MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
Nautilus Duo Squat Machine
1 | 2 | 3 | Next | Last
Author
Rating
Options

Jesse Lee Otis

I created this thread because of all the attention the Duo Squat machine was getting in another subject thread; I hope that it is okay with the rest of you.

In that thread, Crotalus wrote:
===================================
After reading so much about it I moved to a place where the local YMCA had a lot of the old Nautilus pieces, including the Duo-Squat !!

What a disappointment when I discovered the pain on my shoulders and neck was unbearable. I tried it many times with various pillows and cushions and just could not relieve the terrible pressure it had on my shoulders, neck and traps.

I know I'm not the only one who had this problem and wonder if it was ever corrected ?
======================================

Crotalus -- It sounds like you were using the [first] version of the DS machine in which the seat was at an incline and there were pads that the user's shoulders pressed upward against. That indeed caused shoulder pain - and I could hardly breathe on that version because of the downward force from the pads. That version was replaced by one with an upright seat that eliminated those problems; however, then the machine became what I saw as more of a 'duo-leg press' machine since it really emulated an alternating-leg leg press machine.

Am I off-base on this - or am I correct in my assessment of the second version being closer to a leg press machine than the first version ?


Jesse Lee
Open User Options Menu

Crotalus

I have no idea on the second version - didn't even know there was a second version.

But your description is right on ; an incline seat angle and shoulder pads that felt like you were going to tear your shoulders off your body the pressure was so severe.

I tried to use it a few times but like I said, couldn't concentrate on my legs while dealing with the shoulder pain.

I can tell you when I tried it too ... it was in 1990. Was the newer version out at that time ? Thing is with those larger, old Nautilus machines ... even if there was a 'New and Improved' this or that , what gym was going to replace one of those monsters with another ?

Isn't it something ? I have never used a DS in a good way, it was the biggest equipment let down for me of all time - yet STILL I'm fascinated with the thing because of what I read about it from so many HIT authorities.

The workout Darden described Jones killing Ray Mentzer with in the Nautilus Bodybuilding Book stuck with me forever ... like many things in Darden's books has.
Open User Options Menu

g0ld3nuncw

North Carolina, USA

There were two different machines. The duo squat and the duo leg press. I own the duo squat (510 stack) but have never used the duo leg press. For some reason the incline doesn't bother my shoulders. I feel some pressure but nothing that hinders the working set. I like the duo, done correctly and with intensity I feel it is a great muscle builder.
Open User Options Menu

Jesse Lee Otis

Crotalus wrote:
I have no idea on the second version - didn't even know there was a second version.

But your description is right on ; an incline seat angle and shoulder pads that felt like you were going to tear your shoulders off your body the pressure was so severe.

I tried to use it a few times but like I said, couldn't concentrate on my legs while dealing with the shoulder pain.

I can tell you when I tried it too ... it was in 1990. Was the newer version out at that time ? Thing is with those larger, old Nautilus machines ... even if there was a 'New and Improved' this or that , what gym was going to replace one of those monsters with another ?

Isn't it something ? I have never used a DS in a good way, it was the biggest equipment let down for me of all time - yet STILL I'm fascinated with the thing because of what I read about it from so many HIT authorities.

The workout Darden described Jones killing Ray Mentzer with in the Nautilus Bodybuilding Book stuck with me forever ... like many things in Darden's books has.


----------------------------------\\
Crotalus --- What g0ld3nuncw has posted is very interesting - and may give us much insight into what I am calling the 'first version and second version'. I'm going to inquire of him about this.

Jesse Lee

Open User Options Menu

Jesse Lee Otis

g0ld3nuncw wrote:
There were two different machines. The duo squat and the duo leg press. I own the duo squat (510 stack) but have never used the duo leg press. For some reason the incline doesn't bother my shoulders. I feel some pressure but nothing that hinders the working set. I like the duo, done correctly and with intensity I feel it is a great muscle builder.


----------------------------------\\

g0ld3nuncw -- You bring up very interesting info. The duo-squat that you talk about is what I might be calling the 'first version' -- and the duo-leg press that you mention might be what I am calling the 'second version'. The difference between the two machines is the seat structure. In the one that I call the 'first version' and what you may be calling the duo-squat, the user is in a reclining position with shoulders up against pads and pushes out with legs in what is pretty much an alternating-leg squat. In what I am calling the 'second version' - and what you may be referencing as the duo leg-press, the seat is upright and the action is really similar - if not identical - to someone doing alternating leg presses. Are they actually two different-named machines -- or are they the same machine with a change in the seat structure ? My understanding is that since the seat structure on the first version caused shoulder/back pain, it was changed to the upright position. Please elaborate on what you know about this.

Jesse Lee
Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

if the duo squat causes shoulder pain, then why does Dr. Darden speak highly of it....and he did mention that most trainers perform the exercise incorrectly.
Open User Options Menu

frostyF

Arkansas, USA

This
Open User Options Menu

Crotalus

Yeah, that is NOT the one I used ... first time I ever saw this one . Thanks for posting the pic.

The one I used is the original with the shoulder pads and slight incline position.

I always wonder what made the DS so painful ... calf machines with the entire stack plus more won't cause the pain a DS did ... nothing else I can remember did.

So why didn't this second version take off' ? The next big Nautilus leg machine I heard praises about after the DS was the Leverage Leg Press. Never had the opportunity to try one though.
Open User Options Menu

g0ld3nuncw

North Carolina, USA

Both versions shown on Bill Casto's IFR web site...

Resources
1st Generation
Open User Options Menu

DNAHelix

New York, USA

Duo Squat, the original 510 lbs stack, is a great machine. I've never had any pain in my neck or shoulders using it.
Open User Options Menu

Jesse Lee Otis

frostyF -- Thanks much for posting that picture. That is what I have been referring to as 'version 2' of the duo-squat machine (maybe in error). Perhaps it is an entirely different machine and properly called a duo-legpress.

Crotalus -- If you look at the YouTube video https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=JWmSHrhZkUM you will see the machine that you probably used (and what I have been calling 'version 1' of the duo-squat machine). When I used it I had trouble breathing deeply enough to satisfy what my body was requiring - because of the force on my shoulders from the pads.

I wish that Dr. Darden would come to our rescue and tell us what the names of those machines actually are - and whether the one with the upright seat is a modified version of the one with the reclining seat.

Jesse Lee
Open User Options Menu

Jesse Lee Otis

g0ld3nuncw wrote:
Both versions shown on Bill Casto's IFR web site...

Resources
1st Generation


---------------------------------

g0ld3nuncw --

Thanks for that info; I just now looked at the pics of those machines. They look like the same machine except for the seat assembly. Is it possible to change from one to the other by changing seat assemblies ?

Jesse Lee

Open User Options Menu

g0ld3nuncw

North Carolina, USA

Yes, I read where someone changed the seat assembly themselves on a duo squat, basically converting it to the leg press. May or may not have been on this site, maybe it was on You Tube.
Open User Options Menu

Ellington Darden

The machine with the shoulder pads, the one Boyer Coe was using in the video, was the Nautilus Duo-Squat machine. Later, a version that had a more upright seat, was called a Duo-Leg Press machine.

Yes, some trainees had difficulty doing the Duo-Squat because of the pressure on the shoulders. I found some of the pressure could be relieved by leaning forward and positioning the pads more on the back of the shoulders, rather than the front of the shoulders.

I believe the only difference between the two machines was the seat unit.

Ellington
Open User Options Menu

Jesse Lee Otis

Ellington Darden wrote:
The machine with the shoulder pads, the one Boyer Coe was using in the video, was the Nautilus Duo-Squat machine. Later, a version that had a more upright seat, was called a Duo-Leg Press machine.

Yes, some trainees had difficulty doing the Duo-Squat because of the pressure on the shoulders. I found some of the pressure could be relieved by leaning forward and positioning the pads more on the back of the shoulders, rather than the front of the shoulders.

I believe the only difference between the two machines was the seat unit.

Ellington


------------------------

Thanks a million, doc; you are the man. I hope that you are doing well.

Have you talked to Mike Fulton of Medical Exercise Associates in Daytona Beach lately ? I was there for knee therapy some years ago.


Jesse Lee


Open User Options Menu

Jesse Lee Otis

g0ld3nuncw wrote:
Yes, I read where someone changed the seat assembly themselves on a duo squat, basically converting it to the leg press. May or may not have been on this site, maybe it was on You Tube.


--------------------------------

g0ld3nuncw -- Thanks much for the reply and info.
Open User Options Menu

entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
Earlier on one of these threads I had mentioned that the Duo-Squat machine couldn't replicate the good had from squats but I failed to mention that while I think squats to be the ultimate leg blaster I still hate them.The pain associated with a heavy bar on ones shoulders, the ease with which one can get injured doing squats etc,etc, makes the duo-squat machine,in my opinion, a better choice.
Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
Earlier on one of these threads I had mentioned that the Duo-Squat machine couldn't replicate the good had from squats but I failed to mention that while I think squats to be the ultimate leg blaster I still hate them.The pain associated with a heavy bar on ones shoulders, the ease with which one can get injured doing squats etc,etc, makes the duo-squat machine,in my opinion, a better choice.


in my opinion, the back squats put too much pressure on the spine, shoulders and work too much glutes

Open User Options Menu

Jesse Lee Otis

entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
Earlier on one of these threads I had mentioned that the Duo-Squat machine couldn't replicate the good had from squats but I failed to mention that while I think squats to be the ultimate leg blaster I still hate them.The pain associated with a heavy bar on ones shoulders, the ease with which one can get injured doing squats etc,etc, makes the duo-squat machine,in my opinion, a better choice.

------------------------------------

I hear you loud & clear -- and towels wrapped around the bar don't help much at all. I just watched some vids where people were using a Safety Squat Bar - with various styles. I imagine that you have heard of the SSB and maybe have used it. If not, search for safety squat bar on YouTube; lots of vids on them.


Jesse Lee



Open User Options Menu

g0ld3nuncw

North Carolina, USA

Jesse Lee Otis wrote:
entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
Earlier on one of these threads I had mentioned that the Duo-Squat machine couldn't replicate the good had from squats but I failed to mention that while I think squats to be the ultimate leg blaster I still hate them.The pain associated with a heavy bar on ones shoulders, the ease with which one can get injured doing squats etc,etc, makes the duo-squat machine,in my opinion, a better choice.
------------------------------------

I hear you loud & clear -- and towels wrapped around the bar don't help much at all. I just watched some vids where people were using a Safety Squat Bar - with various styles. I imagine that you have heard of the SSB and maybe have used it. If not, search for safety squat bar on YouTube; lots of vids on them.


Jesse Lee



I took a bar off of a Squat Smith Machine and modified it with some front handles. It's balanced perfectly I actually don't even need to use my hands to perform squats.

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=t-kc9IdUGZ4

Open User Options Menu

entsminger

Virginia, USA

hit4me wrote:
entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
Earlier on one of these threads I had mentioned that the Duo-Squat machine couldn't replicate the good had from squats but I failed to mention that while I think squats to be the ultimate leg blaster I still hate them.The pain associated with a heavy bar on ones shoulders, the ease with which one can get injured doing squats etc,etc, makes the duo-squat machine,in my opinion, a better choice.

in my opinion, the back squats put too much pressure on the spine, shoulders and work too much glutes



==Scott===
I agree , for sports working the glutes is great but for bodybuilding not so great . My wife found squats worked the glutes better than anything and nice big glutes are great on women but Big glutes on a guy look goofy .
Open User Options Menu

Jesse Lee Otis

Brian Johnston -- What is your take on the duo-squat machine ? Have you used it ? I'm interested in reading about your thoughts on it.

Jesse Lee

Open User Options Menu

Spidercam

Hello Jesse
As you are so hungry for knowledge you need to have a look at this-
arthurjonesexercise.com
Early Ironman Magazine Articles
scroll down to the bottom to-
From here to Infinity, The DuoSquat January 1983
Arthur called the squat a miracle and I totally agree it's the single most inroad producing barbell movement anyone can perform.
I would also call the DuoSquat a miracle, the single most inroad producing movement anyone can perform all the way up to the lock-out.
Open User Options Menu

Jesse Lee Otis

Spidercam ---

Thanks much for that info; I will certainly check it out.

In your statement about the duo-squat you said "...up to the lockout". Please elaborate on that.


Jesse Lee

Open User Options Menu

backtrack

I don't think glutes on a man look goofy at at all most women tend to like this. Looking like the pink panther looks goofy to me. A reseeding back end is about as aesthetic as a reseeding jaw line.

I've never used this machine, and probably never will. One thing I have learned is that whenever I have had access to a machine that is supposedly superior to anything else I've been utterly disappointed.
Open User Options Menu
1 | 2 | 3 | Next | Last
Administrators Online: Mod Starr
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy