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Concessions to Age?
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DSears

In a recent post Dr. Darden mentioned that at age 66 his workouts and goals had changed. I'd be interested in hearing from the 50+ crowd about what concessions to age you've made. I'm 53 and still training hard but I've found that I need to back off occasionally for recuperation. My legs especially don't seem to recover quite as fast as they used to. Any thoughts or comments?

Thanks,

David
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

DSears wrote:
In a recent post Dr. Darden mentioned that at age 66 his workouts and goals had changed. I'd be interested in hearing from the 50+ crowd about what concessions to age you've made. I'm 53 and still training hard but I've found that I need to back off occasionally for recuperation. My legs especially don't seem to recover quite as fast as they used to. Any thoughts or comments?

Thanks,

David


===Scott==
I'm 56 and have been training with some form of HIT off and on since I was 15. I don't recover as quickly as I used to for sure but I still train as hard if not harder than ever before and I used to train pretty dang hard. When I get injured it takes forever to heal so I'm extra carefull not to do too many stupid things that might cause an injury. I seemed to gain alot faster when very young as most do but after about the age 30 gains seemed to be stagnant for many a year. Lately I am keeping at it more consistant than in the past so I think that is one reason I might be gaining better now than when I was younger when I would stop and start all the time. Mostly out of frustration from not making any headway. Old pains show up much easier now that in the past. Many years ago I really strained my shoulder trying a stupidly heavy bench press. After the shoulder recovered it didn't bother me for a long time. Now I feel it when I push it too hard.

Scott
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Greg Roseman

Virginia, USA

David,

I just turned 50 and am approaching the best shape I've been in years. I'm currently training once a week with a full body workout consisting of the Matt Bryciski 3x3 type workout. I run through a cycle of leg press, compound row, chest press, or leg press, pulldown, shoulder press. I perform each cycle three times for a total of 9 sets. Each one to failure.

I've done it three times in the past three weeks, and this past sunday was the first time I made it through thinking I'm getting there. In terms of recovery I don't feel much different than I did 15 years ago. I've pretty much trained once a week since then. I've tried training twice a week, or split body parts, but usually felt overtrained, dull and lethargic within a couple of weeks, so I've stayed at once a week.

The only other issue with age is that I have to watch calories more closely, its easier to gain bodyfat and harder to lose. Its taken me since January 2009 to drop 45 pounds and am currently at 195 and am 6'1". Trying to get down to about 180. I consistenly have to stay at the 1600-1800 calorie range to slowly lose fat. In my 30's and early 40's I could consume 2000-2200 calories and lose fat.

Also right now I'm the strongest and largest I've been in my life. The only difference besides less calories is that I'm consuming more protein, about 180 grams, and 130 grams of carbs a day. I think the extra protein has helped. Its purely a subject judgement on my part but it seems to be reflected in strength gains as well as size gains. I've also been working with Dr. Joe, per recommendation of Rick Chartrand, another over 50 HITer, and its been money well spent. Great topic.

thanks

Greg
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WesH

DSears wrote:
I'm 53 and still training hard but I've found that I need to back off occasionally for recuperation. My legs especially don't seem to recover quite as fast as they used to. Any thoughts or comments?


I'm headed for 53 in a couple of months and I've experienced the same phenomenon with the legs. From Feb thru May, I was going 1X a week of the following:

Leg Press
Pullover
Decline Press
Overhead Press
Row
Biceps Curls

I made good progress on the leg strength, but not so well on upper body. I added a second weekly workout in June of the following:

Lateral Side Raise
Arm Cross
Reverse Curls
Ab Crunch
Triceps Ext
Wrist Curls

That worked well enough, so I added leg curls, leg ext, and calf raises in July. That little bit of additional work completely stopped the progress on leg press for six weeks. After deleting the leg ext and leg curl from the "B" day, leg press progress resumed.

So, at least in my case, I've experienced the same slow recovery of the legs after 50.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Greg Roseman wrote:
David,

I just turned 50 and am approaching the best shape I've been in years. I'm currently training once a week with a full body workout consisting of the Matt Bryciski 3x3 type workout. I run through a cycle of leg press, compound row, chest press, or leg press, pulldown, shoulder press. I perform each cycle three times for a total of 9 sets. Each one to failure.


What's your cadence on those 3-rep sets, Greg? SS or something else?

Also, are you using the same weight on each set or dropping down?

Regards,
Scott
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bobj

I am 58yo and have been training HIT for 30 years or so (with some off years). I was always able to push and get stronger when I wanted until about age 54. Now I get slowly weaker every year, despite still working hard. I am guessing my testosterone is dropping or maybe I dont care as much as I used to. Either way, I am strong enough.
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fritz139

I'm 69 years of age, I've been lifting weights since I was 12 years old. I currently train three(3) days a week as hard as I can. I am getting weaker as time goes by but thoroughly enjoy training for its own sake and the many nice guys I've met over the years. I have an extensive home gym but enjoy going to the "Y" at least once or twice a week and "tinkering" with or modifying used exercise machines.

Great thread.
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Greg Roseman

Virginia, USA

Most of my cadence is about 5/5 or 6/6 depending on the movement. I go slow enough to be safe, I don't feel you need to go 10/10. Anyway, I've got to drop the weight after each cycle. For example I'll do 3 reps with 480 lbs on the MedX chest press for the first cycle, then on the second cycle take it down to about 390 and on the last cycle about 300 each time getting 3 to 4 reps.
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davise

I'll be 44 in March (I know some of you will call me a kid haha). I still train extremely hard on one of my two weekly workouts. Things that make me drag are using too many set extenders etc. Good to break past a plateau, but used too often I start regressing.

Microloading seems to help. Diet is extremely important. Sleep ditto. Drinking lots of water helps also. Still making slow progress and enjoying the ride. I enjoy lots of other physical activities beyond HIT, but when I do things like take a 4 day hiking trip slogging 20 miles a day with a 50 pound pack (the pack does get lighter as I eat the food I carry :-) and come back I accept the fact that my workouts will suck for a week or so until I recover. A balanced semi-stress free life seems to help the most.
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davise

I'll be 44 in March (I know some of you will call me a kid haha). I still train extremely hard on one of my two weekly workouts. Things that make me drag are using too many set extenders etc. Good to break past a plateau, but used too often I start regressing. Microloading seems to help. Diet is extremely important. Sleep ditto. Drinking lots of water helps also.

Still making slow progress and enjoying the ride. I enjoy lots of other physical activities beyond HIT, but when I do things like take a 4 day hiking trip slogging 20 miles a day with a 50 pound pack (the pack does get lighter as I eat the food I carry :-) and come back I accept the fact that my workouts will suck for a week or so until I recover. A balanced semi-stress free life seems to help the most.
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Hitit

davise wrote:
I'll be 44 in March (I know some of you will call me a kid haha). I still train extremely hard on one of my two weekly workouts. Things that make me drag are using too many set extenders etc. Good to break past a plateau, but used too often I start regressing.

Microloading seems to help. Diet is extremely important. Sleep ditto. Drinking lots of water helps also. Still making slow progress and enjoying the ride. I enjoy lots of other physical activities beyond HIT, but when I do things like take a 4 day hiking trip slogging 20 miles a day with a 50 pound pack (the pack does get lighter as I eat the food I carry :-) and come back I accept the fact that my workouts will suck for a week or so until I recover. A balanced semi-stress free life seems to help the most.


I'll be 42 this month and I'm following your footsteps there with how you described the workouts. From the micro loading to the set extenders usually being too much.

What are your routines looking like?

I hope us "kids" aren't invading this thread! LOL
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Landau

Florida, USA

Now at 52, I find that Having Been able to Experience and Observe for Many Years is Priceless in making the Routine for me Now, Productive. One Major Difference - I Personally NEED MORE VARIETY - Slight Differences in Cadence, Order, Apparatus, Sub Protocol - Hard to Explain on Line, but that is what I find works best, or else it can become Stale.
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karma50

Guys,
I'm 59 and turn 60 in Jan.
I've found nutrition is more important than what workout I do, by far. I believe staying lean as you get older is more important for quality of life than what workout you do. Also, sleep is critical to how I feel and perform mentally and physically. Much more critical even than a few years ago.

I've found I can maintain my strength/endurance with one strength workout a week, and general recreational activity. (walking, yard work, etc) most days. I don't like "exercise", as an activity out of my normal life,and have no interest in bodybuilding/weightlifting outside of general health and fitness, but it has helped me maintain my strength as I age.
Griff
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davise

I do a lot of other recreational activities and some self defense training, but for the sake of this board, I'll just list my HIT workout.

A)
Trapbar deadlift
Non-lockout Military Press
Dumbbell Row
Non-lockout Weighted Dips
Curls
Weighted Captains Chair Knee-ins
*Monsterbar Reverse Wrist Curl
*Monsterbar Wrist Curl
* I use tylergrips to make the reverse wrist curl and wrist curl a thick bar which works the fingers as well as the forearms pretty hard.

B)
Non-lockout Full Squat
45 Degree Hyperextension
Non-lockout Incline Dumbbell Press
Weighted Chins
Non-lockout Dumbbell Pullover
Dumbbell Shrugs
One-legged Calf Raise
Ivanko Supergripper

Week 1 A workout to failure and B workout not to failure
Week 2 A workout not to failure and B workout to failure. Not to failure = 2 reps less than to failure workout. I use platemates, fractional plates from Iron Woody Fitness and other magnets to microload. I use a 3/3 or 3/1/3 rep cadence. I rest very little between sets for metabolic conditioning purposes. I generally go up a rep per exercise on both my to failure and not to failure workouts. I like to think of it as coaxing gains instead of forcing them. I'm in this for the long haul. When I plateau for 3 consecutive to failure workouts I'll add some forced reps and negatives to a set to bust through.
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Greg Roseman

Virginia, USA

At age 50 I've come to believe that HIT is an art grounded in science. We use scientific principles and tailor them to the individual. I'm much more influenced these days by Brian Johnston, Andrew Shortt, and Dave Landau. They take HIT principles and tailor it to their own individual needs and the clients they work with.

I've been doing the same thing for years but didn't realize it until recently. These guys all train hard, briefly and infrequently. They spend allot less time than the volume folks. Even Fred Hahn, who've I've heard trains with 15-20 exercises 2-3 times a week still spends less time training than people who don't practice HIT. This ain't comlicated.
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FortCollinsFan

Landau wrote:
Now at 52, I find that Having Been able to Experience and Observe for Many Years is Priceless in making the Routine for me Now, Productive. One Major Difference - I Personally NEED MORE VARIETY - Slight Differences in Cadence, Order, Apparatus, Sub Protocol - Hard to Explain on Line, but that is what I find works best, or else it can become Stale.


A smart reply from an educated trainer.

Landau-Thank You for your Wisdom

FCF
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Hitit

davise wrote:
I do a lot of other recreational activities and some self defense training, but for the sake of this board, I'll just list my HIT workout.

A)
Trapbar deadlift
Non-lockout Military Press
Dumbbell Row
Non-lockout Weighted Dips
Curls
Weighted Captains Chair Knee-ins
*Monsterbar Reverse Wrist Curl
*Monsterbar Wrist Curl
* I use tylergrips to make the reverse wrist curl and wrist curl a thick bar which works the fingers as well as the forearms pretty hard.

B)
Non-lockout Full Squat
45 Degree Hyperextension
Non-lockout Incline Dumbbell Press
Weighted Chins
Non-lockout Dumbbell Pullover
Dumbbell Shrugs
One-legged Calf Raise
Ivanko Supergripper

Week 1 A workout to failure and B workout not to failure
Week 2 A workout not to failure and B workout to failure. Not to failure = 2 reps less than to failure workout. I use platemates, fractional plates from Iron Woody Fitness and other magnets to microload. I use a 3/3 or 3/1/3 rep cadence. I rest very little between sets for metabolic conditioning purposes. I generally go up a rep per exercise on both my to failure and not to failure workouts. I like to think of it as coaxing gains instead of forcing them. I'm in this for the long haul. When I plateau for 3 consecutive to failure workouts I'll add some forced reps and negatives to a set to bust through.


Our workouts are very similar, I appreciate your sharing. I don't do the NTF routines however, but I also workout 1.5 days a week instead of 2. It's nice to compare to others of close age.
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

At age 44, my main concession to the aging process is longer TUT times and somewhat slower rep-speeds.

At about age 40, I found my joints and connective tissues were no longer liking lifting the whole stack on Nautilus machines.

I remain open-minded to the idea of using even slower rep-speeds, but at this time I see little benefit of very slow rep speeds over reasonably slow rep speeds in the 15 rep range.

For legs I no longer go below 20 reps, and often work in the 30 to 50 rep range. I am working toward being able to squat half my bodyweight for 100 reps.

I no longer "push the limits" in terms of pure strength, but am enjoying the new challenge of exploring the limits of muscular strength-endurance.

Even Dante of DC training fame, says lifters over age 40 should never go below 12 reps.

I have lost ZERO size since switching to higher reps. In fact, my legs have grown more this year than in the past decade. And I've gone from about 197 to 205, with no increase in waist size.
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southbeach

Amazing the # of old timers we have here. Does wisdom come with age? :D
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oldwarhorse

Fritz comes to train at my house too.He trains harder than anyone would imagine.He also has tremendous knowledge. He taught us some new forearm tricks this morning that really worked great.He is a lot of fun to have around.
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

southbeach wrote:
Amazing the # of old timers we have here. Does wisdom come with age? :D


You had better hope so.

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oldemettle

California, USA

At 62 one brief and intense workout mostly on machines once or twice a week. Usually one set with negatives and sometimes 15,8 & 3 reps. I also practice Aikido weekly, which is not about strength, but alignment and skill.
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oldemettle

California, USA

At 62 - once or twice weekly brief workouts - usually one set and negatives and sometimes the 15,8 and 3 scheme. I also practice Aikido for alignment and skill weekly.
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coomo

southbeach wrote:
Amazing the # of old timers we have here. Does wisdom come with age? :D


Apparently not.Do you REALLY need an example?
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overfiftylifter

I am presently 56 years old. Several years ago after many years of HIT type training, joint pain and inflammation became a problem. Using heavier loads at the 80% of 1RM was becoming impossible.

I know for many the use of SuperSlow or Slow Burn has worked successfully with orthopaedic problems. It did not work well for my physiology. The slow movement with heavier loads seemed to worsen the condition and I noticed some loss of precious muscle mass. Perhaps the use of Medx type equipment would have made a difference. Also having a trainer such as Fred Hahn or Drew Baye would have yielded different results. The gym I went to at that time had Hammer, Cybex and Life Fitness.

I searched for a training program that would preserve or increase hypertrophy that used lower loads and provide better general conditioning. I had some experience with 21's and had patients who were weight training use this technique with great success. Some had muscular gains that were surprising. It did have me questioning the need for heavy loads. I started to use some of Vince Gironda's more volume programs which required lower loads with some success.

I later came upon some information by Dr. Ron Laura who had a different approach with the use of lower loads.He had written many books including three which were focused on weight training. After reading the first book, "Matrix Principles" which he made the case for his training theories, I began the program. The lower load training using 30-40% of 1RM with different inertia points,isometric holds and longer TUL has preserved and actually increased muscle mass, improved general conditioning and seems to have been therapeutic to my orthopaedic problems.

Overfiftylifter-experience of another old lifter with over 40 years under the iron
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