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John Little Wrong on Cardio ?
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DuzHIT

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
To show the level of inaccuracy Little is capable of, on page 6 of his new book THE TIME SAVERS WORKOUT, he mentions professor Jamie Simmons work of how a few minutes of exercise ( 3 minutes of cycling) can bestow all the benefits exercise can give. He then incredibly implies resistance training can do the same. Professor Simmons uses cycling, a totally different means of exercise. This is dishonest reporting.


Once again, misdirection. Some respondents, including Dr. Tom Mosely, tried the 3 minute cycling method 3 times a week for 4 weeks, and stated insulin sensitivity improved by 24%. However, in the four weeks, fitness did not improve. Others stated that fitness improved somewhat. So Little's method might or might not give the same improvements or better.

I have not and probably will not read the book, and will not endeavor to attempt his workout plans. I am happy with my current program and will continue as long as I make structural and cv progress.

I guess trollers gotta troll, so let's see whatcha got next.
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Chris H

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
ptcrusader wrote:

Now perhaps someone can explain anatomically why cardio seems to be important.



Ok

1) exercise is a stimulus

A) resistance training stimulates muscles to grow larger and stronger

B) cardiovascular conditioning causes the heart and blood vessels to flow more blood to the lungs and body tissues, resulting in blood vessels being more pliable and also increases blood return to the heart. This stimulates eccentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle of the heart.. and... increases cardiac output.

Q - "does this not also happen when lifting - I.E -to flow more blood to te lungs and body tissues" ?

2) Cardiovascular conditioning requires the major muscles used simultaneously in a rhythmic fashion by way of a rapid relaxation/contraction of these major muscles.

Q"again does this not, or can this not also occur whilst lifting" ?

3) prolonged contraction of muscle tissue impedes blood flow resulting in a decrease of blood flow returning to the heart. This also increases blood pressure greatly, and causes the blood vessels to stiffen.

Q "please define prolonged contraction of muscle tissue" ?
Most protocols even high rep, outside of SS are over in under a minute. Surely that does not constitute prolonged" ?

4) decreased return blood flow to the heart allows incomplete filling of the left ventricle, thus impeding cardiac output.

Q "considering the definition of prolonged above, does this really happen, to any meaningful extent when lifting"

5) Resistance training requires increased pulse pressure to infuse oxygen perfusion of distal tissues. This increases diameter of central blood vessels and the resultant decreased pliability. This also result in increased left ventricular hypertrophy without the accompanying increase in diameter that cardiovascular conditioning training causes.

Q "arterial stiffening" -assume this is the explanation of how and why.
But does this really occur, or occur to any significant degree when lifting, for the normal masses on basic 1 -3 day a week, relatively short training routines. Hour tops, but most far less" ?

Folks,

It has to do with blood flow. Cardio is good at this, resistance training is not.

"Marc, thanks for putting this up. My comments have not been made for the sake of argument, but understanding"



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Chris H

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
For inept intellectual HIT aficionados, resistance training that increases muscle mass may play a role in cardiovascular fitness heretofore unheralded by your ilk.
The increased muscle mass and resultant capillaries allow additional area for blood flow to travel or pool. This additional increased area allows for a decline in the blood pressure gradient. Good news!
You do not hear that info from inept HIT ilk.


Hi Marc, - this earlier post confused me also.
Here you state lifting {resistance training} may be beneficial to the cardiovascular system.
But if lifting causes arterial stiffening, how can that be true ?
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

he mentions professor Jamie Simmons work of how a few minutes of exercise ( 3 minutes of cycling) can bestow all the benefits exercise can give.

==Scott==
On the same token 3 minutes of study is all anyone needs to have their brain functioning at 100% !
Scott
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Chris H

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
ptcrusader wrote:

Now perhaps someone can explain anatomically why cardio seems to be important.



Ok

1) exercise is a stimulus

A) resistance training stimulates muscles to grow larger and stronger

B) cardiovascular conditioning causes the heart and blood vessels to flow more blood to the lungs and body tissues, resulting in blood vessels being more pliable and also increases blood return to the heart. This stimulates eccentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle of the heart.. and... increases cardiac output.

2) Cardiovascular conditioning requires the major muscles used simultaneously in a rhythmic fashion by way of a rapid relaxation/contraction of these major muscles.

3) prolonged contraction of muscle tissue impedes blood flow resulting in a decrease of blood flow returning to the heart. This also increases blood pressure greatly, and causes the blood vessels to stiffen.

4) decreased return blood flow to the heart allows incomplete filling of the left ventricle, thus impeding cardiac output.

5) Resistance training requires increased pulse pressure to infuse oxygen perfusion of distal tissues. This increases diameter of central blood vessels and the resultant decreased pliability. This also result in increased left ventricular hypertrophy without the accompanying increase in diameter that cardiovascular conditioning training causes.

Folks,

It has to do with blood flow. Cardio is good at this, resistance training is not.



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epdavis7

DuzHIT wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
To show the level of inaccuracy Little is capable of, on page 6 of his new book THE TIME SAVERS WORKOUT, he mentions professor Jamie Simmons work of how a few minutes of exercise ( 3 minutes of cycling) can bestow all the benefits exercise can give. He then incredibly implies resistance training can do the same. Professor Simmons uses cycling, a totally different means of exercise. This is dishonest reporting.

Once again, misdirection. Some respondents, including Dr. Tom Mosely, tried the 3 minute cycling method 3 times a week for 4 weeks, and stated insulin sensitivity improved by 24%. However, in the four weeks, fitness did not improve. Others stated that fitness improved somewhat. So Little's method might or might not give the same improvements or better.

I have not and probably will not read the book, and will not endeavor to attempt his workout plans. I am happy with my current program and will continue as long as I make structural and cv progress.

I guess trollers gotta troll, so let's see whatcha got next.


I've never been a fan of the Max Pyramid protocol, but thats just because I can't get a feel of it. The primary method in the book is the Delorme and Watkins method which is basically three sets of 10 at regular rep speeds 1 second up 2 seconds down. You basically do set 1 at 50% of 10RM, rest 30 seconds, set 2 at 75% of 10RM, rest 30 seconds and then do set three at 100% of 10RM. Do 3-5 exercises (or more if you are energetic and have something left in the tank). There's so much more in the book than just the workout programs. They do cover Max Pyramid and the Done in one protocol as well. The workout section of the book is just a small piece of it.
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ATP 4 Vitality

Chris H wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
For inept intellectual HIT aficionados, resistance training that increases muscle mass may play a role in cardiovascular fitness heretofore unheralded by your ilk.
The increased muscle mass and resultant capillaries allow additional area for blood flow to travel or pool. This additional increased area allows for a decline in the blood pressure gradient. Good news!
You do not hear that info from inept HIT ilk.

Hi Marc, - this earlier post confused me also.
Here you state lifting {resistance training} may be beneficial to the cardiovascular system.
But if lifting causes arterial stiffening, how can that be true ?


I previously discussed this:

ATP 4 Vitality
03/11/19
10:49 PM


Resistance training and HIIT provide unique benefits. These activities engage the type 2 muscle fibers better than LISS. What you engage you train. The engagement of fast twitch muscle fibers prompts a hypertrophy of these exact fibers. The resultant increase of muscle mass is accompanied by more blood vessels and storage for glycogen. This drops blood pressure. Thus we have more dual purpose muscle fibers which drop blood pressure and increase strength which can decrease the stress on the heart.

Resistance training increases central arterial stiffness. This very stiffness will enable a stronger heart to propel blood flow to distal areas like the hands, feet, and do not forget the penis. The will oxygenate tissues in the distal part of the body.


Resistance training while temporarily greatly increasing blood pressure, causes a slight drop in blood pressure, perhaps resetting the bodys set point controlled by the brain. No one knows for certain. I do not know.

Resistance training targets fast twitch fibers which are full of glycogen (ATP for energy here), and a full on HIT workout can deplete this intramuscular glycogen greatly. The muscles will adapt here also and pull energy from stored fat and from glucose in the bloodstream. This shift reduces water in the bloodstream, thereby decreasing blood pressure again. This will also improve insulin sensitivity. Win win!


HIT should find out how much LISS will promote this shift. HIT and cardio should be ideal teammates!
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ptcrusader

Recent study on swimming v running and heart function.

https://www.frontiersin.org/...2018.01700/full

After reading more on the topic, intuitively the best thing for our health may be to strength train and do cardio. The caveat is that what cardio you do may make a difference when it comes to its affect on the left ventricle.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

ptcrusader wrote:
Recent study on swimming v running and heart function.

https://www.frontiersin.org/...2018.01700/full

After reading more on the topic, intuitively the best thing for our health may be to strength train and do cardio. The caveat is that what cardio you do may make a difference when it comes to its affect on the left ventricle.


==Scott==
More than likely swimming is one of the best cardio exercises but the problem is it's so much trouble to do. You have to drive to the pool, go through all the rigamarole of suiting up, swimming etc and then drive home. You have to be really dedicated to keep at it. To run or erg/row you just run out the door or jump on the erg in your back yard.Besides the time involved in swimming I just found it plain boring, lap after lap , back and forth in the pool.You gotta really love to swim to put up with that.
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hit4me

Florida, USA

entsminger wrote:
ptcrusader wrote:
Recent study on swimming v running and heart function.

https://www.frontiersin.org/...2018.01700/full

After reading more on the topic, intuitively the best thing for our health may be to strength train and do cardio. The caveat is that what cardio you do may make a difference when it comes to its affect on the left ventricle.

==Scott==
More than likely swimming is one of the best cardio exercises but the problem is it's so much trouble to do. You have to drive to the pool, go through all the rigamarole of suiting up, swimming etc and then drive home. You have to be really dedicated to keep at it. To run or erg/row you just run out the door or jump on the erg in your back yard.Besides the time involved in swimming I just found it plain boring, lap after lap , back and forth in the pool.You gotta really love to swim to put up with that.


or be a Johnny Weissmuller fan and pretend the croc's are chasing you, lol
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epdavis7

entsminger wrote:
ptcrusader wrote:
Recent study on swimming v running and heart function.

https://www.frontiersin.org/...2018.01700/full

After reading more on the topic, intuitively the best thing for our health may be to strength train and do cardio. The caveat is that what cardio you do may make a difference when it comes to its affect on the left ventricle.

==Scott==
More than likely swimming is one of the best cardio exercises but the problem is it's so much trouble to do. You have to drive to the pool, go through all the rigamarole of suiting up, swimming etc and then drive home. You have to be really dedicated to keep at it. To run or erg/row you just run out the door or jump on the erg in your back yard.Besides the time involved in swimming I just found it plain boring, lap after lap , back and forth in the pool.You gotta really love to swim to put up with that.


Hence me losing interest in triathlons. I preferred ocean swimming over pool swimming. If I had a pool in my backyard I might have kept at it. Not interstate in swimming anymore beyond survival swimming which is a different animal. I still ride a mountain bike for recreation. Running is simpler. I always wanted to do a full Ironman, but probably not going to happen.
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Chris H

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Chris H wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
For inept intellectual HIT aficionados, resistance training that increases muscle mass may play a role in cardiovascular fitness heretofore unheralded by your ilk.
The increased muscle mass and resultant capillaries allow additional area for blood flow to travel or pool. This additional increased area allows for a decline in the blood pressure gradient. Good news!
You do not hear that info from inept HIT ilk.

Hi Marc, - this earlier post confused me also.
Here you state lifting {resistance training} may be beneficial to the cardiovascular system.
But if lifting causes arterial stiffening, how can that be true ?

I previously discussed this:

ATP 4 Vitality
03/11/19
10:49 PM


Resistance training and HIIT provide unique benefits. These activities engage the type 2 muscle fibers better than LISS. What you engage you train. The engagement of fast twitch muscle fibers prompts a hypertrophy of these exact fibers. The resultant increase of muscle mass is accompanied by more blood vessels and storage for glycogen. This drops blood pressure. Thus we have more dual purpose muscle fibers which drop blood pressure and increase strength which can decrease the stress on the heart.

Resistance training increases central arterial stiffness. This very stiffness will enable a stronger heart to propel blood flow to distal areas like the hands, feet, and do not forget the penis. The will oxygenate tissues in the distal part of the body.


Resistance training while temporarily greatly increasing blood pressure, causes a slight drop in blood pressure, perhaps resetting the bodys set point controlled by the brain. No one knows for certain. I do not know.

Resistance training targets fast twitch fibers which are full of glycogen (ATP for energy here), and a full on HIT workout can deplete this intramuscular glycogen greatly. The muscles will adapt here also and pull energy from stored fat and from glucose in the bloodstream. This shift reduces water in the bloodstream, thereby decreasing blood pressure again. This will also improve insulin sensitivity. Win win!


HIT should find out how much LISS will promote this shift. HIT and cardio should be ideal teammates!


Thanks Marc, you detailed response here is appreciated.

I know it takes time and thought to put it together, but if dont mind i have some more questions.

Firstly i responded to a previous post of yours at 5.42 on the 10th.
Can you comment on that please.

Also PHA - Peripheral heart Action training. Could this be done as or considered as cardio training ?

Lastly i recall you saying that heavy lifting may to be factor in torn retina's.
I had this to both eyes in 2017, 4 months apart.
I had underlying issues, myopic and a genetic cornea condition, so had a higher chance of having retina issues also.
i did some research and spoke to my specialists {surgeons} who both dismissed lifting as a factor.
What are you thoughts
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

epdavis7 wrote:
entsminger wrote:
ptcrusader wrote:
Recent study on swimming v running and heart function.

https://www.frontiersin.org/...2018.01700/full

After reading more on the topic, intuitively the best thing for our health may be to strength train and do cardio. The caveat is that what cardio you do may make a difference when it comes to its affect on the left ventricle.

==Scott==
More than likely swimming is one of the best cardio exercises but the problem is it's so much trouble to do. You have to drive to the pool, go through all the rigamarole of suiting up, swimming etc and then drive home. You have to be really dedicated to keep at it. To run or erg/row you just run out the door or jump on the erg in your back yard.Besides the time involved in swimming I just found it plain boring, lap after lap , back and forth in the pool.You gotta really love to swim to put up with that.

Hence me losing interest in triathlons. I preferred ocean swimming over pool swimming. If I had a pool in my backyard I might have kept at it. Not interstate in swimming anymore beyond survival swimming which is a different animal. I still ride a mountain bike for recreation. Running is simpler. I always wanted to do a full Ironman, but probably not going to happen.


==Scott==
I used to swim a mile in the county pool at least 3 times a week. Most of the times there were so many people doing laps you would be in a lane with 3 or 4 people trying not to crawl over each other. I dreaded it.It was fun swimming in a lake but they'd kick us out. I have a pool that's about 20 feet across but not big enough for real laps. Sometimes I'd tie a rope around my waist and swim in place. That was extremely boring, ha ha. Several bad bike wrecks ended my triathlon hopes.I was best at the bike part but would often push it to far.
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ATP 4 Vitality

Average Al wrote:
Marc: Regarding your status as most hated poster...

Having followed your comments on BBS, here, and Corporate Warrior, I believe that the poor reception you sometimes get is more a consequence of the style and tone of your posts, than the content. IMO, you are over-zealous in promoting your idea of the truth, and become a disruptive presence in so far as the board owner is concerned. These people are under no obligation to pay for a website and forum so that you can vent about your favorite issues.

If you really feel that strongly about these issues, start your own web site, publish your own fitness book, run your own discussion forum, attract your own audience.

Personally speaking, I do not always agree with McGuff, and I have stated some disagreements here and elsewhere. But I also find that I need to constantly remind myself that it is much easier to be an anonymous critic picking apart other peoples work, than it is to publish opinions and ideas under one's own name, for everyone else to pick apart.





I tried a web site .... I never had time enough


Book, maybe, as most subjects on exercise are well researched .... but what I write here ...people like to read. Arthur said there was not much new in exercise. And far from what Little states in - The Time Saving Workout - the future of exercise is not Solus, or any other overpriced electronic gizmos.

I am currently involved in developing procedures to minimize blood loss/use in trauma, injuries, and even chronic illness. This is important as is cardiovascular health. One patient with numerous falls and hip replacements recently lost about a thimbleful of blood in his latest hip replacement sortie.


No thanks on any discussion forum, for fear of dealing with someone like myself lol!


I want NO audience. I seek anonymity at all times.
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ATP 4 Vitality

Chris H wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Chris H wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
For inept intellectual HIT aficionados, resistance training that increases muscle mass may play a role in cardiovascular fitness heretofore unheralded by your ilk.
The increased muscle mass and resultant capillaries allow additional area for blood flow to travel or pool. This additional increased area allows for a decline in the blood pressure gradient. Good news!
You do not hear that info from inept HIT ilk.

Hi Marc, - this earlier post confused me also.
Here you state lifting {resistance training} may be beneficial to the cardiovascular system.
But if lifting causes arterial stiffening, how can that be true ?

I previously discussed this:

ATP 4 Vitality
03/11/19
10:49 PM


Resistance training and HIIT provide unique benefits. These activities engage the type 2 muscle fibers better than LISS. What you engage you train. The engagement of fast twitch muscle fibers prompts a hypertrophy of these exact fibers. The resultant increase of muscle mass is accompanied by more blood vessels and storage for glycogen. This drops blood pressure. Thus we have more dual purpose muscle fibers which drop blood pressure and increase strength which can decrease the stress on the heart.

Resistance training increases central arterial stiffness. This very stiffness will enable a stronger heart to propel blood flow to distal areas like the hands, feet, and do not forget the penis. The will oxygenate tissues in the distal part of the body.


Resistance training while temporarily greatly increasing blood pressure, causes a slight drop in blood pressure, perhaps resetting the bodys set point controlled by the brain. No one knows for certain. I do not know.

Resistance training targets fast twitch fibers which are full of glycogen (ATP for energy here), and a full on HIT workout can deplete this intramuscular glycogen greatly. The muscles will adapt here also and pull energy from stored fat and from glucose in the bloodstream. This shift reduces water in the bloodstream, thereby decreasing blood pressure again. This will also improve insulin sensitivity. Win win!


HIT should find out how much LISS will promote this shift. HIT and cardio should be ideal teammates!

Thanks Marc, you detailed response here is appreciated.

I know it takes time and thought to put it together, but if dont mind i have some more questions.

Firstly i responded to a previous post of yours at 5.42 on the 10th.
Can you comment on that please.



Could you please repeat your ?



Also PHA - Peripheral heart Action training. Could this be done as or considered as cardio training ?



No!
Prolonged muscular contractions such as occurring during each barbell or machine exercise impedes blood flow, thereby decreasing preload to the heart. This does not increase cardiac output although the heart rate will be quite high in an attempt by the heart to increase blood flow to these tissues and infuse oxygen. If a high percentage of maximum weight is used and/or muscular failure is actually reached, then a natural phenomenon called the Valsalva maneuver occurs, a protective mechanism, whereby the core muscles isometrically contract, thereby greatly impeding blood flow return back to the heart. Thus, a great decrease in cardiac output occurs with an accompanying increased heart rate, but no cardiovascular conditioning increase can occur under these circumstances.


Lastly i recall you saying that heavy lifting may to be factor in torn retina's.
I had this to both eyes in 2017, 4 months apart.
I had underlying issues, myopic and a genetic cornea condition, so had a higher chance of having retina issues also.
i did some research and spoke to my specialists {surgeons} who both dismissed lifting as a factor.
What are you thoughts


Do what your Dr. says. Be that ideal patient!
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Resultsbased

Staying anonymous has its appeal...especially when claiming things like weight training is bad for the heart or having a 22" neck.

What a laugh.
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ATP 4 Vitality

Resultsbased wrote:
Staying anonymous has its appeal...especially when claiming things like weight training is bad for the heart or having a 22" neck.

What a laugh.


The laughter you are hearing is about the - Time Saving workout!
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epdavis7

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Resultsbased wrote:
Staying anonymous has its appeal...especially when claiming things like weight training is bad for the heart or having a 22" neck.

What a laugh.

That is laughter you are hearing is about the - Time Saving workout!


Great book. I don't agree with everything, but lots of really good information. Absorb what is useful to you.
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epdavis7

Although I liked the book overall, I have a bone to pick. Some of the pictures demonstrating the technique of some of the free weight exercises was terrible, particularly the deadlifts and rows. Additionally, if you are going to do squats, you either need a squat rack or a hip belt squat apparatus to squat effectively. Most people will never be able to power-clean a heavy enough weight to make squats effective. There is risk associated with power-cleans also. I liked BBS overall as well, but the technique on squats and deadlifts in that book was awful also. In all fairness, the authors train primarily on machines, so they?ve probably lost the technique/skill over the years. I would have chosen a HIT guy who primarily trains on free weights to demonstrate those exercises. This does not invalidate the rest of the book, but it is something detractors are going to focus on unfortunately.
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Chris H

@ ATP

Hi Marc, - thanks again for everything thus far.

from before, can you define "prolonged muscular contraction" in context of lifting and negative CV effects.
Most sets are over in way under a minute, which surely by definition is not prolonged ?

i'm looking at different options of additional cv work,
don't have time or access for the pool, certainly ain't riding in London traffic, and at at 230 pounds, jogging and my joints will not go well together,
You said no to PHA, but what about light circuits , C&J's, KB swings, shadow boxing, farmers walks with light loads etc etc
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ATP 4 Vitality

Little butchers the conservation of energy phenomenon. This is actually a principle stating that energy cannot be created or destroyed, but can be altered from one form to another. Dr. Darden does a much better job explaining and applying this principle of energy. What Little states about this is his unproven opinion, A.K.A as hogwash.
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ATP 4 Vitality

Chris H wrote:
@ ATP

Hi Marc, - thanks again for everything thus far.

from before, can you define "prolonged muscular contraction" in context of lifting and negative CV effects.
Most sets are over in way under a minute, which surely by definition is not prolonged ?

i'm looking at different options of additional cv work,
don't have time or access for the pool, certainly ain't riding in London traffic, and at at 230 pounds, jogging and my joints will not go well together,
You said no to PHA, but what about light circuits , C&J's, KB swings, shadow boxing, farmers walks with light loads etc etc


The best exercises for conditioning your cardiovascular system are running, rowing, cross-country skiing, cycling.

Cardiovascular conditioning should involve half of the trainees available muscle mass simultaneously,

And,

There should be a rapid rhythmical contraction/relaxation of agonist and antagonist muscles

And,

Unimpeded proper ventilation. No Valsalva!

On a personal note, I like my Assault Bike. I have tried and like the Concept 2 rower and the Ski Erg.
I have rigged 2 light resistance bands for a poor mans Ski Erg.
One of the very best cardiovascular conditioning tools used is when I used a short revolving straight lat pull down handle, hooked to a carabiner and a short piece of chain, hooked to a loading pin. Then do kettle bell swings. The carabiner, chain and revolving handle allow momentum to be properly utilized, thusly allowing a very rapid contraction/relaxation cycle of a large muscle mass group, the posterior chain. The calves, the 2nd heart, is also worked to improve blood return. Cheap and beats the heck out of Solus.
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Chris H

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Chris H wrote:
@ ATP

Hi Marc, - thanks again for everything thus far.

from before, can you define "prolonged muscular contraction" in context of lifting and negative CV effects.
Most sets are over in way under a minute, which surely by definition is not prolonged ?

i'm looking at different options of additional cv work,
don't have time or access for the pool, certainly ain't riding in London traffic, and at at 230 pounds, jogging and my joints will not go well together,
You said no to PHA, but what about light circuits , C&J's, KB swings, shadow boxing, farmers walks with light loads etc etc

The best exercises for conditioning your cardiovascular system are running, rowing, cross-country skiing, cycling.

Cardiovascular conditioning should involve half of the trainees available muscle mass simultaneously,

And,

There should be a rapid rhythmical contraction/relaxation of agonist and antagonist muscles

And,

Unimpeded proper ventilation. No Valsalva!

On a personal note, I like my Assault Bike. I have tried and like the Concept 2 rower and the Ski Erg.
I have rigged 2 light resistance bands for a poor mans Ski Erg.
One of the very best cardiovascular conditioning tools used is when I used a short revolving straight lat pull down handle, hooked to a carabiner and a short piece of chain, hooked to a loading pin. Then do kettle bell swings. The carabiner, chain and revolving handle allow momentum to be properly utilized, thusly allowing a very rapid contraction/relaxation cycle of a large muscle mass group, the posterior chain. The calves, the 2nd heart, is also worked to improve blood return. Cheap and beats the heck out of Solus.


thanks Marc appreciated again.

Less i have missed it {more than possible} you don't appear to have addressed the prolonged muscular contraction query i raised ?
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ATP 4 Vitality

Chris H wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:

Less i have missed it {more than possible} you don't appear to have addressed the prolonged muscular contraction query i raised ?


I believe I have said what is needed

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Chris H

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Chris H wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:

Less i have missed it {more than possible} you don't appear to have addressed the prolonged muscular contraction query i raised ?

I believe I have said what is needed



Hi Marc,

you indeed have said what is net one to think.

Context here is time. A HITERS or for that matter most recreational lifters, overall time under load per week/month/year i seriously doubt would elicit a permanent negative effect, irrespective of the internal mechanisms when lifting. However the caveat would be as long as one eats healthfully and is generally active.

Again time in context of aerobic exercise.
How much ?
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