MB Madaera
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Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
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Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
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Bob Marchesello
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Jeff Turner
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Jeanenne Darden
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Ted Tucker
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Anyone Actually Use Full Body Workouts?
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Nwlifter

At least sometimes?
What's your routine?
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Nwlifter

no one??? wow!
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Frank Scott

I was waiting for Brian
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

99% of my clients. That has to do with finances and time, more than anything. Most people come to me once a week, and so we have to do everything. Sometimes we split emphasis (extra time/sets/effort on some body parts one workout, and then switch it around the next workout). If time and finances were not an issue, I would have some clients on a split routine... not all, just those looking to optimize development.
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Nwlifter

Ah ok, so many do 1 fullbody per week then?

Do you ever use full bodyworkouts yourself, or just splits now a days?

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HeavyHitter32

I have not done full body training in a while and have done well on it in the past, so I was thinking of giving it a go again at least for a few weeks or so. They are demanding, so pacing yourself is important as is exercise rotation and muscle group emphasis. You obviously cannot emphasize all muscles in the same session.
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DNAHelix

New York, USA

I still use full body routines.
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hit4me

Florida, USA

i have been using full body 2 to 3x/week for about a year...started with one set to failure 6 to 8 reps..changed to 15 to 25 reps with reduced weight...for the past 2 months been doing a 3x/week split routine and really don't like it..therefore I am gong back to 3x/week, with a 12 to 15 reps sometimes to failure and sometimes not to failure, depends on how I feel that day
here is the routine:

pullover machine
close grip pulldown
pec deck
chest press
lateral machine
shoulder press
preacher curl machine
triceps extension machine
db wrist curls
leg extension
leg press
calf press
seated leg curl
ab crunch machine
torso twist machine

not looking to gain muscle or get huge, not looking to become superstrong, just looking to maintain health and fitness and be injury free....without also effecting my golf swing....2 to 3 days per week allow me to hit each muscle without spending too much time in the gym, as I like to hit the driving range on my rest days
3 way spilt was not efficient for me as I would miss workouts
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Andrew42

I train full body, generally three times per week.

Been at this for 34 years, and pleased to be carrying over 200 pounds of lean body weight (about 10% body fat) at a height of 6'0 and 51 years of age.

For those that remember me, my routine template is published in Dr. Darden's Old School HIT Bodybuilding book. It's basically 8-10 exercises, alternating antagonistic muscle groups.

Generally two sets per exercise; but it's more about getting about two minutes of tension time per exercise. That's the "sweet spot" for me.

First set focuses on Mechanical Tension and the second set(s) on Metabolic Stress.

My first set is the heaviest I can do for 6-10 reps. I then drop the weight 10-20% for the second set and use a wide variety of variables to extend tension time.

For example:

Drop Set
Myoreps/Rest Pause
J Reps (zones)
X Reps (Holman technique)
Basic straight set with higher reps (15-25)

I do not train to failure (mostly) generally 1-2 reps short. I am laser focused on the REP, and using a smooth stroke with a great muscle feel and contraction.

This controlled intensity allows me to train with greater frequency and flexibility. My muscles stay quite peaked on this format, and this frequency aligns with muscle protein synthesis (48 hours) which I think helps maintain my muscle condition of my 30 thirties, into my 50's.

When I was younger I was obsessed with simple strength progression and going to failure on every set. Pivoting the focus on the rep, on "feel" , and using quite a bit of variety in technique and exercise selection is far superior at my age and training experience. I now use my strength to train my muscles, instead of using my muscles to exhibit strength.

What's refreshing and relaxing is new research that finally proves it DOESNT MATTER how often you train a muscle or how many meals per day you eat - it's quite simply the total volume of exercise and nutrients you take in within a given timeframe (per week for exercise, per day for nutrients) that matters.

No need to obsess over meal timing, # of meals, protein intake(pulse vs. spread out), - and whatever volume of exercise you need can be spread over 1, 2, or 3 days per body part. Just do what you like - body part split, upper/lower body, or full body. In the end, it all about the same results for everyday natural bodybuilder so.

I like full body because of its elegance, it's flexibility, and the sense of fulfillment and completeness I feel at the end of the workout.

I feel kinda like Hercules....after all, didn't he train full body three times per week?

Andrew
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Nwlifter

I was thinking next time I do full body, something like this

Mon pull emphasis
Rows
Pulldowns
Straight Arm Pulldowns or pullovers
Shrugs
Curls
Bench
Squats
Calves


Wed. leg emphasis
Squats
Hack squats
Leg ext
Leg curls
S. Calves
D. Calves
Bench
Un. Pulldowns

Fri. Push emphasis
Bench
INC. Bench
Ohp
Laterals
Pressdowns
Un. Pulldowns
Squats
Calves
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

I ALWAYS incorporate Lower and Upper body in every workout. I usually split the body in half, as I've repeated on many occasions:

1. Quads / Arms
2. Calves / Hams / Torso

OR

1. Quads / Push
2. Calves/Hams / Pull

Usually, before I take a short layoff, I'll do one great Whole Body workout to step off into rest time. It's usually pre-fatigue or reverse pre-fatigue in set-up:

Leg Ext / Hack Squats
Overhead Tri Ext / Incline Press
Alt DB Curls / Supination Pulldowns
Lateral Raises / High Pulls
Reverse Curls or Forearm Extensor "Curls" / Standing Forearm Flexor Curls

A few of the supersets might be traditional HIT, but these days many are multi-set oriented.

Scott
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Ray200

Currently working on a 4-way split, but I use the following full-body routine every 4 months for c.7 weeks:

Mon:
Front Squat
Dips
Pendlay Rows

Wed:
Front Squat (85% of training max)
Floor Press
Chins

Fri:
Front Squat (85% of training max)
Deadlift
Military Press

I prefer full-body to split- but have to choose where my priorities lie on a particular cycle, e.g., the frequency of the above is great for my Front Squat progress, but does hit my Deadlift a little.

Best,
Ray
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EricF

Yes. Typically a "big 5" weekly, alternating with an assistance day where I do small muscles like abs and calves later in the week.

Lately I have been rotating in an arm workout every few workouts which also hits the entire upper body via chins and dips.
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PTDaniel

I train clients on full body routines usually. I also use them for occasional periods. I think they are better for general conditioning than splits, but splits are superior for hypertrophy and strength.
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HeavyHitter32

Nwlifter wrote:
I was thinking next time I do full body, something like this

Mon pull emphasis
Rows
Pulldowns
Straight Arm Pulldowns or pullovers
Shrugs
Curls
Bench
Squats
Calves


Wed. leg emphasis
Squats
Hack squats
Leg ext
Leg curls
S. Calves
D. Calves
Bench
Un. Pulldowns

Fri. Push emphasis
Bench
INC. Bench
Ohp
Laterals
Pressdowns
Un. Pulldowns
Squats
Calves


I've done something like that before actually...at twice per week...but same concept. I also like what the other poster said about adding some tactics while staying shy of failure. If you're going to all out failure, it just becomes too much in my opinion.
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

It reminds me when I first started developing Zone Training... a few people claimed that they didn't want to try it as they preferred full-body training. For some reason they didn't grasp that you can do full-body training while applying Zone Training. Strange.
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Nwlifter

Great replies everyone, some really good thoughts and points!

So most are cautious about failure training too often, interesting.

I haven't done full body for years, this week I was testing out Pitt-Force, but man, that seems already to be killing me off worse than DC training did. Been thinking, a more often gentler push so to speak might be better.

Thanks for all the posts, going to re-read them, some great routine ideas in here.
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Nwlifter

Brian Johnston wrote:
It reminds me when I first started developing Zone Training... a few people claimed that they didn't want to try it as they preferred full-body training. For some reason they didn't grasp that you can do full-body training while applying Zone Training. Strange.


Yes, that is weird. Zone's are how you do a set, not about your split or exercises per day.
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Andrew42

Actually applying concepts like Zone Training is what makes full body work for me. It allows the needed volume (contractions) without the systematic drain that I would experience with simple failure-based training.

For all my sets today, I stop when movement perceptibly slows or I'm about to enlist other muscle groups to participate. No need to train until movement isn't possible as I know in 48 hours (or so), I'll be at it again. Ok to leave a little in the tank.

Certainly failure training was quite important when I was starting out to understand how to push my limits - and I still do one heavy set on a handful of exercises per workout with focus on strength.

It's the balance between some Mechanical Tension and Metabolic Stress that creates the volume "sweet spot".

Andrew
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Nwlifter

Good points.

One thing I always think about...

We can display strength increases in an exercise, without muscle gains (from neural, etc.) but we know, IF we do gain muscle size, that muscle WILL be stronger. So, zero strength gains does mean zero growth.

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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

There are non-contractile properties of muscle hypertrophy... things that do not lead to more strength. Then again, you would have to accurately and truly measure strength, which is NOT based on lifting a barbell or moving weight in a typical machine.
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Nwlifter

Yes, glycogen can draw water in, in general when they measured single muscle fibers, the CSA was proportional to its max strength, all fibers, even type 1 or type 2, strength was always reliably directly related to cross sectional area. So it seemed, the non contractile attributes were very small in variation.

The whole muscle though is also affected by fat, connective tissue, etc.

So I should say, if the 'fiber adds contractile element' (hypertrophy) it will be stronger
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Nwlifter

This study points to diameter over CSA , but size was still proportional to strength

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/...010.055269/full

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HeavyHitter32

Nwlifter wrote:
Great replies everyone, some really good thoughts and points!

So most are cautious about failure training too often, interesting.

I haven't done full body for years, this week I was testing out Pitt-Force, but man, that seems already to be killing me off worse than DC training did. Been thinking, a more often gentler push so to speak might be better.

Thanks for all the posts, going to re-read them, some great routine ideas in here.


I've always found heavy, intense type of training very (or too) demanding to sustain. Maybe it's because I'm more of an ectomorph and seem to thrive on a bit more frequency, volume, and lesser intensity.
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

It's not just glycogen.
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