MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
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Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
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Ted Tucker
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Easy Days
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Not Sure

For compliance reasons I'd really like to train with weights m-w-f. I know I can't train hard more than half that often at MOST.

I know that HIT is generally anti easy days but anybody have any ideas they've found useful or think would be useful.

I tried a split briefly but it seemed that just going to failure 3 times per week was too much regardless of split.

I'm a 53 yr old skinny-fat guy trying to get in decent shape. I've started enough times to have a fair idea of what I'm doing but never kept it up long enough for major progress.
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

Don't worry about anything being Anti-HIT... you do what's best for you. I train one week that I would consider moderate (about 8.5 to 9 out of 10 in effort). Then, for the next two weeks, I train moderate to all out (a number of set are sub-failure, whereas a few go to failure), then in week four I take it off completely.

A week off every month... I don't look worse for it and I feel better for it. I train about 25-30% of sets to failure, whereas the others are build-ups... and I don't look worse for it (and, in fact, look better for it). The super intense and sometimes crazy stuff worked better when I was younger, but doing what I'm doing now supports my aging and responses far better.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

I think keeping a regular frequency pattern is a mistake for many reasons. I train more when I can and less when I can't.

Regards,
Andrew
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HeavyHitter32

Agreed, I train when I feel like it and feel well (about 3 days per week). I've never tried taking off one week per month, but that seems like a great idea to really rejuvenate recovery and motivation. I think Gironda recommended this at some point...and perhaps even Mentzer.
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natemason5

Ontario, CAN

A good "easy" day might be a cycle routine of body squats, pushups, and chins(or hanging bbrows if chins too difficult). Do a cycle with no rest, then rest for a minute(or two) then do the cycle again. Try 3-5 cycles...should last about 20-25 minutes or so. It's a good overall workout, and great for your health.

If you're looking to get rid of the extra fat you're going to have to reduce your calories. I've lost 8 pounds in the last 2 months, so I can attest to that!

Nate
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WesH

I understand the desire to stick to a schedule. I think the body responds well to a schedule, especially in the first couple of years of consistent training.

Do what Doc Darden recommends in his books and make the W workout (in MWF) a "not to failure" workout. That is, stop the set one rep short of your failure points in the previous workout.
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

It depends on how you define (describe) "responds well to." Here are two different responses or applications:

1. The body can get used to something and the body will adapt (respond well to) that which is routine, which is not necessarily the best thing when trying to optimize muscle, but it could be very good if trying to optimize lifting ability... two different things.

2. Every person I've ever met always received the best results (even in short bursts) by challenging the muscles in a different way (new equipment, different lifting application or workout, different exercises or angles, etc.)... and altering when training days are and are not can be used as a tool to disrupt homeostasis more than doing that which is usual (after all, we're trying to disrupt homeostasis, and it is a fact that 'that' which the body is not used to will create the biggest disruption).

Having said that, I'm with Andrew when it comes to training and not training, although sometimes I allow my schedule to dictate what I'm doing.

For example, perhaps Tuesday will be my day off, but because of client cancellations or some other factor, I have the morning free, and I will take advantage of that and train body part 'x' rather than waiting for Wednesday. At other times I will train on an 'off' day simply because I feel like it and want to... I'm anxious to do so.

And there are times when it's time to take a week off and I'm glad for it... not that I'm burning out, but because I can focus on other things, whether a hobby or a work project. And there are times when it's my scheduled week off, and I don't feel like it or I may be out of town the following week and so I'll schedule time off then.

Consequently, it becomes a tug of war between when I want to take time off and when I need to take time off. But it all works out in the end. It's called individualism and adjusting training to fit your needs and requirements, as opposed to YOU trying to FIT with a pre-determined schedule.
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JONKILCOYNE

Florida, USA

Brian Hit the nail on the head. Agreed
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natemason5

Ontario, CAN

Brian Johnston wrote:
It depends on how you define (describe) "responds well to." Here are two different responses or applications:

1. The body can get used to something and the body will adapt (respond well to) that which is routine, which is not necessarily the best thing when trying to optimize muscle, but it could be very good if trying to optimize lifting ability... two different things.

2. Every person I've ever met always received the best results (even in short bursts) by challenging the muscles in a different way (new equipment, different lifting application or workout, different exercises or angles, etc.)... and altering when training days are and are not can be used as a tool to disrupt homeostasis more than doing that which is usual (after all, we're trying to disrupt homeostasis, and it is a fact that 'that' which the body is not used to will create the biggest disruption).

Having said that, I'm with Andrew when it comes to training and not training, although sometimes I allow my schedule to dictate what I'm doing.

For example, perhaps Tuesday will be my day off, but because of client cancellations or some other factor, I have the morning free, and I will take advantage of that and train body part 'x' rather than waiting for Wednesday. At other times I will train on an 'off' day simply because I feel like it and want to... I'm anxious to do so.

And there are times when it's time to take a week off and I'm glad for it... not that I'm burning out, but because I can focus on other things, whether a hobby or a work project. And there are times when it's my scheduled week off, and I don't feel like it or I may be out of town the following week and so I'll schedule time off then.

Consequently, it becomes a tug of war between when I want to take time off and when I need to take time off. But it all works out in the end. It's called individualism and adjusting training to fit your needs and requirements, as opposed to YOU trying to FIT with a pre-determined schedule.


Great post...obviously!

Logic at its best.

Nate
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