picture on the opening page, I note that 99% of trainees can NOT train themselves -- at least, not consistently in an all-out manner.

My enter-a-bodybuilding-contest goal would be to add 12 pounds of muscle over a six-month period, or approximately 2 pounds per month.

And believe me, I'd need some strong "pushing" and coaching to achieve that new goal. Therefore, I'd work out a deal with my friends, Jim Flanagan and Ken Hutchins, alternately, to push me through each workout.

Most of the time, I'd plan my own routines and they'd be similar to the ones I have in my book, "The New HIT." I'd start with 10 exercises performed twice a week. There would be an A Routine and a B Routine and both would be whole body.

I'd do those routines, A and B, each once a week, as long as I could before I plateaued on approximately half of the exercises. Then, I'd start reducing slightly the number of exercises . . . and then the frequency, from four times in two weeks to three times in two weeks.

Once a month, I'd throw in a change-of-pace routine. After each six weeks of training, I'd re-evaluate my progress and make adaptations. And after about three months, I'd need to pay serious attention to my dietary calories . . . to make sure my subcutaneous-fat thickness was significantly thinner than it is now.

All of the above is much different than the A, B, C, and D routines that I described earlier. The earlier routines deal in maintenance. The latter ones focus on a serious plan to pack 12 pounds of muscle on the body of a 66-year-old man.

I know what's involved in both situations. I'd much rather stay in a maintenance mode. As I stated previously, "My goals are different now."

Ellington
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s153015

New Brunswick, CAN

Yes, I concur, (that you look amazing) Dr. Darden gives us all something to shoot for as we get older, within the confines of our respective genetics, we can still look forward to looking good for much longer than perhaps previously thought. Strength training is truly as close to the fountain of youth as there is.
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Waynes

Switzerland


You look better than you did on some photo I seen before, looks like you back in training.

Ellington Darden wrote:
A longtime reader of this Discussion Forum sent me a private message last night. He was disturbed by my admission that I trained my clients differently than I trained myself.


Cannot believe that, as there are many different routines to try using HIT.

Ellington Darden wrote:
I replied to him that my goals are different now, than they were when I was 30 years of age. Then, he commented, "But what if your goals were not different? What if you wanted to get into your best-possible shape and enter a bodybuilding contest . . . how would you do that?"

Those are interesting questions . . . and they are worth addressing.

Really, my answers are clearly stated in some of my previous writings on my web site. In my Intensive-Coaching block, under my picture on the opening page, I note that 99% of trainees can NOT train themselves -- at least, not consistently in an all-out manner.

My enter-a-bodybuilding-contest goal would be to add 12 pounds of muscle over a six-month period, or approximately 2 pounds per month.

And believe me, I'd need some strong "pushing" and coaching to achieve that new goal. Therefore, I'd work out a deal with my friends, Jim Flanagan and Ken Hutchins, alternately, to push me through each workout.

Most of the time, I'd plan my own routines and they'd be similar to the ones I have in my book, "The New HIT." I'd start with 10 exercises performed twice a week. There would be an A Routine and a B Routine and both would be whole body.

I'd do those routines, A and B, each once a week, as long as I could before I plateaued on approximately half of the exercises. Then, I'd start reducing slightly the number of exercises . . . and then the frequency, from four times in two weeks to three times in two weeks.

Once a month, I'd throw in a change-of-pace routine. After each six weeks of training, I'd re-evaluate my progress and make adaptations. And after about three months, I'd need to pay serious attention to my dietary calories . . . to make sure my subcutaneous-fat thickness was significantly thinner than it is now.

All of the above is much different than the A, B, C, and D routines that I described earlier. The earlier routines deal in maintenance. The latter ones focus on a serious plan to pack 12 pounds of muscle on the body of a 66-year-old man.

I know what's involved in both situations. I'd much rather stay in a maintenance mode. As I stated previously, "My goals are different now."

Ellington


s153015 wrote:
Yes, I concur, (that you look amazing) Dr. Darden gives us all something to shoot for as we get older, within the confines of our respective genetics, we can still look forward to looking good for much longer than perhaps previously thought. Strength training is truly as close to the fountain of youth as there is.


As we get older ??? Thought you were just over 70 ??? Sorry if I got that wrong.

I have never heard you Rick try to help people here, or get into a debate ??? And when I asked you some questions you seemed baffled ??? I know you will not answer as you have none, you just like to try very badly to insult me, when all I did was help you, but thats up to you, if thats the kind of person you are, no problem, good luck for the comp this year, dieting is soon for you I think.

Wayne
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Hey Ellington,

You look like a million. I can't help but notice that Misters Flannagan and Wood have to "suck it in" when they're standing next to you.
;-)

Interesting maintenance routines, especially the part about 2 days on and only 1 or 2 days off.

As someone intimated, some training ideas for the over 55 or 60 crowd would be a great focus for a new book.

Best,
Scott
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