MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
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Keelan Parham
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

http://tinyurl.com/...gruentexercises

is a supplement to the Congruent Exercise manual, video demonstration of all the exercises in the same order as the book.
No verbal instruction in the video, designed to go with the actual print manual.
Which available at
http://tinyurl.com/CEAmazon

or there's always Anthony Johnson's hour and half video of the same name available free on You Tube.

I'll be using these for the Kindle version in place of the still photos.
A new channel is set up for these and some new material at youtube.com/congruentexercise
New material to include the hip abd/add, hamstrings, neck, and excerpts from the Biomechanics and Weight Training seminars I do for studios and community colleges.
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karthik2504

Awesome. Thanks Bill.
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Tomislav

New York, USA

I highly recommend reading Congruent Exercise; you can read my review here:

http://drdarden.com/...ic.do?id=633928
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

===Scott==
Thanks Bill, your stuff is always well appreciated!!!
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Hitit

Thanks Bill. It is always a privilege to have you around the Forum!

Some of the best information here has come from you and I think we are fortunate that you like to post now and again.

Brian
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hdlifter

Awesome Bill! Great to have the visuals to go along with the written.
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HeavyHitter32

Great stuff.
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southbeach

Don't always agree with your assertions but your generosity can't be argued with!

Thanks Bill !
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Billy's work is always great.

Regards,
Andrew
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marcrph

Portugal

Mr. DeSimone

I would like to hear you thoughts on this matter.

I regards to rowing for the back:

Speculation is that a pronated or supinated grip for rowing makes little difference in biceps recruitment.

With the forearms directly connected to the upper arms, innervation would seem to be similarly from the same source and pathway.

I have noticed my strength goes up in proportion on the Nautilus multi-bicep machine as when my rows on the Nautilus leverage row (with a neutral grip mostly) increase. Doesn't seem to matter much about whether pronation or supination on the NLR.

I noticed you use a neutral grip for rows for the back in your videos.

I am wondering if a neutral grip rowing motion is best. I like the neutral grip with the elbows tucked in which makes the hand rotate outward at full row contraction, much like you forearm gripping exercise.

Could you please comment?

Thanks in advance.

Marc

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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

marcrph wrote:
Mr. DeSimone

I would like to hear you thoughts on this matter.

I regards to rowing for the back:

Speculation is that a pronated or supinated grip for rowing makes little difference in biceps recruitment.

With the forearms directly connected to the upper arms, innervation would seem to be similarly from the same source and pathway.

I have noticed my strength goes up in proportion on the Nautilus multi-bicep machine as when my rows on the Nautilus leverage row (with a neutral grip mostly) increase. Doesn't seem to matter much about whether pronation or supination on the NLR.

I noticed you use a neutral grip for rows for the back in your videos.

I am wondering if a neutral grip rowing motion is best. I like the neutral grip with the elbows tucked in which makes the hand rotate outward at full row contraction, much like you forearm gripping exercise.

Could you please comment?

Thanks in advance.

Marc



As long as the forearm is neutral or slightly supinated, the biceps are positioned near their strongest position.
The old approach of the "fully supinated position" being the strongest for the biceps doesn't hold up, if you compare it to biomechanics.
Palms down, or fully pronated, distinctly puts the biceps at a disadvantage.
Any fixed grip puts the wrists or elbows in a bad position at some point. I prefer a movable grip (cable handles, or "perfect pullups/pushups) so the joints can follow the "path of least resistance".
Neutral grip is probably the next best.
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marcrph

Portugal

Thanks


The "Perfect Pullup" looks like a good idea, combined to the Nautilus leverage row.

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=i7nvMCHH1bw

Could you comment further on keeping the forearm/wrist position in the "best" position for rows? For example, when you grasp the handles of the Freedom trainer in the gripping exercise, your hands seem slightly rotated outward.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

marcrph wrote:
Thanks


The "Perfect Pullup" looks like a good idea, combined to the Nautilus leverage row.

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=i7nvMCHH1bw

Could you comment further on keeping the forearm/wrist position in the "best" position for rows? For example, when you grasp the handles of the Freedom trainer in the gripping exercise, your hands seem slightly rotated outward.


Yes, by not dictating what my hands/wrists do. I don't try to force supination or pronation, just hold on and let the wrist adjust as it needs to.
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marcrph

Portugal

Bill De Simone wrote:
marcrph wrote:
Thanks


The "Perfect Pullup" looks like a good idea, combined to the Nautilus leverage row.

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=i7nvMCHH1bw

Could you comment further on keeping the forearm/wrist position in the "best" position for rows? For example, when you grasp the handles of the Freedom trainer in the gripping exercise, your hands seem slightly rotated outward.

Yes, by not dictating what my hands/wrists do. I don't try to force supination or pronation, just hold on and let the wrist adjust as it needs to.


Thanks,

I have gotten your book, so I am reading carefully.
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

Looking forward to watching these.

Hoping you have a shoulder one up? I'm assuming you're not a big fan of DB lateral raises due to large moment arm at top of movement? Or perhaps traps give a bit of help near top of lateral DB movement, thereby negating the concern over moment arm at top?

I will say I have some shoulder dysfunction (Clicking grinding and pain) due to full-range heavy dips back in the day, and most OH pressing movements cause me pain. But I can do heavy DB laterals with zero pain. So hopefully I'm not living in a fools paradise on that exercise?
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

ALso cool that you use perfect-pullup. I also use them with clients to allow a more natural movement in their wrists. Have not tried the pushup one though...looks too unstable?
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

coachjeff wrote:
Looking forward to watching these.

Hoping you have a shoulder one up? I'm assuming you're not a big fan of DB lateral raises due to large moment arm at top of movement? Or perhaps traps give a bit of help near top of lateral DB movement, thereby negating the concern over moment arm at top?

I will say I have some shoulder dysfunction (Clicking grinding and pain) due to full-range heavy dips back in the day, and most OH pressing movements cause me pain. But I can do heavy DB laterals with zero pain. So hopefully I'm not living in a fools paradise on that exercise?


No shoulder one yet. I used to do f-r-h-d, 30+years ago, under the Mentzer influence of "dip so deep you're tearing your armpits out". Physical therapists used to run up to me "you're going to ruin your elbows doing that". No, you fools, I'm going to ruin my shoulders doing that, I'll ruin my elbows with nose breakers.

No fools paradise. Side raises are kind of contradictory for me, because as you wrote, the misplaced maximum moment arm. But, they do allow the shoulder joint to find the "path of least resistance" i.e. missing internal obstructions, so I prefer them to overhead presses and upright rows.

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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

coachjeff wrote:
ALso cool that you use perfect-pullup. I also use them with clients to allow a more natural movement in their wrists. Have not tried the pushup one though...looks too unstable?


Agreed about the instability. Prefer to use the angled push up handle, as in the Congruent Exercise videos.

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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

Actually finally got around to watching your new video just now, and did notice you including some DB laterals in there.

I can do OH presses, but only with parallel grip and pushing slightly forward, as I seem to recall you recommending. I bought your last book, will also get this one.

By the way, not sure how happy you are with the cut on your book you get, after selling it on Amazon.com...but you might want to read what I think is the best book on self-publishing by a very smart guy named John T Reed. He's both a Westpoint and Harvard MBA, and says he finally learned that self publishing and selling without middlemen was by far the most profitable way to sell his books.

I don't know him, so not shilling for him here. Just really like his stuff.

http://www.johntreed.com/HTWP....

And here's a good article by him on why he does not sell on Amazon...

http://www.johntreed.com/amazo...
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

Also found it very interesting that you do reverse lunges, as those are the ONLY lunge I do with clients.

I view forward lunges as knee wreckers as the forward momentum "terminates" at the knee, whereas in R-Lunges the backwards momentum (Hopefully not TOO much momentum) terminates into the glutes.

I did notice you use low foot-placement on leg press. I'm guessing to emphasize quads...do think many folk's concern over knees travelling close to toes in leg-press or squats is perhaps not as big a deal as some make it out out be?

Promise my last question, and I did just buy your book, so at least I'm a paying customer. (<:
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Marc1000

In your Moment Arm book you list the db bench press as a chest exercise.

In your Congruent Exercise book, you list the push-up and chest press on a machine.

Did you leave out the db bench press in your latest book out of concerns for safety in getting the db's into place?

Thanks,

Marc
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Marc1000 wrote:
In your Moment Arm book you list the db bench press as a chest exercise.

In your Congruent Exercise book, you list the push-up and chest press on a machine.

Did you leave out the db bench press in your latest book out of concerns for safety in getting the db's into place?

Thanks,

Marc

Thanks for being familiar with both.

Not really, it was more a question of not necessarily wanting to repeat the material.
I must, however, not be making a critical point clear enough. The point of each book wasn't, "do only these exercises because I'm the guru". The point was how to manage moment arms, and joint issues, and the exercises were to demonstrate examples of how.
You could use dumbbell presses, in a congruent fashion, just like you could do barbell squats and bench presses. I just think it's easier to manage the safety and joint concerns with the exercises I demonstrated, and if you don't, the consequences could be much more severe with some exercises more than others.


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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

coachjeff wrote:
Also found it very interesting that you do reverse lunges, as those are the ONLY lunge I do with clients.

I view forward lunges as knee wreckers as the forward momentum "terminates" at the knee, whereas in R-Lunges the backwards momentum (Hopefully not TOO much momentum) terminates into the glutes.

I did notice you use low foot-placement on leg press. I'm guessing to emphasize quads...do think many folk's concern over knees travelling close to toes in leg-press or squats is perhaps not as big a deal as some make it out out be?

Promise my last question, and I did just buy your book, so at least I'm a paying customer. (<:


And I appreciate THAT.
Agree about the foot placement. When squatting, if you insist on a perfectly vertical shin, if you have long femurs you almost have to fall on your butt.
With the leg press, the high foot position theoretically would emphasize glutes, except you lock out at the joint angle where the glutes are strongest, making the exercise less than useful.

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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

Agree that perfectly vertical shins are nigh impossible for many in squat...UNLESS...and I know you already know this, but for those who may not...one uses straps as demonstrated here.

arx machine belt squat:

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=lWUWXbvz4BQ

Or perhaps holds onto a bar

Allows you to stick the ole butt back further without falling on it.
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marcrph

Portugal

Mr. DeSimone,

I have a question(s) about trunk extension on pages 56-57 of your current book.

I first want to take the time to thank you for your rather candid explanation of trunk extension therein. I'm sure your forthrightness will be appreciated in some circles while simultaneously being scoffed at by others.

I agree with you that loading the muscles of the spine is easy, not as some state, which would require the use of specialized expensive machines.

Furthermore, as you so state on page 56: "Twisting the spine, and exaggerating or flattening the curves in the spine, while exerting force, or under load, or with excessive repetitions, deforms the discs and strains the muscles, potentially leading to herniations, spasms, arthritis, etc."

A few years ago, I covered this subject, albeit unpopular, to some degree.

http://www.drdarden.com/...424361&pageNo=0

You go on to state at page 56: "and it strongly suggests that the function of these muscles is to prevent motion more so than create it."

I agree again with this assessment of yours, in fact, in high level sprinters, the core muscles main function is to isometrically contract to enable the powerful hip and thigh muscles the ability to perform efficiently.

I am somewhat troubled with your congruent exercise selection for the trunk extension. Dr. Stuart McGill has warned of large pressures with "Superman" back extension-type exercises. The exercise you demonstrate looks eerily similar to this "Superman" exercise. Dr. McGill has repeatedly demonstrated the bird-dog exercise which lessens the forces on the lower spine while simultaneously activating the muscles of the lower back. I think this would be a better congruent exercise for the lower back.

Your thoughts please?

Marc
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