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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

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To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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'Functional Training and HIT'
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

...was the working title of a course I wrote for Simon Shawcross and HITuni.
Yes, the title is deliberately provocative.
I'm old enough to have been an adult during the heyday of HIT: the late 1970s and early 1980s. Mentzer was competing and featured in all the magazines. Jones had articles in Iron Man, Athletic Journal, Scholastic Coach. Nautilus Fitness Centers were a thing, as prominent as Curves once was and Orange Theory is today. Ellington Darden started a run of books in bookstores, not self published like today, but because companies that actually sold books thought it was marketable.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Now, 2018. No competitive bodybuilder or pro team even mentions Nautilus or HIT. The Nautilus, Medx, and Hammer are brands, not philosophies, and are barely visible in the health club industry. Health clubs have gutted their machines for tires and sledge hammers. Bookstores?

But, ask a new grad or newly certified trainer or even a reader of mainstream news if they've ever heard of Functional Training, and I guarantee you they've heard the phrase. They may not be able to define it or explain it, but they've seen it.

And in spite of all the hype about Functional Training, you know that some new trainer or new exerciser looks at it and says, there is no way I'm having Grandma swing a kettlebell or flip a tire. Unfortunately, unless they already know HIT, there is no readily available alternative.

So. Putting Functional Training in the title gives the course a shot at drawing those eyeballs, and gave me an excuse to break down the biomechanics involved. It's not a rant against it, sorry, I'm sure you'll find those easily. I tried to lay out what was usable under the broad umbrella "FT" from the point of view of being congruent with anatomy and biomechanics, and finished with how to incorporate the useful stuff into a HIT approach.

I'm sure some of you reading already hate it. Noted. For everyone else, I'll post links to video clips and some excerpts here over the next few days. Simon is making quite a bit of non-paying material available so people are comfortable with the purchase, and if you decide not to, enjoy the free stuff anyway.
https://www.hituni.com/...t/#.W-nocvZFzx4
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AndyMitch

Outstanding
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AndyMitch

Kieser studios are popping up all over here in Australia which is amazing to see.
It?s focus is on the older generation which is a growing industry sadly.

The one thing missing from these studios is the Arthur Jones style of hard training which imo really has nothing to do with H.I.T.

But I digress
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st3

Bill De Simone wrote:
Now, 2018. No competitive bodybuilder or pro team even mentions Nautilus or HIT. The Nautilus, Medx, and Hammer are brands, not philosophies, and are barely visible in the health club industry. Health clubs have gutted their machines for tires and sledge hammers. Bookstores?

But, ask a new grad or newly certified trainer or even a reader of mainstream news if they've ever heard of Functional Training, and I guarantee you they've heard the phrase. They may not be able to define it or explain it, but they've seen it.

And in spite of all the hype about Functional Training, you know that some new trainer or new exerciser looks at it and says, there is no way I'm having Grandma swing a kettlebell or flip a tire. Unfortunately, unless they already know HIT, there is no readily available alternative.

So. Putting Functional Training in the title gives the course a shot at drawing those eyeballs, and gave me an excuse to break down the biomechanics involved. It's not a rant against it, sorry, I'm sure you'll find those easily. I tried to lay out what was usable under the broad umbrella "FT" from the point of view of being congruent with anatomy and biomechanics, and finished with how to incorporate the useful stuff into a HIT approach.

I'm sure some of you reading already hate it. Noted. For everyone else, I'll post links to video clips and some excerpts here over the next few days. Simon is making quite a bit of non-paying material available so people are comfortable with the purchase, and if you decide not to, enjoy the free stuff anyway.
https://www.hituni.com/...cvZFzx4


Bill,
I bought it when it first came out. Love it!
Thanks
Steve

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Turpin

Bill De Simone wrote:
in spite of all the hype about Functional Training, you know that some new trainer or new exerciser looks at it and says, there is no way I'm having Grandma swing a kettlebell or flip a tire. Unfortunately, unless they already know HIT, there is no readily available alternative.



Absolute nonsense ! ? Are you saying that those two extremes are all there is ? Or that one must know HIT to offer any machine based ( or even any sensible free weight ) training routine ?

T.
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Average Al

Bill De Simone wrote:
...was the working title of a course I wrote for Simon Shawcross and HITuni.
Yes, the title is deliberately provocative.
I'm old enough to have been an adult during the heyday of HIT: the late 1970s and early 1980s. Mentzer was competing and featured in all the magazines. Jones had articles in Iron Man, Athletic Journal, Scholastic Coach. Nautilus Fitness Centers were a thing, as prominent as Curves once was and Orange Theory is today. Ellington Darden started a run of books in bookstores, not self published like today, but because companies that actually sold books thought it was marketable.


Took me a couple of passes to register that this is a course, rather than a book. Looks interesting, but even at the intro price of $100, a bit too much for me to justify, given that I do not work as a trainer.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Average Al wrote:
Bill De Simone wrote:
...was the working title of a course I wrote for Simon Shawcross and HITuni.
Yes, the title is deliberately provocative.
I'm old enough to have been an adult during the heyday of HIT: the late 1970s and early 1980s. Mentzer was competing and featured in all the magazines. Jones had articles in Iron Man, Athletic Journal, Scholastic Coach. Nautilus Fitness Centers were a thing, as prominent as Curves once was and Orange Theory is today. Ellington Darden started a run of books in bookstores, not self published like today, but because companies that actually sold books thought it was marketable.

Took me a couple of passes to register that this is a course, rather than a book. Looks interesting, but even at the intro price of $100, a bit too much for me to justify, given that I do not work as a trainer.


Understood. That's why I'm posting excerpts and links to the video Simon is making available free.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

AndyMitch wrote:
Kieser studios are popping up all over here in Australia which is amazing to see.
It?s focus is on the older generation which is a growing industry sadly.

The one thing missing from these studios is the Arthur Jones style of hard training which imo really has nothing to do with H.I.T.

But I digress


"Sadly"? Better to be growing older than the alternative! (says the 60 year old).
Interesting about Keiser in Australia, no sign of them in the US that I know of.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

st3 wrote:
Bill De Simone wrote:
Now, 2018. No competitive bodybuilder or pro team even mentions Nautilus or HIT. The Nautilus, Medx, and Hammer are brands, not philosophies, and are barely visible in the health club industry. Health clubs have gutted their machines for tires and sledge hammers. Bookstores?

But, ask a new grad or newly certified trainer or even a reader of mainstream news if they've ever heard of Functional Training, and I guarantee you they've heard the phrase. They may not be able to define it or explain it, but they've seen it.

And in spite of all the hype about Functional Training, you know that some new trainer or new exerciser looks at it and says, there is no way I'm having Grandma swing a kettlebell or flip a tire. Unfortunately, unless they already know HIT, there is no readily available alternative.

So. Putting Functional Training in the title gives the course a shot at drawing those eyeballs, and gave me an excuse to break down the biomechanics involved. It's not a rant against it, sorry, I'm sure you'll find those easily. I tried to lay out what was usable under the broad umbrella "FT" from the point of view of being congruent with anatomy and biomechanics, and finished with how to incorporate the useful stuff into a HIT approach.

I'm sure some of you reading already hate it. Noted. For everyone else, I'll post links to video clips and some excerpts here over the next few days. Simon is making quite a bit of non-paying material available so people are comfortable with the purchase, and if you decide not to, enjoy the free stuff anyway.
https://www.hituni.com/...t/#.W-nocvZFzx4

Bill,
I bought it when it first came out. Love it!
Thanks
Steve


Thank you!
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Average Al: from the first lesson.
"Hi, I?m Bill DeSimone. You may know me from a couple of manuals I wrote, Moment Arm Exercise and Congruent Exercise, or from some small YouTube clips I did almost ten years ago, or from some talks I?ve given at seminars, generally on the topic of making Exercises safer by using biomechanics .
In this course, we?ll be looking at how to use material from the so-called Functional Training (FT) approach in your HIT practice.
At first glance, these seem to be mutually contradictory approaches. And as one who watched Mike Mentzer?s career and followed his work as it happened in the 1970s, the phrase ?functional training? makes my eyes roll. But here?s the reality: in 2018, the phrase is absolutely embedded in the fitness industry, as well as in mainstream wellness media.
So I, as a professional trainer who earns his living selling exercise instruction, had a choice to make. Either rant like a crazy person every time I heard the phrase, or pick it apart to see what I could use appropriately for myself and for clients, in the context of brief, regular training sessions.
Spoiler alert: there is some legitimate, sound, material, under the label of Functional Training, that is rooted in textbook anatomy and biomechanics, that?s worth including in your and your client?s workouts.
There?s also a lot of the opposite. Material that is so unlikely to be done properly that it puts your joints in the exact vulnerable positions that you are training to avoid. Or it?s specific to a particular condition that doesn?t apply to most of the people doing it in group workouts. Or it should be used at the end of a long progression, but people are trying to do it year round.
Figuring out the difference between the legitimate and the other is the point of this course, as well as how and whether to incorporate it in the small gym/studio/home gym setting.
The issues for you as a HIT Practitioner are:
Is there anything useful in ?FT? that can solve a physical concern?
Can you deliver this as carefully and safely as you deliver your usual training instruction?
Can your physical space accommodate it?
I?m not suggesting you let the client dictate the workout. If a client/prospect insists on throwing medicine balls or heaving a barbell recklessly, you may have to tell them they are in the wrong place and accept that they are ?someone else?s client?.
But, if the client/prospect is genuinely asking, and they?re otherwise a good fit for your services, it may be that they?re just reacting to having seen the phrase ?Functional Training? so much they?re curious. No need to act like you?ve been threatened. Just say: ?machines and specific exercises are generally safe and effective for most people, and we use Functional Training to address specific concerns for each client.? Few people are going to push you past this, and if they do, they were not going to be a good fit for your services anyway.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

What is High Intensity Training (HIT)?
For me, this is the model for weight training documented by Ellington Darden, PhD, in his books starting with Strength-Training Principles and the Nautilus Book, and through The New High Intensity Training and The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results. Obviously, there are predecessors (Jones) and contemporaries (Mentzer, Hutchins), and subsequent advocates (McGuff, and the others on the HITuni list), but to my eye, Darden organized Jones? material and made it accessible to the mainstream public via his books (compared to today?s niche audiences found across the internet).
I would summarize the model this way, relative to comparing it to Functional Training:
Summary of the HIT Model
Specific exercises, whether with machines, free weights, or bodyweight;
Strict form and high effort (vs. loose form and high volume)
1-3 weekly sessions, less than an hour each.
Of course, this does not do justice to the overall body of work by Darden and others before and since; just to use as a comparison to Functional Training.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

"What is Functional Training (FT)?
Defining Functional Training can be tough, because as with many phrases in the fitness/exercise industry, ?functional training? means whatever the speaker says it means.
Originally (at least in my experience): In 1983, the physical therapists I worked near used ?FT? as a way of describing the therapeutic approach they used with patients, compared to the conventional gym exercises that personal trainers and bodybuilders used. Their idea was, they didn?t necessarily want their patients to get better at doing gym exercises; they wanted their patients to function better outside the gym. So their programs were based more on stabilizing joints, and then coordinating the muscles and joints, to work better in ?activities of daily living.?
Compared to what we were trying to do, which was get jacked.
Today, ?functional training? is a catch-all phrase covering any or all of the following.
Summary of the Functional Training Model
Core stabilization of the upper body, trunk, and lower body;
Integrated movements of the total body;
Power, plyometrics, and deceleration;
High Intensity Interval Training or circuit training utilizing all of the above;
Recovery techniques such as stretching and foam rolling.
It also tends to be defined by clich?, like:
?Improves performance and reduces injuries?
?If you can do it sitting down, it is not functional?
?Train movements, not muscles?
As with most clich?s, there are elements of truth in them, but that doesn?t make them definitive. If you are flipping a tire in your workout, is that improving your performance in anything other than flipping a tire? If you throw a medicine ball in your workout, and exaggerate twisting your spine in the process, does that reduce injuries or set you up for one? If you are sitting in a vertical chest press, and not wiggling as you press, it may not be ?functional?, but it certainly has a practical benefit, in that you?re able to stabilize your shoulder girdle under a load. And relying on training movements instead of muscles almost guarantees any muscle imbalances go uncorrected, since your body will either work around any weak links, or you?ll injure the weak link.
The clich?s may make for snappy arguments, but they aren?t necessarily a good application of anatomy and biomechanics. Simply labelling an activity ?functional? isn?t enough; you actually have to do the exercise in a way that protects the joints and works the muscles appropriately.
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Average Al

Bill De Simone wrote:

Understood. That's why I'm posting excerpts and links to the video Simon is making available free.


I do appreciate that, and thank you.

I've purchased your earlier books and found them valuable. I hope the course sales meet or exceed your expectation.

Just an observation: this strikes me as somewhat similar to what Drew Baye did a few years back, when he put together METCON routines using safe exercises, i.e., cross fit without the joint trauma.

Both seem to be good examples of selling HIT in a creative manner.
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AndyMitch

Bill De Simone wrote:
AndyMitch wrote:
Kieser studios are popping up all over here in Australia which is amazing to see.
It?s focus is on the older generation which is a growing industry sadly.

The one thing missing from these studios is the Arthur Jones style of hard training which imo really has nothing to do with H.I.T.

But I digress

"Sadly"? Better to be growing older than the alternative! (says the 60 year old).
Interesting about Keiser in Australia, no sign of them in the US that I know of.


Lol True.
But I mean ?sadly? in terms of what the fitness industry has done to a lot of people; overthinking, overtraining and injury in our younger years.
I wasn?t too clear.

As I said Werner Kieser or the business has directed his attention to this older gym rat with huge success.



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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

https://youtu.be/zBcrB3Jxgrs

Simon's intro about this clip:
As a graduate in the early 80?s, Bill started his career working on Wall Street. It was during this time that he discovered a facility in Manhattan called the Sports Training Institute- an ex-Nautilus exercise machine showroom that had developed into a Nautilus influenced training studio. At the time it was the only location offering personal training commercially anywhere he knew of.
The Sports Training Institute presented fertile ground for Bill whose interest in the world of big business was waning. Soon he was working as a personal trainer at that facility, ultimately leveraging the skills he had picked up from his college days and Wall Street to become involved in the business side of the facility. Bill quips that he learned more from the first 4 years he worked there than he did through four years of college and almost as much as from the first four years of raising a child. He developed his understanding of HIT and exercise as a personal trainer, he learned more about the practicalities of running a fitness business and gained valuable insights into working with a wide variety of people...In 1996, Bill returned to work at the Sports Training Institute to find a very different fitness industry from the one he had left years earlier. In 1983 you could count the number of gyms in Manhattan on a hand or two and Nautilus ruled the roost. By 1996, there were franchised gyms on every corner, little neighbourhood gyms were scattered about liberally, and apartment buildings had their own basement gyms, at the same time Nautilus-influenced trainers had all but disappeared.
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Landau

Florida, USA

Functional Training being used for ANYTHING is just Plain Stupid
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Landau wrote:
Functional Training being used for ANYTHING is just Plain Stupid


Then you will REALLY like this next clip.

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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Landau wrote:
Functional Training being used for ANYTHING is just Plain Stupid


This one right here:
https://youtu.be/N1M41uJAc-Y

Simon's summary: Bill recommends including the functional training methods he presents in the course when you notice that you or a client, who has been doing the standard HIT protocol; working up in weight and effort, is unable to appropriately control posture under load- such as a hunching forward at the end-range of a chest press or an inability to stabilize the shoulders through the eccentric.
At this point, he states, it is time to reduce the load a little and use the posture and stabilization techniques shown in the course. If an individual still exhibits an inability to appropriately stabilize the joints and maintain posture then it may be necessary to add in some of the corrective exercises too, enabling the individual to develop muscular control. Skipping these details and techniques and just hammering away with the intensity will lead to short or long-term issues, bad for client, bad for trainer. It is the same for those who may experience a general achy feeling in their joints- it is time to work on joint stabilization.
At the other end of the spectrum, there are clients who through your assistance have become strong, capable and able to perform all the standard HIT exercises with great posture, stability and effort. After a while these clients may crave new physical challenges, partly because they are now ?functionally fit?. Bill paraphrases the perspective of another HIT authority figure: ?We make the workout efficient, we free up people?s time, we give them a capable body?and then we think they?re going to sit on a couch, and not use the time and body?!? And adds: ?So, we can either watch as the client leaves and trashes themselves elsewhere, or we can rail about how stupid the industry is, or we can be proactive.? The Integrated Movements and appropriate power/plyometrics presented in the course facilitate a trainer ready to take a proactive approach.

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Landau

Florida, USA

Never Mind
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

TRIGGER WARNING THE PHRASE "FUNCTIONAL TRAINING" IS USED BELOW IN AN ADULT MANNER.

https://youtu.be/3O6z-mh15ZM

Simon's summary: The underpinning of sound functional training: biomechanics, anatomy, prime movers versus muscles that stabilize joints and how to address each is valid. Bill DeSimone sees that the problem today is that despite this solid foundation much in popular functional training then makes a major leap in logic resulting in ?exercises that put you in vulnerable positions you are looking to avoid such as loading the spine in flexion, twisting the spine, performing HIIT even though the form is terrible, wearing out the spinal erectors? just administering a beating in the name of functional training.?

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Landau

Florida, USA

Seriously Bill: I can't make any sense out of your previous post.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
So if I'm reading this right there must be some elements of functional training that are safe to do in conjunction with a safer Nautilus style workout. I'm curious as to what these might be or do I have to buy the book to find out, ha ha.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
So if I'm reading this right there must be some elements of functional training that are safe to do in conjunction with a safer Nautilus style workout. I'm curious as to what these might be or do I have to buy the book to find out, ha ha.


Well, I'm not going to rewrite all of it here, if that's what you're looking for.
And it's a course, not a book.

I'll see if Simon can post samples from the actual videos. Most of these show standard exercises, first with stable postures, then with instability, then side by side to see the difference. The text explains why doing them with unstable postures leads to joint issues.

If a joint needs more stability, there are corrective, nonHIT type exercises, more from physical therapy, demonstrated. And then routines laid out that incorporate both.

I also point out where the more obvious "functional" activities go wrong, specific to the joint biomechanics.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Landau wrote:
Seriously Bill: I can't make any sense out of your previous post.


Seriously, Dave: I wasn't doing this project aimed at you. And by "you," I mean people who are certain in what they already know, aren't receptive to different information, and just want to argue. I'd no sooner argue with you about this than I would with Tony Horton or Jillian Michaels or whoever the latest FT star is. Or maybe I would if it leads to more clicks, I'll cross that bridge (hah) then.

I was aiming for fans of either approach, for whom that one approach wasn't effectively addressing everything. I personally love Dr. Darden-style training, but a surgically repaired shoulder and wear and tear on my back needs something else. So for me, I start with that base, and for very sound biomechanic reasons adjust from there.

But if you don't need to, don't.
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