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Positive v. Negative Chins & Dips
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Tony Williams

In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of performing positive versus negative chins and dips?

Thanks for the advice,
Tony

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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Tony Williams wrote:
In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of performing positive versus negative chins and dips?

Thanks for the advice,
Tony



==Scott==
For me negative chins with added weight proved to be to much for my shoulder as I injured it and wasn't able to do chins for at least a year. I won't try them again.
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Joseph Anderson

Tony Williams wrote:
In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of performing positive versus negative chins and dips?

Thanks for the advice,
Tony



Are you asking positive-only vs negative-only??

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karthik2504

Negative chins and dips have to be done with utmost caution. One has to know when to stop. The depth of the negative dips should also be measured. Going too deep with added weights (at a later stage) could prove harmful. The deep inroad when done properly calls for additional recovery.

If done with caution, negative chins and dips could be one of the most productive exercises that one could do. An added benefit could be that they are more productive as the equipment friction is a non issue.

Caution on performance and recovery are important for any exercise. More so for negative only chins and dips.

Adding negative chins & dips to some of my friend's routines has translated to them performing positive chins & dips, where they were not able to do the same initially.

K
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natemason5

Ontario, CAN

As long as we're talking ROM, I won't/can't even do weighted dips anymore. Too much strain on my shoulder. As far as negative chins go...I'd only do them for two reasons.

1) I can't perform multiple reps with my own bodyweight(not the case)

2) My workout frequency is so low that I need the intensity to be ridiculously high...more recovery time.

Nate
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

karthik2504 wrote:
Negative chins and dips have to be done with utmost caution. One has to know when to stop. The depth of the negative dips should also be measured. Going too deep with added weights (at a later stage) could prove harmful. The deep inroad when done properly calls for additional recovery.

If done with caution, negative chins and dips could be one of the most productive exercises that one could do. An added benefit could be that they are more productive as the equipment friction is a non issue.

Caution on performance and recovery are important for any exercise. More so for negative only chins and dips.

Adding negative chins & dips to some of my friend's routines has translated to them performing positive chins & dips, where they were not able to do the same initially.

K


Negative chins and dips have to be done with utmost caution.

==Scott==
The older and more fragile I get the more I try and eliminate exercises where I have to be very careful or I will get hurt like weighted chins, deadlifts and squats. I think this is one reason I see benefit in REN-EX. There may be other and even more faster ways to achieve muscle gains but I think their way you are less likely to injure yourself in the process which in my case of being 59 years old injury takes forever to heal from.
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WesH

karthik2504 wrote:
Adding negative chins & dips to some of my friend's routines has translated to them performing positive chins & dips, where they were not able to do the same initially.


Right. Start them on negative only, then move to 1/2 ROM, finally to normal reps.
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Ciccio

Try isometric(static hold) chins.
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karthik2504

entsminger wrote:
karthik2504 wrote:
Negative chins and dips have to be done with utmost caution. One has to know when to stop. The depth of the negative dips should also be measured. Going too deep with added weights (at a later stage) could prove harmful. The deep inroad when done properly calls for additional recovery.

If done with caution, negative chins and dips could be one of the most productive exercises that one could do. An added benefit could be that they are more productive as the equipment friction is a non issue.

Caution on performance and recovery are important for any exercise. More so for negative only chins and dips.

Adding negative chins & dips to some of my friend's routines has translated to them performing positive chins & dips, where they were not able to do the same initially.

K

Negative chins and dips have to be done with utmost caution.

==Scott==
The older and more fragile I get the more I try and eliminate exercises where I have to be very careful or I will get hurt like weighted chins, deadlifts and squats. I think this is one reason I see benefit in REN-EX. There may be other and even more faster ways to achieve muscle gains but I think their way you are less likely to injure yourself in the process which in my case of being 59 years old injury takes forever to heal from.


Scott, I totally agree with you and that's the reason for my stressing utmost caution on these exercises. Safety should be the paramount consideration in the structuring of an exercise program.

One could also look at AJ's views on negative only regarding the depletion it could cause if overused.

http://www.arthurjonesexercise...


K
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Tony Williams

Joseph Anderson wrote:
Tony Williams wrote:
In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of performing positive versus negative chins and dips?

Thanks for the advice,
Tony



Are you asking positive-only vs negative-only??


Joseph,

Not sure I was clear in the original post.

What muscles are worked and not worked when one does only negative chinups vs. only positive chinups in his workout?

And the same question regarding dips.

When I do a negative chin, I hold myself at the top for as long as possible, then I fight to keep from dropping ... a slow decline of usually about a minute.

Same for the dip ... just one ... hold at the top then the struggle to keep from dropping. Rather than a slow lowering on each, it feels more like a struggle to keep from dropping until my muscles completely fail.

Tony
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Tony Williams

Also, in the past, I only experienced shoulder problems when I did chinups with a wide grip and palms facing away from me.

With a narrow grip and palms facing toward me, I have never had any shoulder injuries.

Tony
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HeavyHitter32

Tony Williams wrote:
Also, in the past, I only experienced shoulder problems when I did chinups with a wide grip and palms facing away from me.

With a narrow grip and palms facing toward me, I have never had any shoulder injuries.

Tony


Not too long ago I tried wide grip, palms away pulldowns and noticed they irratated my shoulders just a bit. As a result, I stick with shoulder width, palms up. Admittingly, I can feel my lats work better with the wide grip, but not worth the issue.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Tony Williams wrote:
Also, in the past, I only experienced shoulder problems when I did chinups with a wide grip and palms facing away from me.

With a narrow grip and palms facing toward me, I have never had any shoulder injuries.

Tony


HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Not too long ago I tried wide grip, palms away pulldowns and noticed they irratated my shoulders just a bit. As a result, I stick with shoulder width, palms up. Admittingly, I can feel my lats work better with the wide grip, but not worth the issue.


People do the pronated stuff with way too wide a grip. The grip that is strongest is when your forearms stay very perpendicular to the floor throughout. Any more than that and you're asking for trouble.

The only exception to this are "Y" pulldowns, which are done with cables. You may start wide at the top, but pull the hands towards your body as you come down. The danger and strain come when your still have the wide grip in the contracted position.

I'm sure some of our resident physiologists could explain why better than me.
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Tony Williams

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Tony Williams wrote:
Also, in the past, I only experienced shoulder problems when I did chinups with a wide grip and palms facing away from me.

With a narrow grip and palms facing toward me, I have never had any shoulder injuries.

Tony

Not too long ago I tried wide grip, palms away pulldowns and noticed they irratated my shoulders just a bit. As a result, I stick with shoulder width, palms up. Admittingly, I can feel my lats work better with the wide grip, but not worth the issue.


Yes, that is exactly the sensation I felt with the wide-grip chins although I have not tried them that way for years.

Obviously, with the narrow grip, the biceps come into play aiding the lats, but for many, that is a plus ... not a negative.

Tony

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Tony Williams

Tony Williams wrote:
Joseph Anderson wrote:
Tony Williams wrote:
In your opinion, what are the advantages and disadvantages of performing positive versus negative chins and dips?

Thanks for the advice,
Tony



Are you asking positive-only vs negative-only??


Joseph,

Not sure I was clear in the original post.

What muscles are worked and not worked when one does only negative chinups vs. only positive chinups in his workout?

And the same question regarding dips.

When I do a negative chin, I hold myself at the top for as long as possible, then I fight to keep from dropping ... a slow decline of usually about a minute.

Same for the dip ... just one ... hold at the top then the struggle to keep from dropping. Rather than a slow lowering on each, it feels more like a struggle to keep from dropping until my muscles completely fail.

Tony


One correction:

From the static hold at the top for the chin to lowering is around 30 seconds rather than a minute as I stated above. I checked my training notebook.

For dips, from the static hold to lowering is about 40 seconds.

Both are without a weight belt, simply bodyweight only.

And both the negative chin and negative dip are done after three deadlift reps.

Tony

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