MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
Retiring
First | Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
Author
Rating
Options

HeavyHitter32

hit4me wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
hit4me wrote:
coomo wrote:
hit4me wrote:
did the cardiologist specifically instruct you to change your weightlifting style or is that just you changing it on your own?

just curious to what the heart dr said about lifting as he was ok with doing as much cardio as you would like
Yes he did.Stop all heavy lifting.Ok to do pump style workouts, plus as much aerobic as I want.No restrictions on heart rate either.



as we all know, heavy lifting is relative
therefore, performing a lighter weight for higher reps to MMF (15 to 25 reps)should be ok or performing a lighter weight using more time under tension and going to MMF should be fine (5-7 reps using a 4/4/4 tul), or instead of MMF, just stop short by one rep...am I correct in that assumption
no rest pauses or using a weight that will blow a gasket, or cause your neck and facial expressions to look like the incredible hulk or cause your body to be shaking as you are performing that rep.



I still wouldn't go to true failure or even one rep shy with 15-25 reps. As coomo correctly pointed out, straining is bad...even if a lighter weight is safer than a heavier. Straining is not even recommended at the toilet when constipated.

A better approach to this matter would be a cumulative fatigue effect in the muscles with multiple sets, reps, etc. Muscle fatigue is an element to hypertrophy and can be done without excessive straining or very high blood pressure spikes.

I get that....I guess I am having a hard time understanding what is meant by straining, because even when I did Arnold style training years ago..there was still straining going on
I see individuals straining when they are doing multiple sets

my assumption to what you mean is to use a weight heavy enough to stop at about 4 reps short of failure and use a normal controlled rep cadense and perform about 3 to 5 sets to get a pump and do not worry about increasing the weight or reps each time you workout



'Grinding' might be a better word to use here - avoid grinding reps or reps are you struggling to complete Once the motions starts to slow near the end of the set might be a good point to stop. If I recall, even Turpin avoids the 'grinding' reps just for performance purposes.
Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
hit4me wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
hit4me wrote:
coomo wrote:
hit4me wrote:
did the cardiologist specifically instruct you to change your weightlifting style or is that just you changing it on your own?

just curious to what the heart dr said about lifting as he was ok with doing as much cardio as you would like
Yes he did.Stop all heavy lifting.Ok to do pump style workouts, plus as much aerobic as I want.No restrictions on heart rate either.



as we all know, heavy lifting is relative
therefore, performing a lighter weight for higher reps to MMF (15 to 25 reps)should be ok or performing a lighter weight using more time under tension and going to MMF should be fine (5-7 reps using a 4/4/4 tul), or instead of MMF, just stop short by one rep...am I correct in that assumption
no rest pauses or using a weight that will blow a gasket, or cause your neck and facial expressions to look like the incredible hulk or cause your body to be shaking as you are performing that rep.



I still wouldn't go to true failure or even one rep shy with 15-25 reps. As coomo correctly pointed out, straining is bad...even if a lighter weight is safer than a heavier. Straining is not even recommended at the toilet when constipated.

A better approach to this matter would be a cumulative fatigue effect in the muscles with multiple sets, reps, etc. Muscle fatigue is an element to hypertrophy and can be done without excessive straining or very high blood pressure spikes.

I get that....I guess I am having a hard time understanding what is meant by straining, because even when I did Arnold style training years ago..there was still straining going on
I see individuals straining when they are doing multiple sets

my assumption to what you mean is to use a weight heavy enough to stop at about 4 reps short of failure and use a normal controlled rep cadense and perform about 3 to 5 sets to get a pump and do not worry about increasing the weight or reps each time you workout



'Grinding' might be a better word to use here - avoid grinding reps or reps are you struggling to complete Once the motions starts to slow near the end of the set might be a good point to stop. If I recall, even Turpin avoids the 'grinding' reps just for performance purposes.


now, that makes sense....its amazing a difference a word makes

Open User Options Menu

sirloin

I prefer the term powerlifters and strength trainees use for straining, I.e., "grinders", were the ability to lift a load with a natural cadance ceases to be possible and the rep/s are having to be painstakingly "inched" out.

Yesterday I stupidly did this on the smith machine bench because I wanted to achieve an arbitrary number of reps with x amount of weight, the result, I give myself an exercise induced headache?and had to cut the workout short. Moreover, today I feel more systematically fatigued than normal.
Open User Options Menu

sirloin

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
hit4me wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
hit4me wrote:
coomo wrote:
hit4me wrote:
did the cardiologist specifically instruct you to change your weightlifting style or is that just you changing it on your own?

just curious to what the heart dr said about lifting as he was ok with doing as much cardio as you would like
Yes he did.Stop all heavy lifting.Ok to do pump style workouts, plus as much aerobic as I want.No restrictions on heart rate either.



as we all know, heavy lifting is relative
therefore, performing a lighter weight for higher reps to MMF (15 to 25 reps)should be ok or performing a lighter weight using more time under tension and going to MMF should be fine (5-7 reps using a 4/4/4 tul), or instead of MMF, just stop short by one rep...am I correct in that assumption
no rest pauses or using a weight that will blow a gasket, or cause your neck and facial expressions to look like the incredible hulk or cause your body to be shaking as you are performing that rep.



I still wouldn't go to true failure or even one rep shy with 15-25 reps. As coomo correctly pointed out, straining is bad...even if a lighter weight is safer than a heavier. Straining is not even recommended at the toilet when constipated.

A better approach to this matter would be a cumulative fatigue effect in the muscles with multiple sets, reps, etc. Muscle fatigue is an element to hypertrophy and can be done without excessive straining or very high blood pressure spikes.

I get that....I guess I am having a hard time understanding what is meant by straining, because even when I did Arnold style training years ago..there was still straining going on
I see individuals straining when they are doing multiple sets

my assumption to what you mean is to use a weight heavy enough to stop at about 4 reps short of failure and use a normal controlled rep cadense and perform about 3 to 5 sets to get a pump and do not worry about increasing the weight or reps each time you workout



'Grinding' might be a better word to use here - avoid grinding reps or reps are you struggling to complete Once the motions starts to slow near the end of the set might be a good point to stop. If I recall, even Turpin avoids the 'grinding' reps just for performance purposes.


Beat me to it lol;)

Open User Options Menu

pharaoh1063

Coomo,

What about Compensatory Acceleration Training? Would this work? For those who don't know, this where one pushes a sub-maximal weight as fast as possible in the concentric portion after a slow negative. From there one terminates the set as soon as the rep speed which was established in the first few reps, slows down even slightly.

There are absolutely no "grinding" reps at all. I just tried a set of these with a weight that I have used for 16 reps to failure. I found that my rep speed started to slow at the 12th rep. 13 would have started the process of the aforementioned grinding.

I would like to know what you or anyone else thinks. Since a few people know that I have been involved in the weight training world for some time and people who are in their 40's and up sometimes ask me for info. In case I run into people who can't or shouldn't train to failure, I would like to have some other options that I can recommend.
Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

sirloin wrote:
I prefer the term powerlifters and strength trainees use for straining, I.e., "grinders", were the ability to lift a load with a natural cadance ceases to be possible and the rep/s are having to be painstakingly "inched" out.

Yesterday I stupidly did this on the smith machine bench because I wanted to achieve an arbitrary number of reps with x amount of weight, the result, I give myself an exercise induced headache?and had to cut the workout short. Moreover, today I feel more systematically fatigued than normal.


yeah, that's probably pushing it too far....you know whats funny though...of all the videos I have seen of mentzer, viator, darden, Flanagan, lopez, superslow or the old nautilus training, I have not really seen anyone "grinding"
Open User Options Menu

sirloin

hit4me wrote:
sirloin wrote:
I prefer the term powerlifters and strength trainees use for straining, I.e., "grinders", were the ability to lift a load with a natural cadance ceases to be possible and the rep/s are having to be painstakingly "inched" out.

Yesterday I stupidly did this on the smith machine bench because I wanted to achieve an arbitrary number of reps with x amount of weight, the result, I give myself an exercise induced headache?and had to cut the workout short. Moreover, today I feel more systematically fatigued than normal.


yeah, that's probably pushing it too far....you know whats funny though...of all the videos I have seen of mentzer, viator, darden, Flanagan, lopez, superslow or the old nautilus training, I have not really seen anyone "grinding"


Ive watched quite a few old nautilus videos on cyperpump were grinders were employed. Superslow and panting like a dog is far from natural imo, in some ways it is grinding in and of itself. Then youve videos of the likes of Mcguff lying on the floor barely able to breath or talk for 10 minutes post workout.
To John Littles credit, he mentioned that we "hitters" are quick to have a go at the high volume guys for their lack of intensity, yet we (hitters), can use way too much intensity.
Lee Haney said it best for me with his famous quote "stimulate, not annihilate".

Open User Options Menu

sirloin

https://m.youtube.com/...h?v=yzuqSt7DK6I

Diffo grinding on the last rep on the movements here, and the 10/10 superslow cadence is goes out the window.
Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

sirloin wrote:
https://m.youtube.com/...h?v=yzuqSt7DK6I

Diffo grinding on the last rep on the movements here, and the 10/10 superslow cadence is goes out the window.


agreed this is grinding and I see no benefit in performing this type of workout
i prefer the old nautilus videos of mentzer training coe

Open User Options Menu

HeavyHitter32

pharaoh1063 wrote:
Coomo,

What about Compensatory Acceleration Training? Would this work? For those who don't know, this where one pushes a sub-maximal weight as fast as possible in the concentric portion after a slow negative. From there one terminates the set as soon as the rep speed which was established in the first few reps, slows down even slightly.

There are absolutely no "grinding" reps at all. I just tried a set of these with a weight that I have used for 16 reps to failure. I found that my rep speed started to slow at the 12th rep. 13 would have started the process of the aforementioned grinding.

I would like to know what you or anyone else thinks. Since a few people know that I have been involved in the weight training world for some time and people who are in their 40's and up sometimes ask me for info. In case I run into people who can't or shouldn't train to failure, I would like to have some other options that I can recommend.


Funny you bring this up as this is similar to my rep style right now. I think the intra-pressures that cause blood pressure spikes are especially brought on from slower positives to failure. I use about a 1 second (to maybe 1.5 second) positive and around a 3 second negative. I avoiding the grinding reps as well, of course.

I also find slower positives hurt my knees. X-ray shows I have some minor arthritis in my knees and going too slow causes more irritation where as faster alleviates it.
Open User Options Menu

sirloin

hit4me wrote:
sirloin wrote:
https://m.youtube.com/...h?v=yzuqSt7DK6I

Diffo grinding on the last rep on the movements here, and the 10/10 superslow cadence is goes out the window.

agreed this is grinding and I see no benefit in performing this type of workout
i prefer the old nautilus videos of mentzer training coe


Love those videos of Mike and Coe, great banter between the two:)
Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

sirloin wrote:
hit4me wrote:
sirloin wrote:
https://m.youtube.com/...h?v=yzuqSt7DK6I

Diffo grinding on the last rep on the movements here, and the 10/10 superslow cadence is goes out the window.

agreed this is grinding and I see no benefit in performing this type of workout
i prefer the old nautilus videos of mentzer training coe


Love those videos of Mike and Coe, great banter between the two:)


no grinding in this demo by Dr. Darden
https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=kw9-F0Ix_vA


Open User Options Menu

sirloin

hit4me wrote:
sirloin wrote:
hit4me wrote:
sirloin wrote:
https://m.youtube.com/...h?v=yzuqSt7DK6I

Diffo grinding on the last rep on the movements here, and the 10/10 superslow cadence is goes out the window.

agreed this is grinding and I see no benefit in performing this type of workout
i prefer the old nautilus videos of mentzer training coe


Love those videos of Mike and Coe, great banter between the two:)


no grinding in this demo by Dr. Darden
https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=kw9-F0Ix_vA




True, but then I wouldnt push a pensioner to the point were hes lying on the floor barely able to breath neither. Dont get me wrong, there is indeed many good examples, but there are indeed also many bad examples.
Open User Options Menu

sirloin

https://m.youtube.com/...h?v=9KavhUif7a4

Our chat yesterday put me in the mood to watch these, in this one, watch how Boyer grinds out the last rep, moreover his back is rounded / form goes out the window.
Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

sirloin wrote:
hit4me wrote:
sirloin wrote:
hit4me wrote:
sirloin wrote:
https://m.youtube.com/...h?v=yzuqSt7DK6I

Diffo grinding on the last rep on the movements here, and the 10/10 superslow cadence is goes out the window.

agreed this is grinding and I see no benefit in performing this type of workout
i prefer the old nautilus videos of mentzer training coe


Love those videos of Mike and Coe, great banter between the two:)


no grinding in this demo by Dr. Darden
https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=kw9-F0Ix_vA




True, but then I wouldnt push a pensioner to the point were hes lying on the floor barely able to breath neither. Dont get me wrong, there is indeed many good examples, but there are indeed also many bad examples.


could not agree more
Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

sirloin wrote:
https://m.youtube.com/...h?v=9KavhUif7a4

Our chat yesterday put me in the mood to watch these, in this one, watch how Boyer grinds out the last rep, moreover his back is rounded / form goes out the window.


in all the videos his form is kind of sloppy...and in some of Mike and Ray's videos of training were kind of too......makes me wonder if Arthur and friends were not as strict on form as we tend to think they were, or maybe we are taking form to the extreme

Open User Options Menu
First | Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy