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Jim Wendler Loving Some Machines and Slower Reps
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sgb2112

http://www.T-Nation.com/...olution_phase_7

Interesting points..

His powerlifting years..

"It was 2003, and I'd been powerlifting for 20 straight years. I was beat to hell. Although most of my injuries occurred before I set foot in Westside, the writing was already on the wall ? and regularly putting 800 pounds on my back certainly wasn't helping things..

Groin: I injured my groin on both sides. It sucked, but I just wrapped it up and dealt with it.

Abdominals: I tore my lower abdominal muscles while squatting. It was perhaps the most painful injury I'd ever had. I also strained both intercostals, twice.

Spine: The following discs are herniated: L4, L5, C4, C5.

Calves: Both torn. Huge indents in each. Looks freaky though.

Knees: Strained the right ACL at least three times, probably more.

Hamstrings: The right's a mess. Tore it so bad it almost needed surgery.

Quads: Pulled the right quad in the early 90's. It was so bad it turned my entire leg black.

Pecs: I've torn both sides at least 20 times, and each tear caused the entire pec to turn black and blue. I also tore the left pec at the tendon and needed surgery to fix it, and tore the right pec in half but opted to skip the surgery.

Shoulders: In the right shoulder I had a torn supraspinatus, bone spurs, and now, arthritis. I had this shoulder cleaned up with the AC shaved down to allow more movement but to no avail. A total replacement is the only option left and this was another big reason for my retirement."

How he now trains..

"I selected movements based on what would work the specific muscle through the greatest rang of motion. In the case of my shoulders, I wanted to basically turn them off when I was training chest. Hence, the one-dimensional movements; it allowed total focus on the target muscle.

I did two or three of the above per muscle group. Each exercise was performed for 2-3 sets of 10-15 reps.

Weights were subordinate to my larger goal, which was to nail the rep speed and range of motion and not pull anything in the process. So it had to be light, yet still heavy enough to allow me to stretch and flex very hard. Each of these positions was held for a 1-2 count.

Since weight wasn't a priority, most of the weights I used were very low. I remember getting my ass kicked by 40-pound dumbbell rows and 90-pound lat pulldowns.

So how did it work?

Within one month, I felt like a million bucks. Virtually everything quit hurting, and my body took on a completely different look. I looked more "jacked." My vascularity had improved, and my muscles were much rounder and fuller. Most importantly, except for the shoulder that still needed replacement, all the other issues were gone!"

"But the biggest change I'd make, even going back to my powerlifting days, would be to throw in a couple sets per body part of these slow tempo, full range of motion exercises."


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MDieguez

That's Dave Tate, not Jim Wendler.
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sgb2112

Yes.

By far the most entertaining writer on T-Nation and I threw in Wendler's name.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

sgb2112 wrote:
Yes.

By far the most entertaining writer on T-Nation and I threw in Wendler's name.


Wendler's in there in the Jersey Shore story. "ILS" --- that cracked me up.

The man is definitely a born storyteller.
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DNAHelix

New York, USA

Every barbell exercise has a benefit to risk ratio. I think the risk would be the highest with the squats and would definitely outweigh the benefits.

I do not do any bb squats and at present I am trying to eliminate all the exercises that place downward weight on my shoulders, squat and calf rise, to be exact.

The only BB exercises I will keep will be deadlift and shrug.

Bench press is another dangerous exercise that does not really guarantee any serious pectoral development, especially the most common variation of it known as a flat bench press.

I think hammer strength seated press is a far better exercise.

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Turpin

sgb2112 wrote:
Yes.

By far the most entertaining writer on T-Nation and I threw in Wendler's name.


So why the f*ck `throw` in Wendlers name ?

Wendler now strongly promotes `raw` lifting and a very good cyclical programme.

T.
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sgb2112

Raw lifting is for those who cannot hang with the big boys, bottom line. Any one of Louie Simmon's lifters could enter a raw show and win with their warm up weights. It's true..it's damn true.

Wendler would be better off not promoting any type of powerlifting since it destroys the body.
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jn6047

sgb2112 wrote:
Raw lifting is for those who cannot hang with the big boys, bottom line. Any one of Louie Simmon's lifters could enter a raw show and win with their warm up weights. It's true..it's


I disagree. Raw lifting is different from equipped lifting, and requires different training. I believe Scott mendelson has the world record for the raw bench at just over 700lbs, I don't think anyone from west side would be warming up with that, lol.

jn6047
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Turpin

sgb2112 wrote:
Raw lifting is for those who cannot hang with the big boys, bottom line. Any one of Louie Simmon's lifters could enter a raw show and win with their warm up weights. It's true..it's damn true.

Wendler would be better off not promoting any type of powerlifting since it destroys the body.


Wendler started lifting `raw` because he felt he was losing `raw` ( real ) strength due to a reliance on support gear to perform the lifts. He WAS one of the `big boys` .

I would disagree with your comment re; Simmons lifters , as most of them have used excessive support gear from the moment they started powerlifting , gear that is otherwise banned in most legit federations ( ie ; double ply/canvas suits most worn with similar double ply briefs beneath , double ply bench shirts , 2.5- 3 metre knee wraps , use of the mono-lift instead of stepping out from the racks etc ) not to mention a squat depth that wouldnt class as a half squat in the IPF meets.

Ed Coan & a real 1019lb IPF squat.
( Single ply suit/no briefs , 2 metre wraps , steps out/set up , real depth/below parallel , and re-racks on completion )

http://www.youtube.com/...feature=related


Chuck Vogelpohl ( a Simmons lifter ), with a supposed world record squat 1000+ lbs , complete with double ply canvas suit , briefs , 3 metre knee wraps , mono-lift ( no walk out/re-rack ) and VERY questionable depth .

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=4ek_UAJbyHc

Yes , powerlifting can/does take its toll on the body . So does tennis ( back , shoulders) , golf ( back ,shoulders ) football ( knees , ankles ) & any other sport & moreso if performed at a high level.

You really don't know much about lifting at all , and it shows in your comments. Stick to playing with your wrestling figurines & trying to smell what the `Rock` is cooking ;)

T.
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sgb2112

The difference is that all those sports pay at the elite level. It is foolish to wreck one's body for literally nothing. An elite eater makes more than your plate head hero's LOL!

sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=6391391

Eating Joey Chestnut Major League Eating 2010 Earnings $218,500
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Turpin

sgb2112 wrote:
The difference is that all those sports pay at the elite level. It is foolish to wreck one's body for literally nothing. An elite eater makes more than your plate head hero's LOL!

sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=6391391

Eating Joey Chestnut Major League Eating 2010 Earnings $218,500


Most sports/past times are played/done for the challenge not for financial gain.
Go ask any golfer , tennis player , rock climber , tri-athlete , bungee jumper ( or yes, powerlifter ) if they would forgo their love of the sport due to the injury one could sustain .... none would !

I think you need to get out & live your life a little , challenge yourself , be the best at what you can be within your field & stop living in that little Ren-EX safety first world you are intent on living in.

T.
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

sgb2112 wrote:
Raw lifting is for those who cannot hang with the big boys, bottom line. Any one of Louie Simmon's lifters could enter a raw show and win with their warm up weights. It's true..it's damn true.

Wendler would be better off not promoting any type of powerlifting since it destroys the body.


This is untrue. There are some awesome raw lifters out there.
Also they would need to get out of the SPF and back into the IPF or WPC where squat depth and bench lockouts actually matter.

Michael

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fbcoach

I'm not exactly sure why anyone would say heavy weight lifting, using perfect form is bad for you, on an HIT training site. I have had a cervical laminectomy and an Intrathecal Spinal Pump placed in my lower back (with a catheter running up my back thru the spinal canal) AND I can still train heavy low-rep sets on the Bench Press and DeadLift using HEAVY weights, without causing me any extra undue pain.

If anything, it has forced me to use impeccable form, which has lead to better strength and muscular progress. As soon as my form breaks down at the end of a training cycle, I know it is time to reset the weights and start a new cycle. I will plan these out 6-12 weeks in advance and will rarely miss a lift (goal). I just have to make sure I don't get too greedy with poundage increases.
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HeavyHitter32

fbcoach wrote:
I'm not exactly sure why anyone would say heavy weight lifting, using perfect form is bad for you, on an HIT training site. I have had a cervical laminectomy and an Intrathecal Spinal Pump placed in my lower back (with a catheter running up my back thru the spinal canal) AND I can still train heavy low-rep sets on the Bench Press and DeadLift using HEAVY weights, without causing me any extra undue pain.

If anything, it has forced me to use impeccable form, which has lead to better strength and muscular progress. As soon as my form breaks down at the end of a training cycle, I know it is time to reset the weights and start a new cycle. I will plan these out 6-12 weeks in advance and will rarely miss a lift (goal). I just have to make sure I don't get too greedy with poundage increases.


That's great and really inspirational with everything you've had to endure.
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fbcoach

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
fbcoach wrote:
I'm not exactly sure why anyone would say heavy weight lifting, using perfect form is bad for you, on an HIT training site. I have had a cervical laminectomy and an Intrathecal Spinal Pump placed in my lower back (with a catheter running up my back thru the spinal canal) AND I can still train heavy low-rep sets on the Bench Press and DeadLift using HEAVY weights, without causing me any extra undue pain.

If anything, it has forced me to use impeccable form, which has lead to better strength and muscular progress. As soon as my form breaks down at the end of a training cycle, I know it is time to reset the weights and start a new cycle. I will plan these out 6-12 weeks in advance and will rarely miss a lift (goal). I just have to make sure I don't get too greedy with poundage increases.

That's great and really inspirational with everything you've had to endure.


Thanks HH. My reference to myself is to point out that if I can do it, I want others to realize they can succeed, as well. I enjoy sharing and discussing training experiences and passing along things I have found that help increase everyone's chances of success.

One of the best lessons I have learned is to end a training cycle when I can no longer execute a perfect rep, without stuttering, for my predermined sets and reps. It is really hard after 6 weeks of training to only increase the weight by 2 lbs, but I have learned that if I continue, my form suffers, and I end up losing strength or causing my body unnecessary pain and frustration. If you think about it, 2 lbs every 6 weeks is approximately a 20lb gain in a year. That may not sound like much to a beginner (and it's not), but since I am 52yrs old and entering middle-age :-)), it is realistic and probable. Being that I Bench Press 320lbs for reps, I could possibly be Benching 400lbs by the time I am 55yrs old. In my case, SLOW and STEADY and LONG-TERM GOALS are sustainable.

Hopefully, these little tidbits of information help others reach their goals. At the very least, others may find something they can modify for their own use to reach their goals.

Again, THANKS HH for the kind words.
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Turpin

fbcoach wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
fbcoach wrote:
I'm not exactly sure why anyone would say heavy weight lifting, using perfect form is bad for you, on an HIT training site. I have had a cervical laminectomy and an Intrathecal Spinal Pump placed in my lower back (with a catheter running up my back thru the spinal canal) AND I can still train heavy low-rep sets on the Bench Press and DeadLift using HEAVY weights, without causing me any extra undue pain.

If anything, it has forced me to use impeccable form, which has lead to better strength and muscular progress. As soon as my form breaks down at the end of a training cycle, I know it is time to reset the weights and start a new cycle. I will plan these out 6-12 weeks in advance and will rarely miss a lift (goal). I just have to make sure I don't get too greedy with poundage increases.

That's great and really inspirational with everything you've had to endure.

Thanks HH. My reference to myself is to point out that if I can do it, I want others to realize they can succeed, as well. I enjoy sharing and discussing training experiences and passing along things I have found that help increase everyone's chances of success.

One of the best lessons I have learned is to end a training cycle when I can no longer execute a perfect rep, without stuttering, for my predermined sets and reps. It is really hard after 6 weeks of training to only increase the weight by 2 lbs, but I have learned that if I continue, my form suffers, and I end up losing strength or causing my body unnecessary pain and frustration. If you think about it, 2 lbs every 6 weeks is approximately a 20lb gain in a year. That may not sound like much to a beginner (and it's not), but since I am 52yrs old and entering middle-age :-)), it is realistic and probable. Being that I Bench Press 320lbs for reps, I could possibly be Benching 400lbs by the time I am 55yrs old. In my case, SLOW and STEADY and LONG-TERM GOALS are sustainable.

Hopefully, these little tidbits of information help others reach their goals. At the very least, others may find something they can modify for their own use to reach their goals.

Again, THANKS HH for the kind words.



Very , very inspirational `Coach` ( seriously )

Best wishes , T.
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fbcoach

Thanks T.,
I do appreciate the sentiments. Like I mentioned, I enjoy sharing and discussing training ideas and experiences.
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skrewdriver

sgb2112 wrote:
Raw lifting is for those who cannot hang with the big boys, bottom line. Any one of Louie Simmon's lifters could enter a raw show and win with their warm up weights. It's true..it's damn true.

Wendler would be better off not promoting any type of powerlifting since it destroys the body.


To use Louie Simmon's and his "lifters" as an example is crazy in of it self seeing how most of them are on so much gear (steroids) that they could enter alot shows and do good. and yes, most of the westside lifters are HEAVLY juiced! Louie admits himself.
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