MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
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Jeff Turner
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Jeanenne Darden
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Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Our old "friend" Joe Anderson has written a treatise explaining why RenEx must part ways with the rest of the HIT community.

His philosophical monologue is filled with humble RenEx one liners like "This may seem disrespectful to those who have forged the path...but I assure you it is not. We honor their contributions by advancing beyond them."

There's much more gobble-gook where he takes ED and AJ to task in various ways and examples. He actually makes some good points about defining exercise and progression, but of course fails to define or in any way describe how RenEx does this any better than other exercise protocols.

Surprise, surprise.

There is one part I whole-heartedly agree with:
"HIT was a step in the right direction at one point in time. However, the advancement of exercise requires a divergent path."

With that in mind, I say: via condios, my darlings. Don't let the door HIT you in the ass on the way out!

Scott
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Landau

Florida, USA

Their "definition" of "exercise" is a Non Objective and Opinionated Statement. This "article" merely splits fine hairs about language and the use of terms in the Exercise Arena. It makes No Difference, such minutia will Not change Anything as far as People are concerned.

The Article is also an Insult to Arthur Jones and represents an Incomplete Comprehension of what Jones eventually discovered - Totally Ommits it and therefore sets a Foundation where the derivatives of which are then Useless.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Hear, hear David. Insulting and unoriginal.

Much of the language about defining Intensity and Progression read as if they could have been cribbed from discussions on this very forum over the last several months --- and given our pals' pseudonymous appearances in various threads lately, they probably were.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

I would like to know how you can diverge from high intensity training...medium, low?

I like to see both sides and there is nothing wrong with arguing definitions or particulars but... where is there a definition of HIT that needs to be diverged from?

I would hope everyone has been building on the Nautilus principles.

Regards,
Andrew
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Our old "friend" Joe Anderson has written a treatise explaining why RenEx must part ways with the rest of the HIT community.

==Scott==
Where is this treatise? Is it on the REN-EX Inner Circle? If so they have chosen to make their forum a pay per view forum in part to rid themselves of doubting thomases from here and to make a buck so who cares what is written on there.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

entsminger wrote:
Where is this treatise? Is it on the REN-EX Inner Circle? If so they have chosen to make their forum a pay per view forum in part to rid themselves of doubting thomases from here and to make a buck so who cares what is written on there.


No, it's on their regular website. I get informed when it's updated. Know your enema and all that.

I can ignore their nuttiness about as well as you've followed your family's advice to avoid this forum, Scotto!
;-)
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sgb2112

"Let?s move exercise forward without pandering to a Bodybuilding audience, without the baggage of the Paleo and Low Carb communities, without mentioning Ayn Rand."

FINALLY.



"HIT seems to promote the belief that ?doing more than last time? is both the stimulus for adaptation and the signal that adaptation occurred. This line of thought promotes the need to ?get more reps? in order to ?add more weight.?

It has always seemed odd to me that HIT prided itself on working harder, not longer; yet the intent of each exercise was an attempt to do more. The measure of ?progress? unfortunately becomes a sign that a subject figured out how to work longer, not harder. This intent and the resulting behaviors are exactly opposite those of proper exercise, yet they are rampant within HIT.

This is not to say that progressive loading is problematic or to be avoided. Rather, progressive loading needs to be distinguished from progression. Whereas progressive loading is a decision, progression is an adaptation; it is a consequence of a stimulus. The decision to progress loads in order to increase exercise demands should not be done haphazardly, nor is it the only means to increasing exercise demands."

TRUE.
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HeavyHitter32

sgb2112 wrote:
"Let?s move exercise forward without pandering to a Bodybuilding audience, without the baggage of the Paleo and Low Carb communities, without mentioning Ayn Rand."

FINALLY.



"HIT seems to promote the belief that ?doing more than last time? is both the stimulus for adaptation and the signal that adaptation occurred. This line of thought promotes the need to ?get more reps? in order to ?add more weight.?

It has always seemed odd to me that HIT prided itself on working harder, not longer; yet the intent of each exercise was an attempt to do more. The measure of ?progress? unfortunately becomes a sign that a subject figured out how to work longer, not harder. This intent and the resulting behaviors are exactly opposite those of proper exercise, yet they are rampant within HIT.

This is not to say that progressive loading is problematic or to be avoided. Rather, progressive loading needs to be distinguished from progression. Whereas progressive loading is a decision, progression is an adaptation; it is a consequence of a stimulus. The decision to progress loads in order to increase exercise demands should not be done haphazardly, nor is it the only means to increasing exercise demands."

TRUE.


I would not equate doing more sets and exercises as being the same as adding a rep or two on an exercise each workout until a certain number is reached (say, 12) before adding weight again - a typical HIT recommendation, for example.

With that said, I agree about the pitfalls off adding more weight and/or reps at the cost of other factors (such as sacrificing form, targeting of the muscle, etc.) For me, it's more of a natural progression, but I am always using the maximum amount of weight and reps possible relative to the application I am performing. Load and reps is all relative in this sense.
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Landau

Florida, USA

sgb2112 wrote:
"Let?s move exercise forward without pandering to a Bodybuilding audience, without the baggage of the Paleo and Low Carb communities, without mentioning Ayn Rand."

FINALLY.



"HIT seems to promote the belief that ?doing more than last time? is both the stimulus for adaptation and the signal that adaptation occurred. This line of thought promotes the need to ?get more reps? in order to ?add more weight.?

It has always seemed odd to me that HIT prided itself on working harder, not longer; yet the intent of each exercise was an attempt to do more. The measure of ?progress? unfortunately becomes a sign that a subject figured out how to work longer, not harder. This intent and the resulting behaviors are exactly opposite those of proper exercise, yet they are rampant within HIT.

This is not to say that progressive loading is problematic or to be avoided. Rather, progressive loading needs to be distinguished from progression. Whereas progressive loading is a decision, progression is an adaptation; it is a consequence of a stimulus. The decision to progress loads in order to increase exercise demands should not be done haphazardly, nor is it the only means to increasing exercise demands."

TRUE.


That Mess is a Promo and I'll mention Ayn Rand anytime I want. She was a Genius. That was a swipe at the Late Mike Mentzer also. Read Capitalism - The Unknown Ideal.
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marcrph

Portugal

It is a good day for HIT!
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

But what you're saying, RenEx, is...
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Made me think of all this...
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WesH

AShortt wrote:
Made me think of all this...


While there may be many paths up the mountain, there are few ways to sell machines.

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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

AShortt wrote:
Made me think of all this...


No argument there, and a very wise quote to be sure.
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farhad

Massachusetts, USA

AShortt wrote:
Made me think of all this...


But some paths lead you to the top of the mountain faster,safer, and with less physical stress than others :)
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Mr. Strong

AShortt wrote:
Made me think of all this...


If you focus too much on the destination you miss out on the journey.
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davise

"Event the mightiest of sharks is helpless in the desert"

"A journey of one thousand miles begins with a single step"

"Even the brightest day ends in darkness"

"A one armed man deals cards slowly"

"Man who goes to bed with itchy butt wakes up with smelly finger"

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davise

"The oldest man who ever lived...died"

That puts everything in perspective, doesn't it?
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
entsminger wrote:
Where is this treatise? Is it on the REN-EX Inner Circle? If so they have chosen to make their forum a pay per view forum in part to rid themselves of doubting thomases from here and to make a buck so who cares what is written on there.

No, it's on their regular website. I get informed when it's updated. Know your enema and all that.

I can ignore their nuttiness about as well as you've followed your family's advice to avoid this forum, Scotto!
;-)


===Scott==
Ha ha, yea, I haven't listened to their advice to well! I have to admit watching their nuttiness and the nuttiness on here is more entertaining than what is said about how to build muscle. It's the same old same old on routines etc and nothing new has been said that hasn't been said a thousand times on here and there but the nuttiness rises to new levels.
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

"I yam what I yam, and that's all that I yam." Popeye, 1944
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

"Wherever you go, there you are."
- Buckaroo Bonzai, 20??
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Tomislav

New York, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
"Wherever you go, there you are."
- Buckaroo Bonzai, 20??


Almost Scott, you've let out the most important part of the quote:

"Be nice because wherever you go, there you are."

Across The Eighth Dimension was awesome SciFi :)
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

farhad wrote:
AShortt wrote:
Made me think of all this...

But some paths lead you to the top of the mountain faster,safer, and with less physical stress than others :)


I think you may have missed the point of the quote...

Regards,
Andrew
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NewYorker

New York, USA

You got to be careful if you don't know where you're going, because you might not get there. ? Yogi Berra
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marcrph

Portugal

Typical RenEx article....

Long on words...short on info.

I amend the last part...No new info.
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