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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Working Out Affecting Temper
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Jesse Lee Otis

I imagine that this has 1) Been addressed on this forum before and 2) Happens to quite a few people.

I always train hard - especially my legs - and I have found from years of experience that I lose my temper much quicker when working out on a steady basis than when I have missed a few workouts. Not sure if I generate more testosterone from the workouts or what - but it is definitely a reality. I do not take any kind of steroids/growth drugs - so no 'roid rage is involved. I get mad at all kinds of things - and sometimes take it out on people.

What is the general consensus of things from people on the forum?


Jesse Lee
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HeavyHitter32

Jesse Lee Otis wrote:
I imagine that this has 1) Been addressed on this forum before and 2) Happens to quite a few people.

I always train hard - especially my legs - and I have found from years of experience that I lose my temper much quicker when working out on a steady basis than when I have missed a few workouts. Not sure if I generate more testosterone from the workouts or what - but it is definitely a reality. I get mad at all kinds of things - and sometimes take it out on people.

What is the general consensus of things from people on the forum?


Jesse Lee


Sounds like roid rage, ha.

If anything, I have found strength training to be a stress releaser.



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CD51

Training is a stress reliever and an outlet for aggression. I have the exact opposite experience and this has been consistent for me as long as I can remember.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Oftentimes, the temper issue is a sign* of Overtraining for me.
(*one of many)
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Bastion

Yes. I've experienced this several times over the years unfortunately. Just being in a negative mindset and pissed off at things and people that you normally wouldn't notice. I've even been short with and yelled at people that I shouldn't have. I believe it's a symptom of overtraining. Over stressed. As you stated, when you've missed a few workouts, you are more relaxed. I can definitely see how it could be mistaken for Roid rage. It's no secret that athletes and especially bodybuilders do some pretty odd things and get themselves into trouble regularly.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Jesse Lee Otis wrote:
I imagine that this has 1) Been addressed on this forum before and 2) Happens to quite a few people.

I always train hard - especially my legs - and I have found from years of experience that I lose my temper much quicker when working out on a steady basis than when I have missed a few workouts. Not sure if I generate more testosterone from the workouts or what - but it is definitely a reality. I get mad at all kinds of things - and sometimes take it out on people.

What is the general consensus of things from people on the forum?


Jesse Lee


== Scott==

I find I lose my temper much more when I don?t workout. I think working out acts as a stress reliever and when I?m not working out the stress builds up and I?m much more likely to explode if I got mad.
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Mega-duty

I lose my temper if i do constant tension training, even with light weights. And i may feel depression kind of symptons after workouts. If i train to failure too much, maybe especially with heavy compounds.

But then, to relieving stress with training, i have to train with extremely light weights and fast. Pyramiding weights slowly also helps a lot.

What is going in life i believe is greatly affecting in these. Close ones dying and getting diseases, mental or physical, in my experience, can severely ruin down recuperation ability, and long term problems that can not to be solved at all.
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ATP 4 Vitality


C'Mon Man! If working out brings about this effect, please change or just quit and seek professional help.

I agree with Scott and HH32 that workouts are a way to mitigate stress.


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Jesse Lee Otis

HeavyHitter32 wrote:

Sounds like roid rage, ha.

If anything, I have found strength training to be a stress releaser.


===============================

It does indeed sound like 'roid rage - but I don't take any steroids/growth drugs/etc. and never had. It is certainly not pleasant for me nor for those around me. I am certainly 'mellowed out' right after a workout (I'm in tired city, as I call it) - but I change like Jekyll & Hyde afterward.

I am not a good fighter by any stretch of the imagination - and one of these days I'm gonna spout off at the wrong person and get the crap beat outta me - or get shot.


Thanks for the input, folks.


Jesse

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Jesse Lee Otis

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:

C'Mon Man! If working out brings about this effect, please change or just quit and seek professional help.

I agree with Scott and HH32 that workouts are a way to mitigate stress.


==================================

Can't quit working out; I am addicted to it - I love it. You're right, though, about seeing a 'head doc' about it.


Jesse Lee

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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

CD51 wrote:
Training is a stress reliever and an outlet for aggression. I have the exact opposite experience and this has been consistent for me as long as I can remember.


Same here
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Gainz

Training is a form of stress, the level of which can vary significantly; eg training to failure Vs not training to failure or training in a low rep range Vs higher reps. The effect this has on a person shall vary greatly as it's very much dependant on the individual's own unique physiology.

The state of the microbiome and immune system is a major player here with regard to how big of an impact training has upon an individual's CNS.

For what it's worth, I've certainly found training to failure coupled with a lower rep range can make me a grumpy bastard :-)
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hit4me

Florida, USA

relax dude....meditate or something
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Equity

Jesse Lee Otis wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:

Sounds like roid rage, ha.

If anything, I have found strength training to be a stress releaser.


===============================

It does indeed sound like 'roid rage - but I don't take any steroids/growth drugs/etc. and never had. It is certainly not pleasant for me nor for those around me. I am certainly 'mellowed out' right after a workout (I'm in tired city, as I call it) - but I change like Jekyll & Hyde afterward.

I am not a good fighter by any stretch of the imagination - and one of these days I'm gonna spout off at the wrong person and get the crap beat outta me - or get shot.


Thanks for the input, folks.


Jesse



Just learn how to fight and buy a bullet proof vest...lol!

No seriously; it sounds like mental fatigue from overtraining making you grumpy as has been alluded to. Perhaps back off a bit and restructure your routine in the mean time. Then pay attention to the outcome on your mood relative to the routine tweaking.

Regards.

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HeavyHitter32

I guess it just depends on the person.

Even when I used to train with brutally high intensity, I never felt more aggression - just more exhaustion and flu-like symptoms for a couple of days after the workout.

I now train on an average intensity level of 8 (out of 10) and feel rather good usually. Occasionally, I might push a final set to 9 or stay as far back as a 7 earlier on.
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1958

Texas, USA

Best advice? Quit this forum.
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sgb2112

I never feel any aggression when doing cardio.

https://youtu.be/Ei_GRJLsD2w
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HeavyHitter32

sgb2112 wrote:
I never feel any aggression when doing cardio.



Yes, great stress reliever too...sometimes even more so for me than weights.
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Gainz

sgb2112 wrote:
I never feel any aggression when doing cardio.

https://youtu.be/...RJLsD2w


I can certainly vouch for this too
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NewYorker

New York, USA

LOL
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NewYorker

New York, USA

I never fight with anyone, even total assholes.
I sorta recommend doing the same.
True just walking away
I have no idea why intense exercise would cause aggression, but some cardio is good for everything. Even a brisk walk.
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hit4me

Florida, USA

martial arts training should be able to help you control your anger
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PTDaniel

Intense exercise usually gives me an acute sense of serenity and a positive mood. I notice a longer term affect with regular lower intensity exercise such as riding a bicycle, especially if it is done outdoors.
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Jesse Lee Otis

All -

Thanks for the feedback. It seems that the general response to training is a serene feeling - and I remember reading that in a muscle mag years ago. It is puzzling to me why I respond as I do - with anger at things that wouldn't bother the great majority of people.

Maybe some kind of meds would help me.


Jesse Lee
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Rationaltrainer

It all depends on myriad physiological factors like your hormonal profile, age, health and your psychological disposition. I am one of Those individuals who feel angry most of the time when they train Intensely. I have very low tolerance for stress and, aside from the momentary elation I feel after taking a walk, I don't have any serene feelings to report post-workout. I marvel at people who say they feel relaxed by exercise. I may feel a temporary release of tension but long term I don't have any positive behavioral changes. I feel morose and Irritable.
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