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One Set vs Multiple Set - New Study
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mentzer's boy

Hello,

Recently published a new study in which measurements were taken between 1 set vs. multiple sets, it was a German or Swedish study, which clearly prevailed training on one series.
Anybody got a link to that study?
Thanks.
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HDLou

mentzer's boy wrote:
Hello,

Recently published a new study in which measurements were taken between 1 set vs. multiple sets, it was a German or Swedish study, which clearly prevailed training on one series.
Anybody got a link to that study?
Thanks.


There is a short article about it in the latest MD Magazine. It was actually one drop set vs. three convention sets. The trainees who performed one drop set to failure gained more muscle size and strength than those who performed 3 separate sets.
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

Big surprise... greater inroad in less time. And they invested money and time in that!
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DownUnderLifter

HDLou wrote:
mentzer's boy wrote:
Hello,

Recently published a new study in which measurements were taken between 1 set vs. multiple sets, it was a German or Swedish study, which clearly prevailed training on one series.
Anybody got a link to that study?
Thanks.

There is a short article about it in the latest MD Magazine. It was actually one drop set vs. three convention sets. The trainees who performed one drop set to failure gained more muscle size and strength than those who performed 3 separate sets.

Interesting. So the weight was dropped twice. Do you know by how much? And do you know what
frequency was used?
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HamsFitness

Links or it didn't happen....
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DNAHelix

New York, USA

Brian X 2

Plus, Dorian Yates discovered that drop set trick back in the early 90s and wrote about it extensively.
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HamsFitness

It'd be interesting to see the volume difference, if any, between protocols
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JimBryan

Florida, USA

We were using drop sets in 70 or 71 with Arthur.
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Acerimmer1

Are we talking a drop set or a series of sets in a descending pyramid loading scheme?
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cmg

Please define drop set..

Thank you!

Ron
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NewYorker

New York, USA

http://bjsm.bmj.com/.../e3.60.abstract

Good stuff.

I wish I had access to the study. This is just the abstract.

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Mr. Strong

Is a drop set considered one set?
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

"...One group performed high-intensity training (n=16) and did only one drop-set of each exercise to the point of momentary muscular failure (HIT), whereas the other group (n=14) performed as many repetitions as possible in each set and did three sets of each exercise (3ST)...

Talk about poorly-defined terminology. Geez. I don't know how they can infur anything from their findings.

How many drops did they do? How long were the rests in the 2nd group, which appear to have been taking each set tgo to failure too, or were they?
_____________________

Depending upon how you perform them, a drop set MAY be considered multiple sets, but it's for greater than 1 set (now here I go with the vague terminology).

IF you take each leg to failure, it will obviously cause more inroading than 1 set could ever produce.

To me, drop sets are when you take a set TF or near-F, then drop the weight 10-15% and take that TF or NTF again, then usually a third leg again 10-15% lower. Often a DB rack or stacked machine are the best places to perform this, as very little or no rest is taken between legs.

Scott
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DNAHelix

New York, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:

To me, drop sets are when you take a set TF or near-F, then drop the weight 10-15% and take TF or NTF again, then usually a third leg again 10-15% lower.

Scott


Exactly, with no rest in between.
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NewYorker

New York, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
"...One group performed high-intensity training (n=16) and did only one drop-set of each exercise to the point of momentary muscular failure (HIT), whereas the other group (n=14) performed as many repetitions as possible in each set and did three sets of each exercise (3ST)...

Talk about poorly-defined terminology. Geez. I don't know how they can infur anything from their findings.

How many drops did they do? How long were the rests in the 2nd group, which appear to have been taking each set tgo to failure too, or were they?
_____________________

Depending upon how you perform them, a drop set can be 1 set or more than 1 (now here I go with vague terminology).

IF you take each leg to failure, it will obviously cause more inroading than 1 set.

To me, drop setS are when you take a set TF or near-F, then drop the weight 10-15% and take TF or NTF again, then usually a third leg again 10-15% lower.

Usually a DB rack or stacked machine are the best places to perform this, as little or no rest is taken betwen legs.

Scott


It's an abstract. That is why the details are not provided.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

kulitsa wrote:
simon-hecubus wrote:

To me, drop sets are when you take a set TF or near-F, then drop the weight 10-15% and take TF or NTF again, then usually a third leg again 10-15% lower.

Scott

Exactly, with no rest in between.


We always called them strip sets...used them since highschool.

Regards,
Andrew
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

AShortt wrote:
We always called them strip sets...used them since highschool.

Regards,Andrew


You crazy Canucks!
;-)
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

NewYorker wrote:
It's an abstract. That is why the details are not provided.



simon-hecubus wrote:
But even within the abstract, there are glaring inconsistencies:
"One set of HIT is sufficient to improve muscle mass and strength. On average, results over a training period of ten weeks are better than those of 3ST."

1. No matter how you slice it, a drop set or setS cannot be considered the same as a one set of any exercise.

2. They are also implying that drops sets are the standard HIT protocol, which they are not.

They got the 'abstract' part right, just a different definition than they intended!
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farhad

Massachusetts, USA

The devil is always in the details. Until we get to see the methodology and specific details behind this, take it with a grain of salt.

Most strength training "studies" are worse then worthless, they're misleading.
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DNAHelix

New York, USA

JimBryan wrote:
We were using drop sets in 70 or 71 with Arthur.


Jim,

Would be great if you could share here that valuable experience (seriously). What the routines looked like, what equipment was used, results and what were Arthur's and your own observations? Every little detail, no matter how insignificant it may seem, counts here.

Albert
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
"...One group performed high-intensity training (n=16) and did only one drop-set of each exercise to the point of momentary muscular failure (HIT), whereas the other group (n=14) performed as many repetitions as possible in each set and did three sets of each exercise (3ST)...

Talk about poorly-defined terminology. Geez. I don't know how they can infur anything from their findings.

How many drops did they do? How long were the rests in the 2nd group, which appear to have been taking each set tgo to failure too, or were they?
_____________________

Depending upon how you perform them, a drop set MAY be considered multiple sets, but it's for greater than 1 set (now here I go with the vague terminology).

IF you take each leg to failure, it will obviously cause more inroading than 1 set could ever produce.

To me, drop sets are when you take a set TF or near-F, then drop the weight 10-15% and take that TF or NTF again, then usually a third leg again 10-15% lower. Often a DB rack or stacked machine are the best places to perform this, as very little or no rest is taken between legs.

Scott


===Scott==
I've always considered drop sets to be very effective. Right now they are too effective for my system in that doing them causes me to take forever to recover. If I ever get back into shape again I intend to incorporate them often in my workouts. I enjoy them more than one set to failure workouts.
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HDLou

These types of studies really don't make sense to me anyway, since when it comes to traditional bodybuilding training, people generally perform 3-5 sets of 3-5 exercises per bodypart. Not just one exercise so all that just gets thrown out the window.

I would like to see a study done which compared 3 sets to failure of the same exercise vs. 3 sets to failure performed as 1 set to failure of 3 DIFFERENT exercises for the SAME bodypart. That would be interesting.
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HamsFitness

HDLou wrote:
These types of studies really don't make sense to me anyway, since when it comes to traditional bodybuilding training, people generally perform 3-5 sets of 3-5 exercises per bodypart. Not just one exercise so all that just gets thrown out the window.

I would like to see a study done which compared 3 sets to failure of the same exercise vs. 3 sets to failure performed as 1 set to failure of 3 DIFFERENT exercises for the SAME bodypart. That would be interesting.


It confuses me why this hasn't been done already. I've looked for it but can't find anything like it anywhere.
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