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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
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This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

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Which Lat Routine Worked for You?
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DNAHelix

New York, USA

What always worked for me was:

pullover machine
negative chin-up

or

supinated grip bent over rows

or

dead lift

I am experimenting with the pull-down right now, but seriously coming to a conclusion that weighted negative chin ups would be much better.


What never worked for me:

Seated Rows

Dumbbell Rows

any Hammer Strength Rows
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db144

Deadlift
Stiff Leg Deadlift
barbell Bent Row

d
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HeavyHitter32

Bent over rows have been effective for me, but rather uncomfortable to perform especially as the weights increase.

I'm not so sure on the seated row to be honest. I do them in various cycles, but I'm not sure they are as effective as bent overs.

My next back exercise cycle will be the pulldown, high pull (on machine), and occasional stiff legged deadlifts.
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fbcoach

Deadlifts and Latpulls seem to work best for me. I think this is due more to my form, rather than choice of exercise.
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southbeach

Pullover machine is best lat builder but must know how to get the most from it. How can the deadlift build the lats..the lats action is adduction, extension and internal rotation of the humerous. None of which has to do with the deadlift.
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db144

SB:

Go back to school as you lack information on human anatomy.

d
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db144

SB:

What I find interesting is in other posts you've stated you did Deadlifts in your early lifting days and worked up to a respectable weight. If you had really done that you'd know how well Deadlifts develop the back. Seems you're not being honest once more.

d
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southbeach

db144 wrote:
SB:

What I find interesting is in other posts you've stated you did Deadlifts in your early lifting days and worked up to a respectable weight. If you had really done that you'd know how well Deadlifts develop the back. Seems you're not being honest once more.

d


I never really said that. Deadlifts were part of my routine sometime ago before i switched to machine training exclusively, but i never really got much out of them.

The only way the deadlift may influence lat size is thru the "indirect effect" and as everyone knows this is very weak at best and probably more gym folkore.
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db144

What's folklore is you lifting any respectable weight in any exercise.

You most certainly stated what I posted and recently said you might start using them again. Try to keep you lies straight. I suggest writing them down for reference.

d
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DNAHelix

New York, USA

southbeach wrote:
Pullover machine is best lat builder but must know how to get the most from it. How can the deadlift build the lats..the lats action is adduction, extension and internal rotation of the humerous. None of which has to do with the deadlift.


Strength Training Anatomy by Frederic Delavier offers a different perspective on dead-lifts. According to this book dead-lifts work most of the muscles in your body and especially in the back, dead--lifts work more muscle than other isolating lat exercises.

If my experience counts as a testimony, I have tried dead-lifts with much success and I am looking forward to my next 6 week training cycle to incorporate them in my routine again.

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southbeach

kulitsa wrote:
southbeach wrote:
Pullover machine is best lat builder but must know how to get the most from it. How can the deadlift build the lats..the lats action is adduction, extension and internal rotation of the humerous. None of which has to do with the deadlift.

Strength Training Anatomy by Frederic Delavier offers a different perspective on dead-lifts. According to this book dead-lifts work most of the muscles in your body and especially in the back, dead--lifts work more muscle than other isolating lat exercises.

If my experience counts as a testimony, I have tried dead-lifts with much success and I am looking forward to my next 6 week training cycle to incorporate them in my routine again.



ok, how? Considering the known action of the lats on the humerus through what mechanism can the deadlift act more efficiently than a machine pullover or a chin? Does the deadlift adduct, extend and internally rotate the humerus?
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db144

kulitsa:

All strength training anatomy books are wrong and SB correct. You'll learn this holds true on many subjects as you interact with him.

d
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db144

Note SB's deflection and the way he addresses his mistakes. Instead of looking into his mistake he'll try to have you explain why you are correct instead of him reviewing a simple weight training anatomy book and saying he was wrong. Classic SB.

d
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southbeach

db144 wrote:
kulitsa:

All strength training anatomy books are wrong and SB correct. You'll learn this holds true on many subjects as you interact with him.

d


The diff b/w you and me is you worship guru w/o question and i question every guru.

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db144

You've figured me out SB. Anatomy has always been taught by gurus and only the gurus. Stop posting your immaturity is showing.


d
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southbeach

db144 wrote:
You've figured me out SB. Anatomy has always been a taught gurus and only the gurus. Stop posting your immaturity is showing.


d


i'm not immature, your immature. Quit dogging me all around this site with your barbs. Let's have a discussion ..you start by explaining how the deadlift is best exercise for every muscle in body. That's absurd surely but that's what you claim.

Why did you want to know which bench press was superior if deadlift is superior.. the action of the lats and pecs is very similar. just deadlift for big bench/pecs??

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db144

kulitsa:

SB is a runner who lifts weights. His experience and comments are meaningless. He's not interested in building his body only staying border line anorexic thin.

d
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db144

Ok SB. You've won another debate/discussion. Go watch your cartoons now so the adults can talk sweetie.

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Al Coleman

Ohio, USA

A proper deadlift requires extremely intense depression of the scapula in order to keep the bar close to the body. This action is no different than "flaring" the lats.

I'm not a big fan of deads for the average person, but for conventional training purposes it does indeed train the lats to a certain degree.

Al
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southbeach

Al Coleman wrote:
A proper deadlift requires extremely intense depression of the scapula in order to keep the bar close to the body. This action is no different than "flaring" the lats.

I'm not a big fan of deads for the average person, but for conventional training purposes it does indeed train the lats to a certain degree.

Al


Thanks for a thoughtful reply.

My reply would be the heavy bar of the deadlift does nor require "active" lat activation to depress the scapula "to keep the bar close to the body".

rather the heavy bar PASSIVELY places the scapula into that depressed position due to it's sheer weight on the humeri.

if you ever deadlited a heavy bar you'd soon realize that it just PULLS on everything into a final position. IOW, it finds its own equilibrium. that is i refer to a HEAVY bar.
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db144

The highest degree of immaturity is when you refuse to admit your wrong and continue trying to prove you're correct.

d
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db144

kulitsa:

Sorry for derailing your thread.

d
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MikaelPR

Pullover machine performed in stages.
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DNAHelix

New York, USA

MikaelPR wrote:
Pullover machine performed in stages.


Sounds interesting! I would appreciate you elaborating further.
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perrymk

One routine I like is:

ab sling pullover
supersetted with
seated cable row

then after a short rest
negative pullup

I usually do a warmup set or two of 3 to 5 reps followed by one work set to failure, usually in the 10 rep range for the pullover and row, maybe 5 rep range for negative pullups.

I've described my ab sling pullover here:
http://www.drdarden.com/...414758&pageNo=2

I work out in my garage. My pulldown machine allows me to quickly go from pullover to seated row.

For me this is rather intense so is only done for short periods, a few weeks or so, before scaling back or rotating to something else.

EDIT:
I sometimes like to do one long (20-40 sec) negative pullup rep instead of several reps.
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