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Exercise and the Brain
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Acerimmer1

Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?
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Tomislav

New York, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?


Ace,
I've read about inversion therapy increasing cognitive function including memory; this is usually inversion via a slant board after training but could include hp's and standing on your hands or gravity boot (iron shoe) exercises.

It looks like some of the arguing centers around training theory conflict (good/interesting) and some is sour grapes; getting angry when another athlete shares a training vid or a results pic. Weightlifting is individual; no ones results reflect on anyone else.
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Hitit

Tomislav wrote:
Acerimmer1 wrote:
Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?

Ace,
I've read about inversion therapy increasing cognitive function including memory; this is usually inversion via a slant board after training but could include hp's and standing on your hands or gravity boot (iron shoe) exercises.

It looks like some of the arguing centers around training theory conflict (good/interesting) and some is sour grapes; getting angry when another athlete shares a training vid or a results pic. Weightlifting is individual; no ones results reflect on anyone else.


I've also heard of people using inversion causing an aneurism. I was told this by a back specialist who told me about his friend Dr. who used them and had a stroke because on it.

Beware.
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HeavyHitter32

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?


I've been doing cardio about 5 days per week (25 min at a time on bike) for the last couple of years. I do have more energy, seems to help with relieving general tension and stress, and good well being. It's also increased my HDL by nearly 20% and lowered my blood pressure. It also has not negatively effected my weight training. All the activity helps too having a job where I am sitting for too much of the day.
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Hitit

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Acerimmer1 wrote:
Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?

I've been doing cardio about 5 days per week (25 min at a time on bike) for the last couple of years. I do have more energy, seems to help with relieving general tension and stress, and good well being. It's also increased my HDL by nearly 20% and lowered my blood pressure. It also has not negatively effected my weight training. All the activity helps too having a job where I am sitting for too much of the day.


I find it difficult to do much strict cardio (other than my 10 minute swims after my WO). What kind of weight WO schedule are you doing? I think you mentioned it before but I forgot.

Brian
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HeavyHitter32

Hitit wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Acerimmer1 wrote:
Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?

I've been doing cardio about 5 days per week (25 min at a time on bike) for the last couple of years. I do have more energy, seems to help with relieving general tension and stress, and good well being. It's also increased my HDL by nearly 20% and lowered my blood pressure. It also has not negatively effected my weight training. All the activity helps too having a job where I am sitting for too much of the day.

I find it difficult to do much strict cardio (other than my 10 minute swims after my WO). What kind of weight WO schedule are you doing? I think you mentioned it before but I forgot.

Brian


I typically weight train three days per week, about every other day: back/chest, legs, delts/arms.

On those days, after the weight training session, I will ride the bike as cardio has been shown to decrease possible artery stiffness that can result from weight training (although more typically from heavy, low rep sets which I don't do). I then do cardio on at least two non-weight training days.

At first, the cardio was incredible boring. However, I got used to it and ride the bike in my computer room watching something on TV. I get the heart rate up to about 115-120 bps tops...get a nice pace going. It's also helped me keep a bit leaner too.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?


I like that last line.

Well activity which elevates blood flow and helps the glandular system work would have obvious benefits no? Feed the brain with greater blood flow and increase glucose uptake in the brain cells. Increased blood flow would help clear stress hormones etc.

I prefer hiking and just walking with my mutts over straight so called cardio but to each their own.

Regards,
Andrew
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Hitit

HeavyHitter32 wrote:

I typically weight train three days per week, about every other day: back/chest, legs, delts/arms.

On those days, after the weight training session, I will ride the bike as cardio has been shown to decrease possible artery stiffness that can result from weight training (although more typically from heavy, low rep sets which I don't do). I then do cardio on at least two non-weight training days.

At first, the cardio was incredible boring. However, I got used to it and ride the bike in my computer room watching something on TV. I get the heart rate up to about 115-120 bps tops...get a nice pace going. It's also helped me keep a bit leaner too.


I seem to remember you are doing HIT type routines? How many exercises are you doing per weight WO?

Thanks.
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HeavyHitter32

Hitit wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:

I typically weight train three days per week, about every other day: back/chest, legs, delts/arms.

On those days, after the weight training session, I will ride the bike as cardio has been shown to decrease possible artery stiffness that can result from weight training (although more typically from heavy, low rep sets which I don't do). I then do cardio on at least two non-weight training days.

At first, the cardio was incredible boring. However, I got used to it and ride the bike in my computer room watching something on TV. I get the heart rate up to about 115-120 bps tops...get a nice pace going. It's also helped me keep a bit leaner too.

I seem to remember you are doing HIT type routines? How many exercises are you doing per weight WO?

Thanks.


In the past, I was doing strict HIT/Heavy Duty routines, but now do routines with slightly less intensity and slightly more volume. Maybe something like 3-4 total sets per muscle, 10-20 reps per set. However, my training also varies too. Sometimes I do halves or thirds too. Typically a couple of exercises per muscle.
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Hitit

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Hitit wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:

I typically weight train three days per week, about every other day: back/chest, legs, delts/arms.

On those days, after the weight training session, I will ride the bike as cardio has been shown to decrease possible artery stiffness that can result from weight training (although more typically from heavy, low rep sets which I don't do). I then do cardio on at least two non-weight training days.

At first, the cardio was incredible boring. However, I got used to it and ride the bike in my computer room watching something on TV. I get the heart rate up to about 115-120 bps tops...get a nice pace going. It's also helped me keep a bit leaner too.

I seem to remember you are doing HIT type routines? How many exercises are you doing per weight WO?

Thanks.

In the past, I was doing strict HIT/Heavy Duty routines, but now do routines with slightly less intensity and slightly more volume. Maybe something like 3-4 total sets per muscle, 10-20 reps per set. However, my training also varies too. Sometimes I do halves or thirds too. Typically a couple of exercises per muscle.


Gotcha, that could explain the difference.

Still making gains or maintaining?
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Mr. Strong

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?




Everybody on every forum is always arguing. Been on lots of different forums about lots of different topics, its the same everywhere.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?


That and the lack of carbs. Not that I have anyone in mind, but have a cookie.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Hi all

I've seen alot of articles online advocating cardio to boost mood, reduce stress, improve memory, etc, etc.

I never read anything suggesting that weight training alone does this. Does anybody know what evidence there is for the articles I read and/or if there have been any scientific studies showing any effect from weight training.

Also could this (no cardio) be why everybody on the forum is always arguing?


John Ratey (?) in Spark suggested cardio over strength training and stretching for brain benefits. If I recall the general idea was the cardio exercise increased overall blood flow and brain blood flow more than the other two.
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HeavyHitter32

Hitit wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Hitit wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:

I typically weight train three days per week, about every other day: back/chest, legs, delts/arms.

On those days, after the weight training session, I will ride the bike as cardio has been shown to decrease possible artery stiffness that can result from weight training (although more typically from heavy, low rep sets which I don't do). I then do cardio on at least two non-weight training days.

At first, the cardio was incredible boring. However, I got used to it and ride the bike in my computer room watching something on TV. I get the heart rate up to about 115-120 bps tops...get a nice pace going. It's also helped me keep a bit leaner too.

I seem to remember you are doing HIT type routines? How many exercises are you doing per weight WO?

Thanks.

In the past, I was doing strict HIT/Heavy Duty routines, but now do routines with slightly less intensity and slightly more volume. Maybe something like 3-4 total sets per muscle, 10-20 reps per set. However, my training also varies too. Sometimes I do halves or thirds too. Typically a couple of exercises per muscle.

Gotcha, that could explain the difference.

Still making gains or maintaining?


I respond better with more volume and frequency (stay fuller and more vascular) and generally feel better with less intensity.
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Acerimmer1

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Hitit wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Hitit wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:

I typically weight train three days per week, about every other day: back/chest, legs, delts/arms.

On those days, after the weight training session, I will ride the bike as cardio has been shown to decrease possible artery stiffness that can result from weight training (although more typically from heavy, low rep sets which I don't do). I then do cardio on at least two non-weight training days.

At first, the cardio was incredible boring. However, I got used to it and ride the bike in my computer room watching something on TV. I get the heart rate up to about 115-120 bps tops...get a nice pace going. It's also helped me keep a bit leaner too.

I seem to remember you are doing HIT type routines? How many exercises are you doing per weight WO?

Thanks.

In the past, I was doing strict HIT/Heavy Duty routines, but now do routines with slightly less intensity and slightly more volume. Maybe something like 3-4 total sets per muscle, 10-20 reps per set. However, my training also varies too. Sometimes I do halves or thirds too. Typically a couple of exercises per muscle.

Gotcha, that could explain the difference.

Still making gains or maintaining?

I respond better with more volume and frequency (stay fuller and more vascular) and generally feel better with less intensity.


I am curious to know did cardio relieve stress over time or did it have a beneficial effect as soon as you implemented it?
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HeavyHitter32

Acerimmer1 wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Hitit wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Hitit wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:

I typically weight train three days per week, about every other day: back/chest, legs, delts/arms.

On those days, after the weight training session, I will ride the bike as cardio has been shown to decrease possible artery stiffness that can result from weight training (although more typically from heavy, low rep sets which I don't do). I then do cardio on at least two non-weight training days.

At first, the cardio was incredible boring. However, I got used to it and ride the bike in my computer room watching something on TV. I get the heart rate up to about 115-120 bps tops...get a nice pace going. It's also helped me keep a bit leaner too.

I seem to remember you are doing HIT type routines? How many exercises are you doing per weight WO?

Thanks.

In the past, I was doing strict HIT/Heavy Duty routines, but now do routines with slightly less intensity and slightly more volume. Maybe something like 3-4 total sets per muscle, 10-20 reps per set. However, my training also varies too. Sometimes I do halves or thirds too. Typically a couple of exercises per muscle.

Gotcha, that could explain the difference.

Still making gains or maintaining?

I respond better with more volume and frequency (stay fuller and more vascular) and generally feel better with less intensity.

I am curious to know did cardio relieve stress over time or did it have a beneficial effect as soon as you implemented it?


After the first few sessions of getting used to the cardio, I noticed almost immediately of the stress relief. My biggest issue at first was my legs were burning from seemingly the lactic acid and new activity. The key is not using too tough of a resistance. As time went on relatively shortly, was clear endorphins or something was being released. My moods afterwards were better. I would feel invigorated.

I mean there were days where I was dragging all day and come home from work - ride the bike for 25 minutes - and feel energetic. It's like it just wakes the body up. Starting off in the morning like this was a good way to kick off the day too.
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Fred F

New Jersey, USA

To Bill's point about Ratey: - I believe he only tested cardio and stretching and made note that strength training could also be beneficial (if I'm remembering correctly but could be wrong on this). I also believe that the cardio and stretching were also beneficial due to the rhythmic movement and that it was something more people could do at any time and daily to improve blood flow.
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WesH

Fred F wrote:
To Bill's point about Ratey: - I believe he only tested cardio and stretching and made note that strength training could also be beneficial (if I'm remembering correctly but could be wrong on this). I also believe that the cardio and stretching were also beneficial due to the rhythmic movement and that it was something more people could do at any time and daily to improve blood flow.


In that case, you'd think a slowish, steady heavy leg press would be plenty rhythmic and move a helluva lot more blood than jogging.
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Acerimmer1

WesH wrote:
Fred F wrote:
To Bill's point about Ratey: - I believe he only tested cardio and stretching and made note that strength training could also be beneficial (if I'm remembering correctly but could be wrong on this). I also believe that the cardio and stretching were also beneficial due to the rhythmic movement and that it was something more people could do at any time and daily to improve blood flow.

In that case, you'd think a slowish, steady heavy leg press would be plenty rhythmic and move a helluva lot more blood than jogging.


A study suggested that weight training with 80% or greater of 1RM has no benefit at all for mood. 60% 1RM however was very effective in this one study.

I think diet is also important, If you are not eating like a horse but you are training with 80% loads to failure and doing any kind of volume expect to feel like crap. If you are doing all this except using low volume then you might either be lucky or instead of overtraining you will eventually overload, which is much worse.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Mr. Strong wrote:
Everybody on every forum is always arguing. Been on lots of different forums about lots of different topics, its the same everywhere.


Reminds me of an old joke from Colin Quinn's Irish Wake bit:

Guy in a bar: 'See that guy sitting over there? I'm pretty he's an alcoholic.

I mean, every time we come in here, there he is."
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Tomislav

New York, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:
I think diet is also important, If you are not eating like a horse but you are training with 80% loads to failure and doing any kind of volume expect to feel like crap. If you are doing all this except using low volume then you might either be lucky or instead of overtraining you will eventually overload, which is much worse.


Ace,
how do you figure low volume leads to overloading unless the athlete is lucky?

Are you suggesting that being too fresh can result in overloading or that deconditioning from too long a break causes it?

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backtrack

Sweating no matter how you achieve it seems to have an overall purging and cleansing effect. Sweating also boosts the immune system and relieves muscle tension. Most gyms have air conditioning systems and fans to prevent this happening.

Obviously it's not useful to have lots of people in a communal place sweating but many people are missing out.

If air conditioning had not been invented most Americans would probably be a lot thinner.

If you think of the benefits saunas are supposed to have and look at in its most basic form, all it does is induce sweating. Cardio has a greater ability to induce sweatiness particularly in a gym environment as its generally very repetitive and performed for duration, but do it in front of a fan and you might not break into a sweat.

When I used to do HIT workouts in my parents garage I was at the mercy of the elements. In winter I hated the cold but felt warmed up after, but not great. In summer I found the humidity of being in there stifling but felt invigorated afterwards.

Also people on here will say inducing cold is better for weight loss bla bla bla. Cold fluid I only find to be good when its hot...staying hydrated is masively important...but try drinking ice cold fluid in the middle of winter. It only seems to induce hunger and slow down metabolism.

And consider this, when your sick, what does the body usually do? Temperature rises and you break into a sweat. It's almost like your body is supercharging your metabolism to fight off the invader whatever it may be. After all a cold body is usually a dead one. The key is to stay hydrated.
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Acerimmer1

Tomislav wrote:
Acerimmer1 wrote:
I think diet is also important, If you are not eating like a horse but you are training with 80% loads to failure and doing any kind of volume expect to feel like crap. If you are doing all this except using low volume then you might either be lucky or instead of overtraining you will eventually overload, which is much worse.

Ace,
how do you figure low volume leads to overloading unless the athlete is lucky?

Are you suggesting that being too fresh can result in overloading or that deconditioning from too long a break causes it?




Well if you are smart and can spot over training then it is not such a bad thing, you can just think of it as feedback. If not you will just go stale.

By training with low volume you are making overtraining more improbable but as a result you are making overloading more probable. If you are training hard enough and your diet or sleep is bad, then given enough time, one of the two scenarios will probably occur eventually.

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