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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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entsminger

Virginia, USA

--- Scott ---
Not a week goes by on here where I don't see some fuss over cardio or aerobic exercise and how you don't need it. I'm now reaching almost 65 and I work out sporadically at best and sometimes not once in a month but my strength level is not that far off from my best. At the same time I have cut back as drastically on my cardio work.

My endurance has plummeted . When working around the house moving and lifting heavy stuff and when working out I feel about as strong as ever but I get winded just walking up moderate hills and in the past I did marathons and triathlons. If you ask me what's more important at this point it would be better endurance. I'd say think twice before knocking cardio work or you'll find out the hard way how important it is!!
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hit4me

Florida, USA

entsminger wrote:
--- Scott ---
Not a week goes by on here where I don't see some fuss over cardio or aerobic exercise and how you don't need it. I'm now reaching almost 65 and I work out sporadically at best and sometimes not once in a month but my strength level is not that far off from my best. At the same time I have cut back as drastically on my cardio work.

My endurance has plummeted . When working around the house moving and lifting heavy stuff and when working out I feel about as strong as ever but I get winded just walking up moderate hills and in the past I did marathons and triathlons. If you ask me what's more important at this point it would be better endurance. I'd say think twice before knocking cardio work or you'll find out the hard way how important it is!!


that's why Roger Callard always preached sets of 15-25 reps to failure at least twice a week
10-14 exercises one set
and walking on the days he did not train

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Nwlifter

entsminger wrote:
--- Scott ---
Not a week goes by on here where I don't see some fuss over cardio or aerobic exercise and how you don't need it. I'm now reaching almost 65 and I work out sporadically at best and sometimes not once in a month but my strength level is not that far off from my best. At the same time I have cut back as drastically on my cardio work.

My endurance has plummeted . When working around the house moving and lifting heavy stuff and when working out I feel about as strong as ever but I get winded just walking up moderate hills and in the past I did marathons and triathlons. If you ask me what's more important at this point it would be better endurance. I'd say think twice before knocking cardio work or you'll find out the hard way how important it is!!


right on! agreed!
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MikaelPR

Hey Scott
Why not circuit train ; heavy compound movements with no rest between?
Mike
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HeavyHitter32

You're better off using Gironda-like training (lighter to moderate loads with 15-30 second rest between multiple sets and exercises) to get the most sustainable cardio effect from weight training. Circuit training another option. However, I find the bike and getting the heart rate up the best route; I do around 20 min reasonably intense sessions 3-4 times a week.
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ATP 4 Vitality

entsminger wrote:
--- Scott ---
If you ask me what's more important at this point it would be better endurance. I'd say think twice before knocking cardio work or you'll find out the hard way how important it is!!


Amen

Your experience, mine, and countless others who no longer post here, can relate to exactly what you posted.

Cardio work is indispensable.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

MikaelPR wrote:
Hey Scott
Why not circuit train ; heavy compound movements with no rest between?
Mike


==Scott==
Yes that is one way to work cardio in to your training. I've done that in the past with good results but it's not my preferred way to train.That way sort of short changes each side to get both into one workout.My real point is that most people don't train that way and if you follow certain thinking that cardio is not necessary then you will be short changing your endurance side by not doing some cardio. Being able to bench 350 is great or curl 120 pounds but in the real world how often does that come into practical use compared to when you go on a hike or climb a long flight of stairs or a mountain trail to find you are breathing so hard you have to take rest pauses to get to the top.That extra inch on your arms doesn't help much there, ha ha.
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sirloin

entsminger wrote:
--- Scott ---
Not a week goes by on here where I don't see some fuss over cardio or aerobic exercise and how you don't need it. I'm now reaching almost 65 and I work out sporadically at best and sometimes not once in a month but my strength level is not that far off from my best. At the same time I have cut back as drastically on my cardio work.

My endurance has plummeted . When working around the house moving and lifting heavy stuff and when working out I feel about as strong as ever but I get winded just walking up moderate hills and in the past I did marathons and triathlons. If you ask me what's more important at this point it would be better endurance. I'd say think twice before knocking cardio work or you'll find out the hard way how important it is!!


I completely disagree. Both are important! My wife worked in an nursing home for the elderly for a several year period, in that time many patients died because of falls, the falls themselves didnt kill these people, but it would result in a broken hip or arm, and in most cases, it was the begining of the end.
The same happened my uncle at the beginning of this year, he was being treated for cancer and parkinson's, but they didnt kill him, he was going to get the paper one morning and fell, and when he went to stand up his femur snapped like a twig. while in hospital he took an infection and died. (all his life he was a keen cyclist, cycling up to 60-70 miles at a time).

Why do older people fall? Muscle atrophy! Why are their injuries so bad from a fall? Because their bones are weak! Progressive strength training greatly reduces the risk of such things from happening.

Endurance is of course is also important, this is why imo, one should engage in "heavy" training (and not just once in a blue moon), combined with brisk walking, cycling or whatever turns you on.
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sirloin

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
entsminger wrote:
--- Scott ---
If you ask me what's more important at this point it would be better endurance. I'd say think twice before knocking cardio work or you'll find out the hard way how important it is!!

Amen

Your experience, mine, and countless others who no longer post here, can relate to exactly what you posted.

Cardio work is indispensable.


Neither is "heavy" strength training, especially as we age, I.e., for the maintainance of muscle and increased bone density.

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HeavyHitter32

sirloin wrote:

Why do older people fall? Muscle loss! Why are their injuries so bad from a fall? Because their bones are frill! Progressive strength training greatly reduces the risk of such things from happening.


That is definitely a factor, but as we age loss of coordination becomes an issue too which contributes to elderly falls and another reason why more need to be off the road from driving when it gets bad.


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sirloin

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
sirloin wrote:

Why do older people fall? Muscle loss! Why are their injuries so bad from a fall? Because their bones are frill! Progressive strength training greatly reduces the risk of such things from happening.


That is definitely a factor, but as we age loss of coordination becomes an issue too which contributes to elderly falls and another reason why more need to be off the road from driving when it gets bad.

All the more reason to strength train then, because as we know it also improves balance and coordination.
Furthermore, It also can delay the onset of dementia and parkinson's, something that none of us would ever want to experience. It also can help with depression (something many elderly people suffer from).




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sirloin

Mark Rippetoe made this statement...

"Stronger people are harder to kill than weak people, and more usuful in general".

I was able to walk away from this car accident with minior injuires, my friend the driver had a broken wrist and a concussion. Moreover, my father-in-law lives 3 doors down from me, he fixes up racing bikes and cars, hes forever asking me to help lift engines, push start cars etc. I agree with Rippetoe's statement.
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ATP 4 Vitality

"Resistance exercise load does not determine training-mediated hypertrophic gains in young men"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/...les/PMC3404827/

"In summary, we report that similar resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy can result from lifting loads to failure with higher (80% of 1RM) and lower (30% of 1RM) loads than are currently recommended for novice lifters."

-------------

Use of 30-50% of 1RM while circuit resistance training may be enough for general health, but may fall short in the "wind" aspect for many trainees. The anaerobic nature of weight training will never adequately condition the mitochondria of the slow twitch muscle fibers.
Right now, there are no long-term studies to prove either way. The burden of proof is with the high intensity conglomerate, who state no aerobics are necessary. Empirical evidence along with short term scientific studies and human anatomy shows that low intensity aerobic training best conditions stamina. Important to note, no competitive endurance athlete uses circuit training as their main training methodology.
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HeavyHitter32

sirloin wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
sirloin wrote:

Why do older people fall? Muscle loss! Why are their injuries so bad from a fall? Because their bones are frill! Progressive strength training greatly reduces the risk of such things from happening.


That is definitely a factor, but as we age loss of coordination becomes an issue too which contributes to elderly falls and another reason why more need to be off the road from driving when it gets bad.

All the more reason to strength train then, because as we know it also improves balance and coordination.
Furthermore, It also can delay the onset of dementia and parkinson's, something that none of us would ever want to experience. It also can help with depression (something many elderly people suffer from).






I agree weight training helps, but balance and coordination issues are still going to occur as natural deterioration/changes in the brain happen. A 90 year old is not going to be driving as good as 60 regardless of having more muscle mass same as walking. Just reality.
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sirloin

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
sirloin wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
sirloin wrote:

Why do older people fall? Muscle loss! Why are their injuries so bad from a fall? Because their bones are frill! Progressive strength training greatly reduces the risk of such things from happening.


That is definitely a factor, but as we age loss of coordination becomes an issue too which contributes to elderly falls and another reason why more need to be off the road from driving when it gets bad.

All the more reason to strength train then, because as we know it also improves balance and coordination.
Furthermore, It also can delay the onset of dementia and parkinson's, something that none of us would ever want to experience. It also can help with depression (something many elderly people suffer from).






I agree weight training helps, but balance and coordination issues are still going to occur as natural deterioration/changes in the brain happen. A 90 year old is not going to be driving as good as 60 regardless of having more muscle mass same as walking. Just reality.


Of course it does, but not to the same degree, brain function is improved with ST (coordination, balance, mental health, delay onset of dementia, parkinson etc, more than ample researh showing this). Iresspective of this, having maintained more muscle and stronger bones is going help to a great degree. After the age of 40, we lose 1 percent bone density per year, this can be reduce by more than half with regular strength training. This can be the differance between breaking a hip or not.
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sirloin

https://www.psychologytoday.co...
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sirloin

https://mobile.nytimes.com/...e&_r=0&referrer

We can cherry pick research all day ATP...
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HeavyHitter32

sirloin wrote:
https://www.psychologytoday.co...

Makes sense and it's a new 'skill' for most people. I know when I had to use the stairs daily at my job (when I was doing no cardio at the time) it got easier.
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sirloin

https://m.youtube.com/...h?v=F4NBXkiWsMk

JF makes good points here. Think its fair to say that, like Dr D, Jim knows a thing or two about this.
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hit4me

Florida, USA

I am trying to understand the debate here on this thread

1. strength training is important to health. it will help prevent injuries in everyday life, i.e. fall, crashes, bumps. and heavy training is relative.

2. cardio is important to health. it will make it easier to do things, i.e. play with your grandkids, climb the steps, walk a golf course, run away from a bear.

hit...combines both in one workout, i.e. circuit training or nautilus style training.
if you only weight train once or twice a week, go for a power walk the days you don't train..it won't hurt ya.

as for professional endurance athletes....west point, Miami dolphins, Cincinnati bengals and penn state all proved that nautilus style weight training was beneficial along with their normal drills on the practice field.
also, who on here are professional endurance athletes

now, I will say that mass training is not that beneficial to your health (I am talking about gross mass)

just my two cents worth



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1958

Texas, USA

My zero-aerobics results:
Age 59
Consistent strength training since 1970
Running back(football) and sprinter in high school
Over the last 47 years I have taken only the occasional week off from strength training.
I get my "cardio"(whatever that is) from once a month 20 rep squats,alternated with once a month 30 rep Hammer leg press.
Resting HR at nap time drops to 40bpm.
Everyday walking around HR is around 54-58bpm
Body composition is highly favorable for my age.I'm not shredded ripped,but I'm not chubby or pudgy either.
I walk my dogs every night,but since my dogs are old and slow,believe me,it's not a brisk walk at all.
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sirloin

hit4me wrote:
I am trying to understand the debate here on this thread

1. strength training is important to health. it will help prevent injuries in everyday life, i.e. fall, crashes, bumps. and heavy training is relative.

2. cardio is important to health. it will make it easier to do things, i.e. play with your grandkids, climb the steps, walk a golf course, run away from a bear.

hit...combines both in one workout, i.e. circuit training or nautilus style training.
if you only weight train once or twice a week, go for a power walk the days you don't train..it won't hurt ya.

as for professional endurance athletes....west point, Miami dolphins, Cincinnati bengals and penn state all proved that nautilus style weight training was beneficial along with their normal drills on the practice field.
also, who on here are professional endurance athletes

now, I will say that mass training is not that beneficial to your health (I am talking about gross mass)

just my two cents worth





100% agree. Hence the term strength AND conditioning.
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backtrack

The human body is designed as an all purpose unit so in reality you're always going to need a little bit of everything.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
I don't see any reason for debate here other than people on here just have to argue. My point is not to exclude cardio from your life in favor of just heavy lifting. They both are important !! In my case it seems that the cardio aspect diminishes much faster with old age than the strength.
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sirloin

entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
I don't see any reason for debate here other than people on here just have to argue. My point is not to exclude cardio from your life in favor of just heavy lifting. They both are important !! In my case it seems that the cardio aspect diminishes much faster with old age than the strength.


Scott, your a gentleman (much more than i am) and i apologise if i was curt. My issue is that there is two gurus here whom believe that we should train the way they do.
One believes non-athletes havent any reason to train "heavy", to which i say bullshit, and at the other end there is a complete tool that says we should only train once in a blue moon with static holds and superslow and do no cardio (according to him we shouldnt even have any physical hobbies as they will just end up hurting us).
I had enough of being told what i should or shouldnt do after having a stroke 15 years ago. Ive said it before, i care less how others train, each to their own, but i'll be damned if im going to be told how am supposed to train or live my life.

As i said to one doctor "its my life and i'll live it as i see fit, and i'll do this until they throw the dirt on me".

Best
Rob
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