MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
Guys Who Just Lift
Author
Rating
Options

SteveHIT

GUYS WHO JUST LIFT - By Bob Whelan

These guys don't just talk about training, read about it, write on the internet about it, or make excuses about why they can't do it. They just lift. These guys are the backbone of the Iron Game. They are the passion and the beauty of modern strength training. These guys are my brothers. Guys who work hard, sweat buckets, and move great poundages regularly and diligently in the icy cold garages of New England, in the barns of Iowa, or in the basements of London.

These are regular guys who train with a tenacity and dedication that is anything but regular. They do this because they love it. They believe in it. It is almost spiritual to them. They get no money, fame or glory for it. No one is making them do it; they just do it for themselves. They love getting stronger but would never dream of taking steroids to gain strength.

They just love to train hard and stretch their natural physical capacity to the limit. They live their life by the sacred code of our physical culture forefathers -- the code of GOOD HEALTH, STRENGTH, and DEDICATION, not the latest megahype gimmick.

I am talking about guys like Jon Schultheis of Keansburg, New Jersey, who is one of the strongest guys that you have probably never heard of. Jon has come down to train with me a few times, and I've put him through some brutal workouts. He loves to train hard. So does Jim Duggan of Seaford, New York, who can bench press over 400 pounds for several reps with a 3" bar! (Jim is one of the best natural lifters of all time.) Guys like Paul Condron of Manchester, England, who does regular farmers walks with 120 pound bells, going uphill for about 1/4 mile, or Lowell Boisen of Sioux City, Iowa, who is 65 years young and does regular power rack training, outside, including partial deadlifts with over 500 pounds!

There are many more guys like them, and I wish I could mention them all. They all deserve some recognition. Guys like these define what strength training is all about. The pure love of training. The brotherhood of iron. We all share this common goal and common bond that unites us. Passion for natural strength and hard training. Iron Nation is the brotherhood of Iron, Strength and Hard Work. All are welcome if they are willing to pay the price. Race, religion, political or nationality don't matter when you are battling iron. Citizenship to this nation requires only EFFORT and DOING, not excuses and theorizing.

You earn respect only by DOING. Not talking. Nothing turns me off more than a so-called expert who does not even train. There are so many of them. Many conferences and seminars are given by guys with 12-inch necks! It's incredible! These are the types of guys who usually spend hours each day on the internet arguing about strength training philosophy. They love to attack or put down others but would never have the balls to say it to their faces. They hide behind the computer screen, usually thousands of miles away using a phony name. The funny thing is that many if not most of these guys do not train and are ashamed to be seen.

Many of the PhD researcher types also fall into this category. They can talk forever about the human physiological response to strength training. However, they know nothing about real world strength training because they don't do it.

Respect is earned by doing, but it's not just how much you life that earns respect. It's about EFFORT. It's the guys who just lift that make brotherhood and good will come naturally. They are willing to put forth the effort and dedication that earns respect and promotes camaraderie. It's hard not to like a guy who works his ass off! It's hard not to respect a coach who works your ass off. Even a beginner who is not strong will be respected and liked if he works hard. People who train hard themselves usually respect others who train hard. They respect hard work because they do it. They know how it feels! They understand how tough it is. It's usually the pencil-neck type, who doesn't train hard himself, who loves to foster ill will and argue about minor issues (not load related). In fact, load (or poundage) is the last thing these guys want to talk about. They are more comfortable typing pages of excuses on the internet than getting themselves under the squat rack.

To all these geek types, here is some simple advice: SHUT-UP AND LIFT!
Open User Options Menu

Nwlifter

Even though I myself love to talk about it, love to hypothesize, and all that crap, I agree with what Bob is saying.

Side note, isn't it ironic to post a written article on a message board saying we need to quit talking about lifting and just do it? lol
Open User Options Menu

SteveHIT

Nwlifter wrote:
Side note, isn't it ironic to post a written article on a message board saying we need to quit talking about lifting and just do it? lol


He says they "don't just talk about training" and "Nothing turns me off more than a so-called expert who does not even train."

Theres a couple of people here that are more caught up in the minor details and bullshit than training hard. (if they even train)

It wasnt aimed at you, Im glad you and Douglis are keeping Wayne occupied. LOL!
Open User Options Menu

RX Exercise

North Carolina, USA

Great Post!
Open User Options Menu

Nwlifter

Hey Steve,

I didn't think you were aiming it at me, I was just making a joke on how it's funny if you think about things like this on a message board where the whole point is to discuss lifting :)

I do agree with him and you though, experience, and doing it means more then theorizing for sure!



stevehit wrote:
Nwlifter wrote:
Side note, isn't it ironic to post a written article on a message board saying we need to quit talking about lifting and just do it? lol

He says they "don't just talk about training" and "Nothing turns me off more than a so-called expert who does not even train."

Theres a couple of people here that are more caught up in the minor details and bullshit than training hard. (if they even train)

It wasnt aimed at you, Im glad you and Douglis are keeping Wayne occupied. LOL!


Open User Options Menu

HSDAD

As one who trains in the "icy cold garages" of Pennsylvania, I can tell you that at night, guys like us dream of toasty, climate controlled Nautilus studios!

I often get a chuckle when folks on this site ponder whether warmups are necessary. When your garage is 25 degrees farenheit, you have to do two warmup sets just to get your hands warm enough to grip the bar on the work set.
Open User Options Menu

southbeach

I prefer the thinking man's approach to training myself. I lift in the gym and talk about it on the boards!
Open User Options Menu

SteveHIT

southbeach wrote:
I lift in the gym


No you dont.

"They love to attack or put down others but would never have the balls to say it to their faces. They hide behind the computer screen, usually thousands of miles away using a phony name. The funny thing is that many if not most of these guys do not train and are ashamed to be seen. "
Open User Options Menu

dhitquinn

stevehit wrote:
southbeach wrote:
I lift in the gym

No you dont.

"They love to attack or put down others but would never have the balls to say it to their faces. They hide behind the computer screen, usually thousands of miles away using a phony name. The funny thing is that many if not most of these guys do not train and are ashamed to be seen. "


7 posts in and no sign of a leg extension anti squat take over this is surely a record ;)
Open User Options Menu

summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

stevehit wrote:
southbeach wrote:
I lift in the gym

No you dont.

"They love to attack or put down others but would never have the balls to say it to their faces. They hide behind the computer screen, usually thousands of miles away using a phony name. The funny thing is that many if not most of these guys do not train and are ashamed to be seen. "


LOL. So true!
Open User Options Menu

Waynes

Switzerland

But this Bob Whelan wrote a lot about it ROL.

Wayne
Open User Options Menu

southbeach

ddhitquinn wrote:
stevehit wrote:
southbeach wrote:
I lift in the gym

No you dont.

"They love to attack or put down others but would never have the balls to say it to their faces. They hide behind the computer screen, usually thousands of miles away using a phony name. The funny thing is that many if not most of these guys do not train and are ashamed to be seen. "

7 posts in and no sign of a leg extension anti squat take over this is surely a record ;)


The proper LEG EXTENSION is one of the hardest exercises in the World, assuming proper form, focus and intensity, ie the BIG three!

The more isolated the muscle and tailored the resistance the harder the exercise, and I firmly believe this! It's a beautiful thing to isolate a muscle and then drive it into the ground with ONE perfectly executed "shot".

That's what everyone should strive for.."more" from "less". More adaptation from less volume. isolation achieves this better.
Open User Options Menu

SteveHIT

southbeach wrote:
The proper LEG EXTENSION is one of the hardest exercises in the World, assuming proper form, focus and intensity, ie the BIG three!

The more isolated the muscle and tailored the resistance the harder the exercise, and I firmly believe this! It's a beautiful thing to isolate a muscle and then drive it into the ground with ONE perfectly executed "shot".

That's what everyone should strive for.."more" from "less". More adaptation from less volume. isolation achieves this better.


Why are your results so shit then?
Open User Options Menu

physcult

southbeach wrote:

That's what everyone should strive for.."more" from "less". More adaptation from less volume. isolation achieves this better.


isolation means more volume - you have to do at least 3 times the amount of volume to equal one exercise. Thats at best 3:1, thats pretty inefficient.
Open User Options Menu

southbeach

physcult wrote:
southbeach wrote:

That's what everyone should strive for.."more" from "less". More adaptation from less volume. isolation achieves this better.

isolation means more volume - you have to do at least 3 times the amount of volume to equal one exercise. Thats at best 3:1, thats pretty inefficient.


Open User Options Menu

southbeach

physcult wrote:
southbeach wrote:

That's what everyone should strive for.."more" from "less". More adaptation from less volume. isolation achieves this better.

isolation means more volume - you have to do at least 3 times the amount of volume to equal one exercise. Thats at best 3:1, thats pretty inefficient.


I'm not sure if last post got thru cause i hit reset by mistake.

By isolation I mean nailing a particular muscle then moving on. the reason you feel the need for 3 or 4 or even 5 sets or more in the squat for instance is because the movement isn't getting the job done on the first "shot".
Open User Options Menu

fbcoach

Nice article Steve. I've read it many times. I remember many times lifting in some of the craziest places (outdoors in a rainstorm outdoors in snow, a very tiny shed, etc.) It's funny, because these have also been some of my best workouts. I always attributed it to the adrenalin dump caused by the extreme conditions and need to get thru it.
Bob also says quite often, it's not the routine or training style, it's what you put into it that makes it work. I couldn't agree more!
Open User Options Menu

SteveHIT

fbcoach wrote:
Bob also says quite often, it's not the routine or training style, it's what you put into it that makes it work. I couldn't agree more!



I agree. although I have to draw the line at replacing compound movements with all isolation, thats complete bullshit.

Although Bob covered this. . .

Isolation exercises are not "bad" to do and using a few of them can be a good ADDITION to your program. Don't get carried away with them, but a set of thick bar curls added to the program or leg curls AFTER SQUATS ARE DONE is ok.

I believe that the CORE foundation of your program should be the big basic compound exercises. That, however, does not mean that you should NEVER do ANY of the isolation exercises. As long as you are not looking for the easy way out and substituting the isolation exercises for the much harder multi joint lifts, using a few of them in addition to your program can be beneficial.
Open User Options Menu
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy