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Force Plate, Impact of Running
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HamsFitness

Thought you guys might like this:

I was recently in a human performance lab to be tested and the results from the force plate were interesting so I put a bit on my blog about it...

http://hamsfitness.com/...ts-dislike-you/

over 2.5 x my bodyweight through my leg on each stride whilst simply walking at speed
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

I did force plate testing of Olympic lifting (with a world caliber lifter), and my findings and graph were identical to that of Arthur Jones'. When this was showed to Olympic lifters, I heard every excuse in the book as to fault with the software I was using, among other things. Funny how I used different equipment and software to Jones, but we get the same plotted graph... same shape!
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HamsFitness

It is an eye opener for most of my clients and although I don't tell them not to run, as we are obviously equipped to handle a certain amount of it, I do tell them the risks and that frequent endurance work is bad for them in the long run.....
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HeavyHitter32

Based on forceplate testing, is this why a full range rep cadence of approximately 2 seconds up and 4 seconds down was recommended for years?
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HamsFitness

I have no idea but I suspect it had something to do with it...the spike in force along with a sudden drop off before the completion of a rep with more explosive styles of lifting
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

The amount of force produced is very low compared to a 2 second positive vs. a slower positive (e.g., 5 seconds up or 10 seconds up). There is negligible difference between the 5 second and 10 second positive. But once you get into explosive and ballistic training, the forces increase significantly.
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

Rumor is that there a group to promote the safest form of running possible, it's called, The Slow Sprinting Guild. Currently, I'm told that they are at an undisclosed location, waiting to emerge to finally correct the mistake The Olympics Committee has allowed to flourish.

Their manifesto is "Olympus Shrugs".
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

They keep tripping over their own feet as they attempt slow turn-arounds during their running gait.
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

That's sounds about right, Brian! :)
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Hitit

So what about walking? Is there too much force in doing allot of that as well?

I know I know qualify "allot". But in general does it have the potential to become an "impact" issue?

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HamsFitness

Hitit wrote:
So what about walking? Is there too much force in doing allot of that as well?

I know I know qualify "allot". But in general does it have the potential to become an "impact" issue?



I have no idea what the long term implications of lots of speed walking would be :) Boredom perhaps.

Obviously we are well equipped at handling and absorbing impact but as always; there are limits to how much and how often.

We each have our different limits
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

Speed walking is hard on the hips... not the knees. In order to increase speed during a walking gait, there is a broader rotation occurring at the hip... as though the hips need to swing out and forward.
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