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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Muscle by Sam Fussell
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backtrack

I wish I'd read this sooner. A great read for anyone interested in the subculture of bodybuilding and all that comes with it. Gotta say this is one of the best books I've read on bodybuilding and bodybuilders. He really captures the mindset. Although I never took up lifting weights because I was scared of people in general although I've never lived in America let alone New York.
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Rikus

I read it in 1992 I think. Took the shine of the fantasy a bit.

I think "the Mecca" of Venice Beach Gold's Gym is a fantasy of the culture and camaraderie of the group of people there in the early/mid 70's.

But then everyone who read about in magazines or watched Pumping Iron, had the fantasy of going. But the reality doesn't match the fantasy.

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backtrack

I read an online interview with the author shortly after reading the book. A couple of years old now. Although he never went back to it he did admit he misses the feeling of being able to squat 5 as he calls it. Looks like he ultimately saw the negatives as outweighing the positives.
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Lioncourt

"Gorilla Suite" by Bob Paris is another good one worth reading. I only got around to reading it last year and he has some good stories. It pulls back the curtain on professional BBing in the 80s and the IFBB.
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HeavyHitter32

Lioncourt wrote:
"Gorilla Suite" by Bob Paris is another good one worth reading. I only got around to reading it last year and he has some good stories. It pulls back the curtain on professional BBing in the 80s and the IFBB.


I seem to recall that title. I might have to pick it up at some point as 80s BBing intrigues me.
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Rikus

I read Gorilla Suit as well. I think you had to be genetically gifted to succeed and succeeding didn't amount to much. Weider made money but no one else really did and they were at his mercy.

It's all an illusion, the Venice Beach mecca, bodybuilding culture.

I think the old ways of physical culture is a better approach. Do it for health and fun, do it because you enjoy it. Not for contests, trophies or expectation of anything.

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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

Before resistance training caught the attention of the general public not many people lifted weights and even fewer were into bodybuilding so there was a camaraderie that existed.
The AAU ,state,regional,collegiate,USA,America and teen contests were held in YMCAs and high school auditoriums. It was fun, it was like being part of an elite club.
Steroids were around but most guys were to embarrassed to admit they " cheated ".
In my opinion Joe Weider ruined the whole thing.
It was probably inevitable that it would end but he rushed it along.
Robbie Robinson sued Joe for putting his ( Joes ) head on a bust of Robbies upper body without Robbies consent.
Just to give you a bit of an idea who Joe was.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Bill Sekerak wrote:
Before resistance training caught the attention of the general public not many people lifted weights and even fewer were into bodybuilding so there was a camaraderie that existed.
The AAU ,state,regional,collegiate,USA,America and teen contests were held in YMCAs and high school auditoriums. It was fun, it was like being part of an elite club.
Steroids were around but most guys were to embarrassed to admit they " cheated ".
In my opinion Joe Weider ruined the whole thing.
It was probably inevitable that it would end but he rushed it along.
Robbie Robinson sued Joe for putting his ( Joes ) head on a bust of Robbies upper body without Robbies consent.
Just to give you a bit of an idea who Joe was.


===Scott==
Ruined what whole thing? Joe was just a promoter like Arthur Jones,Bob Hoffman or Don King only he was better at getting what he wanted out of it.They all took some poor athlete in need of a way to make money and exploited them.Like Jones didn't exploit Casey. Like Jones didn't grab Sergio, Arnold or Coe and pay them peanuts and try to act like they got big using Nautilus?Look at the attention Casey brought Jones and did he make good money? Hah!
Yes Joe pushed his guys to use more drugs etc but if you were around in the early days of muscle magazines which one would you look at, Strength and Health with a fairly muscular guy and maybe some chick on the cover or one with a shot of Arnold exploding from every portion of his body? You were going to get the Arnold magazine. Joe was a smuck like Nixon but knew how to sell and take advantage of those around him.Even though 99% of us had no hope of getting anywhere near as big as the guys in Joes magazines like it or not it did inspire a bunch of us to workout towards that goal.
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perrymk

I have a stack of similar books, including Sam Fussell's. Someday I should re-read them but currently am reading similar books but from Appalachian Trail thru-hikers, not bodybuilders.

Here is a list of a few of the body building genre:

Muscle Wars. The Behind the Scenes Story of Competitive Bodybuilding (1985)
Rick Wayne
-1960s on

The Body Shop (2010) Paul Solotaroff
-Story begins around 1976

The Black Prince. My Life in Bodybuilding: Muscle vs Hustle (2011) Robby Robinson
-mid 1970s on

Gorilla Suit. My Adventure in Bodybuilding (1997) Bob Paris
-story bounces from mid-1970s through mid-1990s

Women of Steel (1998) Maria R. Lowe
-1990s?

Death, Drugs, and Muscle (2010) Gregg Valentino
-1990s
-I include this at the risk of being shunned forever on this site. It?s a good read though.


If memory serves, the following are more of a general story than a personal experience.

Hustle. A Writer?s Trip Through a Sport With No Boundaries (2004) Jon Hotten
-1980s through 1990s

MuscleTown USA. Bob Hoffman and the Manly Culture of York Barbell (1999) John D. Fair
-1930s on

Brothers of Iron (2006) Joe & Ben Weider
-1930s on

Bodybuilding Tracing the Evolution of the Ultimate Physique (2011) Gordon Lavelle
-sort of a Reader?s Digest version of Muscle Smoke and Mirrors


Muscle Smoke and Mirrors (2008, 2011, 2015) Randy Roach
-several volumes out there, all are awesome
-probably the best history of bodybuilding available


I?m sure I could dig up a few more but that?s enough for now.

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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

entsminger wrote:
Bill Sekerak wrote:
Before resistance training caught the attention of the general public not many people lifted weights and even fewer were into bodybuilding so there was a camaraderie that existed.
The AAU ,state,regional,collegiate,USA,America and teen contests were held in YMCAs and high school auditoriums. It was fun, it was like being part of an elite club.
Steroids were around but most guys were to embarrassed to admit they " cheated ".
In my opinion Joe Weider ruined the whole thing.
It was probably inevitable that it would end but he rushed it along.
Robbie Robinson sued Joe for putting his ( Joes ) head on a bust of Robbies upper body without Robbies consent.
Just to give you a bit of an idea who Joe was.

===Scott==
Ruined what whole thing? Joe was just a promoter like Arthur Jones,Bob Hoffman or Don King only he was better at getting what he wanted out of it.They all took some poor athlete in need of a way to make money and exploited them.Like Jones didn't exploit Casey. Like Jones didn't grab Sergio, Arnold or Coe and pay them peanuts and try to act like they got big using Nautilus?Look at the attention Casey brought Jones and did he make good money? Hah!
Yes Joe pushed his guys to use more drugs etc but if you were around in the early days of muscle magazines which one would you look at, Strength and Health with a fairly muscular guy and maybe some chick on the cover or one with a shot of Arnold exploding from every portion of his body? You were going to get the Arnold magazine. Joe was a smuck like Nixon but knew how to sell and take advantage of those around him.Even though 99% of us had no hope of getting anywhere near as big as the guys in Joes magazines like it or not it did inspire a bunch of us to workout towards that goal.


What in the world are you talking about ? Arthur Jones had nothing to do with holding bodybuilding contests.
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Lioncourt

Bill Sekerak wrote:
What in the world are you talking about ? Arthur Jones had nothing to do with holding bodybuilding contests.


I'm going off memory from what was in Randy Roach's Muscle Smoke & Mirrors vol. 2 book, but didn't he want to start a Mr. Nautilus contest? I also think he had the opportunity, but passed, to purchase one of the older organizations like AAU.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

entsminger wrote:
...Joe was just a promoter like Arthur Jones,Bob Hoffman or Don King only he was better at getting what he wanted out of it.They all took some poor athlete in need of a way to make money and exploited them.Like Jones didn't exploit Casey. Like Jones didn't grab Sergio, Arnold or Coe and pay them peanuts and try to act like they got big using Nautilus?Look at the attention Casey brought Jones and did he make good money? Hah!
Yes Joe pushed his guys to use more drugs ...Joe was a smuck like Nixon but knew how to sell and take advantage of those around him.Even though 99% of us had no hope of getting anywhere near as big as the guys in Joes magazines like it or not it did inspire a bunch of us to workout towards that goal.


Bill Sekerak wrote:
What in the world are you talking about ? Arthur Jones had nothing to do with holding bodybuilding contests.


What indeed. And how the hell did Nixon make his way into the conversation?! Well, I guess they didn't call him 'Tricky Dick' for nothing!
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Crotalus


===Scott==
Ruined what whole thing? Joe was just a promoter like Arthur Jones,Bob Hoffman or Don King only he was better at getting what he wanted out of it.They all took some poor athlete in need of a way to make money and exploited them.


I agree ... exploitation, it's the American way.

If it weren't for Weider , though I agree he was a slick, shady business man ( again, the American way ) we all probably wouldn't have even thought of weight training. I think we all saw the magazines and were hooked. I certainly didn't think to myself at 15 years old I wanted to lift weights because it would make me healthy - I wanted to LOOK like the guys Weider promoted in his magazines using his magic supplements, equipment and methods.

So what if we couldn't reach those levels ... it certainly made us try like hell and that isn't so bad. It's your own dumb ass that's to blame if you believed all the shit he promised in a bottle and spent money on it.

Why didn't I fall for it ? I did, hook, line asnd sinker. But when I realized early on the shit was bunk I stopped buying and laughed about how stupid I was to believe it. I didn't blame Joe Weider for making me stupid, I was already stupid. He just mad money of of my stupidity.

Again, that is and always will be the American way ... like it or not.
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