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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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State of Exercise Science 2017
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eintology

California, USA

Grant D. wrote:

PSSS: The industry needs Max Machines with longer lever loading arms to eliminate machine limitations. Question for John Little ... where are these EX-force machines? :)


It may take him a while to get back to you on this, as he's probably busy polishing the once owned by Bruce Lee, Marcy Multi Station machine, as he too is bringing exercise science 2017 to the forefront. while not being emotionally involved in the subject.

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sirloin

Grant D. wrote:
Attention all Trainees :)

Please be extremely cautious not to linger on the earlier principles of Resistance Exercise Principles. Most principles of these revelations have been abrograted by the progressive revelations of our greatest experts.

Recall that as the science has progressed ... progressive trainees have developed beyond earlier limitations ... when properly applying these nullified protocols. Of course, if one so chooses one can stagnate for decades despite extreme dedication and/or confusion. Today's State of the Art and Best Practice relies on trainees understanding the requirements of progress in strength, progress in size, and progress in load. They are: 1) Direct Intense Load Isolation into a particular Muscle (group), 2) Focus of Load to Prevent Outroading and subsequent systemic abuse and/or cheating, 3) Reduction of Session Volume, 4) Extension of Recovery Time, 5) Elimination of momentum (acceleration), 6) Allowing growth and recovery to occur thru Proper Diet and avoidance of grains and carbs thereby eliminating distractions to our human system to battle these poisons.

The choice is clear, but difficult for many to embrace and understand. One CAN progress, but it must be regulated as summarized above.

Here is the Revealing Progress of the Science (in reverse order):
a) MaxPyramid, DoeInOne, 303030, Omega
b) Advanced Max Contraction
c) Body by Science Q&A
d) Body by Science
e) Max Contraction
f) Static Contraction
g) Power Factor Training
h) Slow Burn
i) Heavy Duty
j) Super Slow
k) Nautilus Principles
l) numerous random irrational crazes
m) squats deadlifts and chalk :)

Cheers .. see you in Health and Progress.

PS: tomorrow I will undergo a three to four exercise session of MP Back Extension, 9090 Chest Row, Tricep Pullback (test measurement), and ... .... ... my Leg Press Test (10/10 for one rep. I will attempt to pin 3-45's to stack or have my son stand on stack. I will predict plus 50 pounds since last test in 2016. This is based upon my six week paced sessions on MP leg press and my leg girth measurement.

PSS: Please also recall that I make gains in every session on every exercise since I moved to Little/Darden protocols for over six years!!!

PSSS: The industry needs Max Machines with longer lever loading arms to eliminate machine limitations. Question for John Little ... where are these EX-force machines? :)


Attention is exactly what trolls crave, even middle aged ones...

Little doesnt need Xforce machines, he has a "eccentric edge" machine lol...duh!

A better question would be why do you promote eating processed crap like McDonalds and french fries?



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sirloin

simon-hecubus wrote:
Grant D. wrote:
Recall that Max Contraction and Advanced Max Contraction was so effective that proper practitioners experienced such good results that we needed the science to advance ... as it did into Max Pyramid , Doneinone aka 6060 9090 120120, and Dr. Dardens 303030. BUT for these to work one MUST reduce session volume, increase recovery time, and assure intense increased muscle loads...

The 'Science'?! Where's the science of arbitrary 'round' number solutions like 6060, 9090, 30/30/30, etc.?

Done-In-One? How about WellDone-In-Two?

Time to freshen-up up the ol' tinfoil dome protector, buddy!!


Good point, notice it wasnt addressed.

Imagine if an actual real scientist like Stephen Hawking for example, had have answered his critics on supermassive black holes by just repeating his theory over and over again, or just not addressing them at all, hoping they'll go away. Wonder would he have the creadibility he has today?
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ATP 4 Vitality

It would be great to finally get an answer to:

Aerobics are Dead!

Wait! There already is an answer!

http://www.cell.com/...4131(17)30099-2
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sirloin

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
It would be great to finally get an answer to:

Aerobics are Dead!

Wait! There already is an answer!

http://www.cell.com/...30099-2


I personally include aerobic training daily in the form of powerwalks.
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hit4me

Florida, USA

sirloin wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
It would be great to finally get an answer to:

Aerobics are Dead!

Wait! There already is an answer!

http://www.cell.com/...4131(17)30099-2

I personally include aerobic training daily in the form of powerwalks.


me too

along with circuit style weight training
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HeavyHitter32

I do 3-4 days a week up to near 20 min fairly intense on exercise bike. Sometimes power walks on treadmill. Most of my weight training workouts consist of 20-30 sec rest between sets and exercises (similar to Gironda style).
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ATP 4 Vitality

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
I do 3-4 days a week up to near 20 min fairly intense on exercise bike. Sometimes power walks on treadmill. Most of my weight training workouts consist of 20-30 sec rest between sets and exercises (similar to Gironda style).


I do daily Assault air bike rides below the ventilation threshold (VT1). Occasionally I do 20 second sprint bursts, but mainly stay below VT1. This is easily and cheaply monitored by an awareness of the breathing rate..... no fancy heart rate formulas/monitors needed. The breathing rate is a mirror of what is happening in the muscles. These Assault air bike rides help with conditioning and help with recovery no matter what one might read in BBS.

The powerhouse of the cell is the mitochondria. Aerobic conditioning increases the mitochondria the best. The majority of the mitochondria reside in the slow twitch muscle fibers. The majority of the blood vessels reside there also. Fat deposits reside near these slow twitch muscle fibers. This is the way the body was designed to cope with endurance activity. These facts ain't as sexy as HIIT, but this is the truth. There is nothing wrong with HIIT if done correctly. There is little need for a non-athlete to practice HIIT. If time to exercise is so pressing, then one better find time to be sick.

The Kenyan runners all share this type of endurance training. They don't need HIIT to rule the world of endurance running. Their diet is mostly starch.... so much for ketosis. All athletes use lots of starch. The Tour de France riders also starch up....not to mention stopping at most local pharmacies...lol. There is little need for non-athletes to resistance train with heavy weights either. Endurance training makes one feel better....access energy stores (fat) easier....and stave off insulin resistance and diabetes better.

Speaking of endurance resistance training, I experimented with long static hold times for isometrics. I did a 8 minute isometric hold with an additional 1 minute slow eccentric resulting in spaghetti legs. I also tried 30 second holds, along with 1 and 2 minute holds on my Nautilus leverage leg press. Just by feel alone, I think 1 minute holds feel best. The ventilation threshold (VT1) usually comes about 1-2 minutes after a hold. The much longer isometric hold resulted in a lesser VT1 effect.
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PTDaniel

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
I do 3-4 days a week up to near 20 min fairly intense on exercise bike. Sometimes power walks on treadmill. Most of my weight training workouts consist of 20-30 sec rest between sets and exercises (similar to Gironda style).

I do daily Assault air bike rides below the ventilation threshold (VT1). Occasionally I do 20 second sprint bursts, but mainly stay below VT1. This is easily and cheaply monitored by an awareness of the breathing rate..... no fancy heart rate formulas/monitors needed. The breathing rate is a mirror of what is happening in the muscles. These Assault air bike rides help with conditioning and help with recovery no matter what one might read in BBS.

The powerhouse of the cell is the mitochondria. Aerobic conditioning increases the mitochondria the best. The majority of the mitochondria reside in the slow twitch muscle fibers. The majority of the blood vessels reside there also. Fat deposits reside near these slow twitch muscle fibers. This is the way the body was designed to cope with endurance activity. These facts ain't as sexy as HIIT, but this is the truth. There is nothing wrong with HIIT if done correctly. There is little need for a non-athlete to practice HIIT. If time to exercise is so pressing, then one better find time to be sick.

The Kenyan runners all share this type of endurance training. They don't need HIIT to rule the world of endurance running. Their diet is mostly starch.... so much for ketosis. All athletes use lots of starch. The Tour de France riders also starch up....not to mention stopping at most local pharmacies...lol. There is little need for non-athletes to resistance train with heavy weights either. Endurance training makes one feel better....access energy stores (fat) easier....and stave off insulin resistance and diabetes better.

Speaking of endurance resistance training, I experimented with long static hold times for isometrics. I did a 8 minute isometric hold with an additional 1 minute slow eccentric resulting in spaghetti legs. I also tried 30 second holds, along with 1 and 2 minute holds on my Nautilus leverage leg press. Just by feel alone, I think 1 minute holds feel best. The ventilation threshold (VT1) usually comes about 1-2 minutes after a hold. The much longer isometric hold resulted in a lesser VT1 effect.


How does VT1 differ from lactate threshold? Currently I'm adding aerobic/anaerobic endurance training to some of my trainees' exercise regimes.

Do you know of any thorough sources a trainer like myself just beginning to explore this type of exercise can read? I like writing that starts with readily observable and applicable things, then develops principles alongside those observations and applications.
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sirloin

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
I do 3-4 days a week up to near 20 min fairly intense on exercise bike. Sometimes power walks on treadmill. Most of my weight training workouts consist of 20-30 sec rest between sets and exercises (similar to Gironda style).

I do daily Assault air bike rides below the ventilation threshold (VT1). Occasionally I do 20 second sprint bursts, but mainly stay below VT1. This is easily and cheaply monitored by an awareness of the breathing rate..... no fancy heart rate formulas/monitors needed. The breathing rate is a mirror of what is happening in the muscles. These Assault air bike rides help with conditioning and help with recovery no matter what one might read in BBS.

The powerhouse of the cell is the mitochondria. Aerobic conditioning increases the mitochondria the best. The majority of the mitochondria reside in the slow twitch muscle fibers. The majority of the blood vessels reside there also. Fat deposits reside near these slow twitch muscle fibers. This is the way the body was designed to cope with endurance activity. These facts ain't as sexy as HIIT, but this is the truth. There is nothing wrong with HIIT if done correctly. There is little need for a non-athlete to practice HIIT. If time to exercise is so pressing, then one better find time to be sick.

The Kenyan runners all share this type of endurance training. They don't need HIIT to rule the world of endurance running. Their diet is mostly starch.... so much for ketosis. All athletes use lots of starch. The Tour de France riders also starch up....not to mention stopping at most local pharmacies...lol. There is little need for non-athletes to resistance train with heavy weights either. Endurance training makes one feel better....access energy stores (fat) easier....and stave off insulin resistance and diabetes better.

Speaking of endurance resistance training, I experimented with long static hold times for isometrics. I did a 8 minute isometric hold with an additional 1 minute slow eccentric resulting in spaghetti legs. I also tried 30 second holds, along with 1 and 2 minute holds on my Nautilus leverage leg press. Just by feel alone, I think 1 minute holds feel best. The ventilation threshold (VT1) usually comes about 1-2 minutes after a hold. The much longer isometric hold resulted in a lesser VT1 effect.


"There is little need for non-athletes to resistance train with heavy weights"

Sometimes i think planet of the apes was a non-fictional documentary...

Heavy strength training in a safe and progressive manner has done wonders for...
- Reducing back and neck pain
- stress levels
- Improving mental health
- My self conifdence
- Providing the necessary stimulation for increased lean mass
- Maintaining lean mass while fat is being lost
- Injury resistance (as i found out in a freak car accident a few years ago)

And thats just the tip of the iceberg!

Gotta love these guru's
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HeavyHitter32

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:


Speaking of endurance resistance training, I experimented with long static hold times for isometrics. I did a 8 minute isometric hold with an additional 1 minute slow eccentric resulting in spaghetti legs. I also tried 30 second holds, along with 1 and 2 minute holds on my Nautilus leverage leg press. Just by feel alone, I think 1 minute holds feel best. The ventilation threshold (VT1) usually comes about 1-2 minutes after a hold. The much longer isometric hold resulted in a lesser VT1 effect.


Are you concerned at all about potentially very high blood pressure spikes with static holds?
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ATP 4 Vitality

HeavyHitter32 wrote:

Are you concerned at all about potentially very high blood pressure spikes with static holds?


No.

My BP (measured in my Dr.'s office) was 110 over 70 recently.

As I stated previously, I see no reason for non-athletes to use heavy weights, therefore I use light to moderate weights and asynchronous muscle recruitment to muscular fatigue. I've tried to perfect my breathing technique to good effects and rarely feel any effects of my blood pressure increasing during any resistance training technique including isometrics.

I did notice slight lowering of blood pressure when I started doing aerobic Assault air bike rides. Salt restriction is also a plus.
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sirloin

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:

Are you concerned at all about potentially very high blood pressure spikes with static holds?


No.

My BP (measured in my Dr.'s office) was 110 over 70 recently.

As I stated previously, I see no reason for non-athletes to use heavy weights, therefore I use light to moderate weights and asynchronous muscle recruitment to muscular fatigue. I've tried to perfect my breathing technique to good effects and rarely feel any effects of my blood pressure increasing during any resistance training technique including isometrics.

I did notice slight lowering of blood pressure when I started doing aerobic Assault air bike rides. Salt restriction is also a plus.


There you have it HH, eat an 80/10/10 diet, one or two meals per day, then sit on your arse and hold light weights while watching paint dry, and you too could look like an endurance athlete from a developing country.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Waitaminute! Wasn't there a recent thread where someone cited information that statics and isometrics, done properly, would actually lower one's resting BP readings?
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sirloin

simon-hecubus wrote:
Waitaminute! Wasn't there a recent thread where someone cited information that statics and isometrics, done properly, would actually lower one's resting BP readings?


There is research showing that. For me personally though, the issue is restricting blood flow and venous blood return while preforming them, especially my given my history.
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ATP 4 Vitality

PTDaniel wrote:
How does VT1 differ from lactate threshold? Currently I'm adding aerobic/anaerobic endurance training to some of my trainees' exercise regimes.

Do you know of any thorough sources a trainer like myself just beginning to explore this type of exercise can read? I like writing that starts with readily observable and applicable things, then develops principles alongside those observations and applications.


I'm partial to this article:

running.competitor.com/2013/10/training/whats-the-ventilatory-threshold-and-why-does-it-matter_18338

And this book:

"Turn Up Your Fat Burn" by Alyssa Shaffer

To get an overview of VT1 may require lots of review of the Kreb's cycle, especially energy production of the citric acid cycle. Also note that during anaerobic energy production, pyruvate can enter the mitochondria and produce ATP, but, it can stay in the cytoplasm and be converted to lactate, also used by muscle for energy, ie. pyruvate is part of a complex system of cellular energy respiration. A complex cascade of energy production is contained in cells, especially the mitochondria, with the aerobic respiration dominating energy production and energy efficiency.

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ATP 4 Vitality

simon-hecubus wrote:
Waitaminute! Wasn't there a recent thread where someone cited information that statics and isometrics, done properly, would actually lower one's resting BP readings?


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/.../pubmed/1501558

http://www.berkeleywellness.co...

Ken Hutchins had an extremely good article on isometrics, especially for stroke victims, which I have an interest in.

ren-ex.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/TimedStaticContractions.pdf

Some would do better to think first.... but thinking is hard work.
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sirloin

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
simon-hecubus wrote:
Waitaminute! Wasn't there a recent thread where someone cited information that statics and isometrics, done properly, would actually lower one's resting BP readings?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/.../pubmed/1501558

http://www.berkeleywellness.co...

Ken Hutchins had an extremely good article on isometrics, especially for stroke victims, which I have an interest in.

ren-ex.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/TimedStaticContractions.pdf

Some would do better to think first.... but thinking is hard work.


I did think first oh high and mighty one, i took the advise of a neurologist and cardiologist.
Once the risks were much lower of a repeat, i started employing static holds again, with "heavy" loads in rest pause fashion (ive now stopped employing them). 14 years on since my stroke and thankfully no repeats.

As for Hutchins (whats his credentials btw?), he believes that training with lighter loads and longer holding times etc are a safer way to train, he may be right in some cases, of course then you have those that disagree with him, in that they have sucessfully train hundreds (and in some cases thousands) of indivduals (including non athletes) employing "heavy" loads without anyone ever getting injuried.

In my own opinion, without "heavy" overload (not necessarily every workout), muscle can be built, but not dense muscle. I see posers in the gym all the time who lift and lay lights weights with large muscles, but their soft and lack density.

Whats the benifit to having denser muscles? Well when i slipped in the shower about 10 years ago and smacked my forearm off the taps hard, my forearm came up in a huge lump, so i went to the accident ward were it was xrayed...no broken bones! The doctor said its likely my arm wasnt broke because i have very dense forearm muscles. Same thing in a freak car accident i was in a couple of years ago.











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Average Al

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
It would be great to finally get an answer to:

Aerobics are Dead!

Wait! There already is an answer!

http://www.cell.com/...30099-2




Of course, the original 'aerobics', as outlined in Ken Cooper's book, didn't employ high intensity interval training. The programs were built around lower intensity steady exercise, with duration or distance as key variables.

It would have been interesting if longer duration, lower intensity cardio had been included as a fourth exercise modality in this study.

Personally, I like the longer duration (30 minute) interval training programs found in Martin Gibala's book. The intense portions are not as intense as something like a true Tabata.

At my age, super high intensity of effort is difficult to reach and sustain. By doing a longer HIIT routine once or twice a week, I feel comfortable doing my strength training routines at a more comfortable pace, with longer rest intervals between exercises (or sets).
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
Waitaminute! Wasn't there a recent thread where someone cited information that statics and isometrics, done properly, would actually lower one's resting BP readings?


ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
...Some would do better to think first.... but thinking is hard work.


Clarification needed on your P-A posting:
Think first before asking questions?
OR
Think first before doing isometrics?

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HeavyHitter32

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
simon-hecubus wrote:
Waitaminute! Wasn't there a recent thread where someone cited information that statics and isometrics, done properly, would actually lower one's resting BP readings?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/.../pubmed/1501558

http://www.berkeleywellness.co...

Ken Hutchins had an extremely good article on isometrics, especially for stroke victims, which I have an interest in.

ren-ex.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/TimedStaticContractions.pdf

Some would do better to think first.... but thinking is hard work.


I thought Hutchins and the Super Slow crowd had little credibility in your mind?

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ATP 4 Vitality

simon-hecubus wrote:
simon-hecubus wrote:
Waitaminute! Wasn't there a recent thread where someone cited information that statics and isometrics, done properly, would actually lower one's resting BP readings?


ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
...Some would do better to think first.... but thinking is hard work.

Clarification needed on your P-A posting:
Think first before asking questions?
OR
Think first before doing isometrics?



A wise man gave me these words so I would not be as controversial. So....I think hard so my remarks may not incite. But...as the wise sage said...thinking is hard work..... and I have found the wisdom of seasoning words with proverbial salt.
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ATP 4 Vitality

Average Al wrote:


Of course, the original 'aerobics', as outlined in Ken Cooper's book, didn't employ high intensity interval training. The programs were built around lower intensity steady exercise, with duration or distance as key variables.



And rightly so. Evidence abounds showing Ken Cooper's lower intensity steady-state exercise works well. I use my Assault air bike for daily rides...only occasionally going above the VT1 level. I don't need the HIIT type training to be healthy, and the time savings of HIIT does not apply well to my circumstances.



It would have been interesting if longer duration, lower intensity cardio had been included as a fourth exercise modality in this study.


The researchers don't want to test against Ken Cooper's recommendations, because the results are already in. Every wonder why these HIIT studies are always short term? The mitochondrial concentration is going to be higher with Cooper's recommendations in the long term. These researchers know this. The half-life of mitochondrial is less than a week. That is why exercising every 2 weeks with HIT leads to deconditioning. You will not hear that at BBS or John Little. The Kenyans rule endurance running because they have applied experience. Compete against them with HIIT and a Paleo diet at one's own peril. Better yet...read about the Tarahumara.



Personally, I like the longer duration (30 minute) interval training programs found in Martin Gibala's book. The intense portions are not as intense as something like a true Tabata.

At my age, super high intensity of effort is difficult to reach and sustain. By doing a longer HIIT routine once or twice a week, I feel comfortable doing my strength training routines at a more comfortable pace, with longer rest intervals between exercises (or sets).


A non-athlete does not need HIIT to be healthy. The slow twitch fibers contain the most mitochondria, and blood vessels, and are uniquely situated to burn fat residing in muscle tissue. Weight training increases mitochondria in fast twitch fibers as well as does HIIT, but this does not make for an good endurance athlete. Not to mention that there appears no limit to mitochondria density with Cooper's type of conditioning, which leaves HIIT in the dust after a few weeks. Healthy endurance training is quite sustainable...HIIT....not so much.....Tabata....impossible.

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=FnwIKZhrdt4
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ATP 4 Vitality

HeavyHitter32 wrote:

I thought Hutchins and the Super Slow crowd had little credibility in your mind?



Training a few patients who have had strokes has had an effect on my thoughts.

Furthermore, his ideas on isometrics and breathing were quite true.

Finally, I agree with his statement involving muscle fiber recruitment along the entire length of musculature and isometrics.

I disagree with his position of overcoming isometrics. This might be useful for athletes and competition, but may be dangerous if practiced. Yielding isometrics seem much safer.
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sirloin

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Average Al wrote:


Of course, the original 'aerobics', as outlined in Ken Cooper's book, didn't employ high intensity interval training. The programs were built around lower intensity steady exercise, with duration or distance as key variables.



And rightly so. Evidence abounds showing Ken Cooper's lower intensity steady-state exercise works well. I use my Assault air bike for daily rides...only occasionally going above the VT1 level. I don't need the HIIT type training to be healthy, and the time savings of HIIT does not apply well to my circumstances.



It would have been interesting if longer duration, lower intensity cardio had been included as a fourth exercise modality in this study.


The researchers don't want to test against Ken Cooper's recommendations, because the results are already in. Every wonder why these HIIT studies are always short term? The mitochondrial concentration is going to be higher with Cooper's recommendations in the long term. These researchers know this. The half-life of mitochondrial is less than a week. That is why exercising every 2 weeks with HIT leads to deconditioning. You will not hear that at BBS or John Little. The Kenyans rule endurance running because they have applied experience. Compete against them with HIIT and a Paleo diet at one's own peril. Better yet...read about the Tarahumara.



Personally, I like the longer duration (30 minute) interval training programs found in Martin Gibala's book. The intense portions are not as intense as something like a true Tabata.

At my age, super high intensity of effort is difficult to reach and sustain. By doing a longer HIIT routine once or twice a week, I feel comfortable doing my strength training routines at a more comfortable pace, with longer rest intervals between exercises (or sets).


A non-athlete does not need HIIT to be healthy. The slow twitch fibers contain the most mitochondria, and blood vessels, and are uniquely situated to burn fat residing in muscle tissue. Weight training increases mitochondria in fast twitch fibers as well as does HIIT, but this does not make for an good endurance athlete. Not to mention that there appears no limit to mitochondria density with Cooper's type of conditioning, which leaves HIIT in the dust after a few weeks. Healthy endurance training is quite sustainable...HIIT....not so much.....Tabata....impossible.

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=FnwIKZhrdt4


Yeah, must say, the likes of De Vany and Sission are in terrible shape, espiecally for the advanced age, speaking of age, isnt the average tarahumara's life expectancy to be 45?
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