MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Lioncourt

Dr. Darden:
I have had a chance to read your new book finally and thought that it was really great. I am currently prepping for bodybuilding shows in July so I can't wait to put the routines to use for building muscle after they are over.

On that note though, all of the transformations you included were overweight individuals that went to lean-ish shape. Likely this is due to not much of the audience buying it being serious bodybuilders. Did anyone in the program in already good shape use it to cut to contest level conditioning? Could you post their transformation here?

I would love to give it a try for prepping for my shows, but am nervous to change too much at once from what I know works for me (traditional full body HIT 2-3x a week).
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Ellington Darden

Did you fail to see the before-and-after photos of Joe Walker on page 88, Shane Poole on page 202, and Truck Brown on page 295? They are all bodybuilders.

Ellington
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HDLou

Dr Darden, Was the Muscle Building Only Program that was mentioned a few times in the book different from the standard program used? More exercises?
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Ellington Darden

A little different. I put more emphasis on negative-only chins and dips. And the trainees did NOT adhere to a reduced-calorie diet.

Ellington
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HDLou

Ellington Darden wrote:
A little different. I put more emphasis on negative-only chins and dips. And the trainees did NOT adhere to a reduced-calorie diet.

Ellington


I think I read somewhere it was a once per week workout frequency instead of starting with twice per week?

Do you plan on a book or e-book on that as a separate program?
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pillarope

HDLou wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
A little different. I put more emphasis on negative-only chins and dips. And the trainees did NOT adhere to a reduced-calorie diet.

Ellington

I think I read somewhere it was a once per week workout frequency instead of starting with twice per week?

Do you plan on a book or e-book on that as a separate program?


I too would be interested in learning more about a muscle building program based upon your latest book.

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dipsrule

Pennsylvania, USA

By the book. Its worth it.
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dipsrule

Pennsylvania, USA

buy that is not by
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Ellington Darden

I'm working on some bodybuilding material now. Generally, my concepts go back to "why negative training works."

I believe the answer relates to the understanding and application of four points:

1. Deeper inroad.

2. Normal positive-negative sets make a 15-25% inroad into a trainee?s starting level of strength, or approximately a 2% inroad during each of 8-12 reps.

3. Negative-accentuated repetitions make a 3% or more inroad per repetition and thus goes much deeper, 30-50%, into a trainee?s starting level of strength.

4. Performed correctly, with no lag time between reps, a trainee reaches positive and negative failure more efficiently in 45-90 seconds.

Ellington
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perrymk

Ellington Darden wrote:
I'm working on some bodybuilding material now.
Ellington


Dr Darden

Along these lines, I would like to ask you some questions that I have brought up on this board in the past and that still interest me.

Is it reasonable to predict how big one can get? I have read books in which it is claimed one can, through measurements of wrists and such, estimate how much muscle / lean mass a person can reasonably expect to achieve (absent the aid of pharmaceuticals). I think Steve Reeves provided charts based on height alone.
My quick check has been that if one can touch the middle finger and thumb when gripping one's wrist, one probably doesn't have the bone structure to get really big. I'm sure there are exceptions and I have no scientific basis for this.

With that in mind, do you think a constant program of negative training is ideal until maximum results are achieved (assuming there is a max)? Or is cycling preferred to give the body a break along the way?

Further, once the predicted max is reached, what is the preferred program to maintain? Or does it really matter?

Years ago when I still worked out in a commercial gym I found myself in the locker with a rather muscular member so I asked him how he got so big. He said just work hard. If you don't see the size in the first couple of years, you probably never will. Now more than 25 years later I never did see the really big size but I have never lost my love of working out.

Thanks
Perry
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Ellington Darden

Perry,

I believe the key factor in building muscular size is the length of the involved muscle bellies. I've explained this in detail in my previous books: For example, The New HIT.

But if any technique will shake your body to new growth, it's the negative-accentuated style that I describe in The Body Fat Breakthrough. Also, what your bodybuilding friend told is generally true: You'll get most of your results in the first two years of training.

Ellington
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pillarope

dipsrule wrote:
By the book. Its worth it.


I agree. I did buy the book, but as the title implies, most of the details relate to fat loss. I am interested in the details of the muscle building case studies and how I can apply same.
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Mr. Strong

perrymk wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
I'm working on some bodybuilding material now.
Ellington


Dr Darden

Along these lines, I would like to ask you some questions that I have brought up on this board in the past and that still interest me.

Is it reasonable to predict how big one can get? I have read books in which it is claimed one can, through measurements of wrists and such, estimate how much muscle / lean mass a person can reasonably expect to achieve (absent the aid of pharmaceuticals). I think Steve Reeves provided charts based on height alone.
My quick check has been that if one can touch the middle finger and thumb when gripping one's wrist, one probably doesn't have the bone structure to get really big. I'm sure there are exceptions and I have no scientific basis for this.

With that in mind, do you think a constant program of negative training is ideal until maximum results are achieved (assuming there is a max)? Or is cycling preferred to give the body a break along the way?

Further, once the predicted max is reached, what is the preferred program to maintain? Or does it really matter?

Years ago when I still worked out in a commercial gym I found myself in the locker with a rather muscular member so I asked him how he got so big. He said just work hard. If you don't see the size in the first couple of years, you probably never will. Now more than 25 years later I never did see the really big size but I have never lost my love of working out.

Thanks
Perry



Maybe the two are linked, by not ever seeing the really big size you kept at it, chasing what you didn't have, which has prevented you from losing your love for working out. Is that big guy still at that level or has he stopped training as he had nowhere to go?
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perrymk

Mr. Strong wrote:
Is that big guy still at that level or has he stopped training as he had nowhere to go?

I have no idea. This was years ago I no longer live in the same town.
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Lioncourt

Ellington Darden wrote:
Did you fail to see the before-and-after photos of Joe Walker on page 88, Shane Poole on page 202, and Truck Brown on page 295? They are all bodybuilders.

Ellington


Thanks for the response and apologies for my delay in responding. I was thinking more in line with people that used the new protocol to get extremely lean that they could step on stage for a competition. Thinking about it more though, applying the 30-30-30 routines with your diet could make results like Hudlow had and the FL waterskiers just as easily and they were plenty lean enough.
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dipsrule

Pennsylvania, USA

pillarope wrote:
dipsrule wrote:
By the book. Its worth it.

I agree. I did buy the book, but as the title implies, most of the details relate to fat loss. I am interested in the details of the muscle building case studies and how I can apply same.


Muscle building is muscle building. You can build Muscle and loose body fat by going by the routines.

If you think you are lean enough you can still use the same routines in the book. You just have to add more calories to try to build more muscle.
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stephnob88

Dr. Darden,

I was wondering if using the Body Fat Breakthrough can be achieved at home?
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Ellington Darden

Yes, absolutely.

I train 15 people per week at my home . . . and I apply all the protocols from the book.

Ellington
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stephnob88

Dr. Darden:

Is it okay if we follow our own diet plan for the six week body fat breakthrough program?
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Ellington Darden

stephnob88 wrote:
Dr. Darden:

Is it okay if we follow our own diet plan for the six week body fat breakthrough program?


Just make sure you are getting adequate carbohydrates. You'll need them for recovery from the negative-accentuated workouts.

Ellington

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DSears

Dr. Darden,

My wife and I just read your book. I've been doing 30-30-30 for awhile and really like the method. She has a question about the diet. Is the calorie requirement the same for a petite woman as for larger women? She's 5-2 and weighs 113 which doesn't sound like a lot but she wants to lower her body fat. In one of your previous books, I think it was the hot hips and fabulous thighs book, the calorie requirements for petite women were a bit lower, something like 1,200, 1,100 and then 1,00.

Thanks,

David
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Ellington Darden

David,

In her case, I think I would go for 1200, 1100, and 1000. Let me know how she progresses?

Ellington
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shinjin

Dr.Darden,

If one has been performing slow protocols for quite some time (10/10), would you recommend increasing the load to perform 30/30/30 given that they already have experience with low momentum training?

Shinjin
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Ellington Darden

shinjin wrote:
Dr.Darden,

If one has been performing slow protocols for quite some time (10/10), would you recommend increasing the load to perform 30/30/30 given that they already have experience with low momentum training?

Shinjin


Good question. I'd say yes . . . slightly. Let me know how you perform?

Ellington

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ldoyen

Really?! Just to clarify... these exercises (8 -10 different exercises one time through or is it more than one rep of 30-30-30) & no additional gym time? I'm trying to wrap my head around NOT being at the gym sweating like a pig for atleast an hour a day 5-6 days per week. (I do have your book & maybe I'm being dense, but only one 30-30-30 push-up, one 30-30-30 squat, etc.???)
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