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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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gdm

Jone's once said bodybuilders and weightlifters should train in almost the same way.
i.e. weightlifters should do 3 sets sets to failure (10-8-6), increasing the weight each set. In reality he said it would probably be more like 8-6-4 or 7-5-3 to start. When 10-8-6 is accomplished, add weight.

He also said , weightlifters don't like to train this way because it limits the top weights that can be used compared starting with the heaviest weights first.

Anyone ever try this method?
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Equity

gdm wrote:
Jone's once said bodybuilders and weightlifters should train in almost the same way.
i.e. weightlifters should do 3 sets sets to failure (10-8-6), increasing the weight each set. In reality he said it would probably be more like 8-6-4 or 7-5-3 to start. When 10-8-6 is accomplished, add weight.

He also said , weightlifters don't like to train this way because it limits the top weights that can be used compared starting with the heaviest weights first.

Anyone ever try this method?



Interesting, was this in the Nautilus Bulletins? An answer from Turpin or someone else with a background in competitive weightlifting (I include powerlifting in this category) would be enlightening.
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Turpin

Training in those rep ranges ( & to failure ) would never work for powerlifting . Achieving a real 1RM requires neural adaptation to the intended load and not necessarily muscular adaptation / hypertrophy. Neural adaptation can only be had by training at load close that of the intended 1RM for very low reps and NTF.

T.
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sonny153

Once again I agree with Turpin, I was a nationally ranked powerlifter for over 10 years and not 1 powerlifter I knew ever trained that way exclusively. Off season there's nothing wrong with it and in fact it could be a nice change from the grind of heavy weights and low reps but to get your max single you need multiple sets of low (1 - 3) rep training...in my opinion.
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MDieguez

Sonny153,
Would you mind breaking down your training for powerlifting, the frequency with which you trained each lift etc. Did you train assistance in a different fashion than the main lifts? I always find it interesting to hear from powerlifters that trained in relatively abbreviated fashion .
Thanks
Mike
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1958

Texas, USA

I was a light 165 pounder in the '70s and '80s,usually weighing in at about 157-160lbs,and hitting a best of 606lb squat,303lb bench(weak,I know),and 584lb deadlift.I trained squats and bench once a week on the same day in the 5 rep range,loading up to heavier 3s two weeks before a meet.I deadlifted every other week on a different day from the the SQ/BP day.I was a modified sumo deadlifter(closer stance,like Inaba),but always pulled traditional in training.I kept deadlifts reps in the 4-5 range.On all lifts,I never attempted a one rep max in the gym.
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MDieguez

Solid numbers 1958. Did you train assistance differently from the main lifts?
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sonny153

sure I'll put it in here, I will tell you now that my powerlifts were trained much differently than my assistance work. My assistance work was based on my own particular weal points and were designed to make them stronger. For example once I got a deadlift about 6 inches up I was usually good the rest of the way, so I trained the start more than the lockout. In fact I was that way with all three lifts. I din't want to make my assistance work like another lift so I just trained them lighter and with more reps (8 - 10). Keep in mind that when you're going for a max single it's the opposite of bodybuilding. In this case you want to take advantage of whatever momentum you can generate and you want to get as many muscle groups involved in the lift as possible.
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1958

Texas, USA

MDieguez wrote:
Solid numbers 1958. Did you train assistance differently from the main lifts?


Only assistance exercises were strict,paused on the clavicles overhead press,weighted pullups,and leg presses on the old Universal leg press(remember that machine? LOL).
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MDieguez

Thanks for the replies fellas. Yes, I remember the universal leg press. My 8th grade PE teacher introduced us to the multi station Universal machine.....and so it began, prompting me to beg my father for weights and a bench that Christmas.
Believe it or not, there is an old school gym ( a gem and extremely hard to find these days) near my job that has the old universal multi machine.
Mike
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

I was down in Barbados several years back and this old gym had the second generation Universal Bench Press. It had the moving cross bar, so that the resistance increased quite a bit as you pressed up. And gave me a fantastic all-around chest and triceps pump.
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