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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
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New Design for Lat Machine
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

Some have asked what is the best make of PULLOVER, of which I say that they all are lacking, because the reactionary-forces during the travel of the movement-arm causes the lats to be compressed into the seat, made worse by the wider seatbacks that have become the new normal. The ultimate, however, is a pulldown whereby the trainee is seated immediately (or nearly) under the pulley (or pulleys), so that the reactionary-force is nullified, since it's entirely downward. Of course, some attempt to immobilize the hips of the trainee is required, that probably is simple as bolting a generic seatbelt (from a store that sells automobile-parts) to a flat-bench (utility bench) that could still be utilized for other exercises.

NEW DESIGN DESCRIPTION:

This rough diagram (looking overhead) depicts approximate placement of two conventional machines for pulldown, each with a single handle, more like a loop or strap to wrap around the wrist to make the exercises all gripless, instead of a bar or bars..... all unified into one machine by anchoring a bench (or seat) in between the previously separated machines. Three positions are possible to simulate: (1st) the Nautilus Pullover with the travel of the arms of the trainee to be parallel to each other; (2nd) diagonal travel of the arms of the trainee, like the MedX Pullovers, whether the prototype model whereby the arms are more abducted apart than the model that went into wide-scale production; or (3rd) where the two handles are in complete opposition to each other, flush with the shoulders of the trainee that allows for what I coined as the exercise of gripless-pulldown that simulates the vintage Nautilus Machine of Behind-Neck or the currently produced machine by David, of which I believe their makers once called it, "Rotary Lat". By the way, as of today, the www.david.fi website appears to be in disarray, such as some of the machines have either been mislabeled, or somehow management at David believes their machine for gripless-pulddown should be called ?Rowing Torso?.
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g0ld3nuncw

North Carolina, USA

Speaking of new designs, check out this Bi-Tri modification from plate load to pin select.
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backtrack

What about a standing straight arm pulldown? Or as I do them with the arms slightly bent?

Or, seated reverse below pulldown pulley? I like this with the machines that have the roller padding that normally prevents the knees rising upwards. Laying on this pad acts to give some flexibility and stability throughout the movements when sat reversed.

Like with a dumbbell pullover the downside is the legs can come up and almost make you do a backward roll. The other downer is that the housing for the plates probably provides too shorter distance for this movement. I'm pretty sure this does a half decent job of working the lats as I've been able to watch myself do this in the mirror.

Laying at an angle in a seat with padding under the lower back and then maybe some support for the torso at the front then a pad to anchor the feet in, I think would probably make a good machine. A dumbbell pullover/machine pullover hybrid maybe.

Merry Christmas
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

g0ld3nuncw wrote:
Speaking of new designs, check out this Bi-Tri modification from plate load to pin select.


That's terrific how you incorporated what looks to be a weight-stack from a Nautilus Hip & Back, while with this rough view it appears that you kept the integrity of the original Tri/Bi plate-loader by simply adding bolts. I assume that if you wanted to restore the original, all you would have to do is unbolt the weight-stack??
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g0ld3nuncw

North Carolina, USA

Actually this machine isn't mine. It is listed on E Bay currently, just something I haven't seen before. I have often thought of adding a weight stack to mine. I believe your right, it looks like it is from a hip and back.
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

Dan_The_man wrote:
What about a standing straight arm pulldown? Or as I do them with the arms slightly bent?

Or, seated reverse below pulldown pulley? I like this with the machines that have the roller padding that normally prevents.....

Merry Christmas



Dan_The_man,

You reminded me of something that I forgot to mention, that the end of the cables would not be true handles, but loops or straps, that would force trainees to refrain from gripping, since a trainee would enter their hands into the loops to use it as pre-attached wrist-straps.

I have a homemade pullover that I made in this fashion, except I have never owned a machine for pulldown, let alone two pulldowns, so I jimmy-rigged a couple of pulleys recessed into the rafters of my basement's ceiling, then threaded ski-rope through them down to a plated-loading machine. This set-up works much better on my lats than any other device that I have had access to, except from the feel of the two pulleys being shoulder-width, but parallel to each other, I know that what would work better is a diagonal travel like the MedX Pullover, which my arms tend to spread in that fashion that enhances the feel to my lats, except the problem becomes not jumping from the track of the pulley. Believe or not, the softness of the ski-rope is an improvement for smoothness over both cable & Kevlar!

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kurtvf

g0ld3nuncw wrote:
Speaking of new designs, check out this Bi-Tri modification from plate load to pin select.


That is pretty cool. The stack would only raise half way up with a max of 1/2 of the weight stack. (mine has a 200 lb. stack) I don't think the extra friction would be worth it. It would also change the mechanics of the machine. (the arm used to hold the weight plates affects the resistance as it is a lever) I can only imagine what would happen if two people used the machine at once, the stack would be going all over the place....
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perrymk

I posted my home pullover alternative some time ago:
http://www.drdarden.com/...414758&pageNo=2


I suppose it could be altered to more closely mimic your idea (if I understand it correctly) by putting the ab straps on a bar and then rotating the elbows to the side and down instead of to the front and down.




Original post:
I came up with a pullover for those of us without a pullover machine that I have not seen elsewhere. Required is a lat pulldown machine.

Attach two ab slings to the lat pulldown machine. Place elbows in ab sling and assume seated position. With elbows move slings down.

This exercise moves at only one joint (rotator cuff) and I find is effective at isolation of the lats.

I suppose it is similar to a straight arm pushdown but with that exercise there is stress on the elbow.
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crazeeJZ

The best lat machine is the arms and shoulders. In other words, what caused the lats to develop before machines were invented.
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

crazeeJZ wrote:
The best lat machine is the arms and shoulders. In other words, what caused the lats to develop before machines were invented.


The Pullover indeed involves the triceps, deltoids & upper-back muscles, and The Nautilus Behind-Neck affects others musculatures, aside from the lats, albeit not as much as The Pullover..... nevertheless, the hands are among the highest in nerves that removing the grip from the sensation of a trainee during exercises for the lats permits greater focus on the intended musculature, completely apart from Arthur Jones argument of removing grip removes the weak-link preventing failure at the end of a set.

Perhaps it boils down to distraction, that some trainees need more focus than others, or it could be that some trainees are so unaware in their lives that a focus is imposed upon them, like workers or athletes that have such a hunger that they chow down on a big plate of food in front of them that immensely fulfilling, even though the food is bland, compared to someone that goes to a middle-eastern restaurant that enjoys small samples of that style of food on a plate of mezze, or similar situation with foods from Sicily on a plate of really refined antipasto. In my personal life, I've done both and, now that I think about, my training styles changed during those times.
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