MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Nwlifter

I'm not sure what the deal is with how people apply some of the routines, I always thought the really bare minimum stuff was for people like that Racy guy he mentions, where maybe, if your that bad at recovering, you might at least gain 'something'...

I bet Dr. Darden could confirm that for really working a muscle even 'HD style', Mike and Ray did a lot more than that. Look at page 168 of Darden's 'The Nautilus Advanced Bodybuilding Book', he shows the routine Ray did for arms, and it wasn't one set of chinups... it was tri-set for biceps and a triset for triceps. Add in his compounds for upper body (rows? presses? etc.) and his bis and tris probably ended up with 5-6 sets , to failure, each.
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ron33

One of the first Mentzer routines I did , 2 progressively heavier warm up sets done in superset fashion, with one set max reps , worked GREAT for me . I used that method for several yrs. with constant progress , till becoming ill and not being able to train . Later when trying to return t training used , his consolidated routine , in circuit fashion to try get back health and some strength , also with results . Like others have said , have to adapt to your personal needs . Mentzer also recommended that method .
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Bastion

It all depends on how hard YOU train.
I had been a staunch 3x a week trainee for many years, which worked great for the first few years. I made zero progress for almost 2 years by keeping the same frequency, basically lifting the same thing week in and week out. Started to regress on a few movements until the beginning of February, I decided to space my workouts out by taking 3 days off after each workout, and in just a few months I've reached several PR's and am making gains again. I think training once a week on split is a bit extreme, but if training full body, at the most every 4-5 days would be a starting point for me. I've recently for the past 2 months been making good gains training each bodypart every 10-12 days. I used to think training once or twice a week was a joke, but as I've gotten stronger over the years, I realise it becomes necessary if you want to progress rather than just clock workouts in and out.
As for the Heavy duty 2 split. A simple starting point I think is, for example..
Wed - legs
Sun- chest and back or delts and arms. Alternated weekly.
Or even simpler, just a plain old upper lower split , as many dont see a need for a delt and arm day, when you can most likely finish em off with a set or 2 after training chest and back.
If this style of training appeals to you, I strongly suggest reading material from John Heart and Chad Shaw, both lifetime drug free competitors who practice this.
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ron33

Thanks for suggestion , Will Do.
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hdlifter

Bastion wrote:
It all depends on how hard YOU train.
I had been a staunch 3x a week trainee for many years, which worked great for the first few years. I made zero progress for almost 2 years by keeping the same frequency, basically lifting the same thing week in and week out. Started to regress on a few movements until the beginning of February, I decided to space my workouts out by taking 3 days off after each workout, and in just a few months I've reached several PR's and am making gains again. I think training once a week on split is a bit extreme, but if training full body, at the most every 4-5 days would be a starting point for me. I've recently for the past 2 months been making good gains training each bodypart every 10-12 days. I used to think training once or twice a week was a joke, but as I've gotten stronger over the years, I realise it becomes necessary if you want to progress rather than just clock workouts in and out.
As for the Heavy duty 2 split. A simple starting point I think is, for example..
Wed - legs
Sun- chest and back or delts and arms. Alternated weekly.
Or even simpler, just a plain old upper lower split , as many dont see a need for a delt and arm day, when you can most likely finish em off with a set or 2 after training chest and back.
If this style of training appeals to you, I strongly suggest reading material from John Heart and Chad Shaw, both lifetime drug free competitors who practice this.


You have the smarts and know how it is. And you aren't alone with extended recovery. More power to you Bastion!
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Nwlifter

Bastion wrote:
It all depends on how hard YOU train.
I had been a staunch 3x a week trainee for many years, which worked great for the first few years. I made zero progress for almost 2 years by keeping the same frequency, basically lifting the same thing week in and week out. Started to regress on a few movements until the beginning of February, I decided to space my workouts out by taking 3 days off after each workout, and in just a few months I've reached several PR's and am making gains again. I think training once a week on split is a bit extreme, but if training full body, at the most every 4-5 days would be a starting point for me. I've recently for the past 2 months been making good gains training each bodypart every 10-12 days. I used to think training once or twice a week was a joke, but as I've gotten stronger over the years, I realise it becomes necessary if you want to progress rather than just clock workouts in and out.
As for the Heavy duty 2 split. A simple starting point I think is, for example..
Wed - legs
Sun- chest and back or delts and arms. Alternated weekly.
Or even simpler, just a plain old upper lower split , as many dont see a need for a delt and arm day, when you can most likely finish em off with a set or 2 after training chest and back.
If this style of training appeals to you, I strongly suggest reading material from John Heart and Chad Shaw, both lifetime drug free competitors who practice this.


Oh wow never heard of Chad Shaw, looked him up, interesting...

I found this info.

http://www.cutandjacked.com/...w-with-ChadShaw

My workouts are brief, usually around 30 minutes. That may not sound like much that the intensity level of my workouts is very brutal! I like to use rest/pauses, drop sets, and partial reps, to ensure that I've drawn every last drop of blood on each, and every set that I possibly can.

Week 1 ? I train Arms on Tues, then Hamstrings & Calves on Saturday.

Week 2 ? I train Shoulders on Tuesday, then on Saturday I train Quadriceps & Calves.

Week 3 ? I train Chest on Tuesday, then I train Back on Saturday.

Week 4 ? I begin the rotation all over again with Arms on Tuesday (But will begin the next cycle with training Quadriceps on Saturday.
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Bastion

Nwlifter wrote:
Bastion wrote:
It all depends on how hard YOU train.
I had been a staunch 3x a week trainee for many years, which worked great for the first few years. I made zero progress for almost 2 years by keeping the same frequency, basically lifting the same thing week in and week out. Started to regress on a few movements until the beginning of February, I decided to space my workouts out by taking 3 days off after each workout, and in just a few months I've reached several PR's and am making gains again. I think training once a week on split is a bit extreme, but if training full body, at the most every 4-5 days would be a starting point for me. I've recently for the past 2 months been making good gains training each bodypart every 10-12 days. I used to think training once or twice a week was a joke, but as I've gotten stronger over the years, I realise it becomes necessary if you want to progress rather than just clock workouts in and out.
As for the Heavy duty 2 split. A simple starting point I think is, for example..
Wed - legs
Sun- chest and back or delts and arms. Alternated weekly.
Or even simpler, just a plain old upper lower split , as many dont see a need for a delt and arm day, when you can most likely finish em off with a set or 2 after training chest and back.
If this style of training appeals to you, I strongly suggest reading material from John Heart and Chad Shaw, both lifetime drug free competitors who practice this.


Oh wow never heard of Chad Shaw, looked him up, interesting...

I found this info.

http://www.cutandjacked.com/...w-with-ChadShaw

My workouts are brief, usually around 30 minutes. That may not sound like much that the intensity level of my workouts is very brutal! I like to use rest/pauses, drop sets, and partial reps, to ensure that I've drawn every last drop of blood on each, and every set that I possibly can.

Week 1 ? I train Arms on Tues, then Hamstrings & Calves on Saturday.

Week 2 ? I train Shoulders on Tuesday, then on Saturday I train Quadriceps & Calves.

Week 3 ? I train Chest on Tuesday, then I train Back on Saturday.

Week 4 ? I begin the rotation all over again with Arms on Tuesday (But will begin the next cycle with training Quadriceps on Saturday.


It's interesting for sure. I'm not sure the majority of people would have to split things out that far, but it just shows what's possible. I think this guy trains for powerlifting meets as well, so if raw strength is a top priority, perhaps this much rest might be the way to go. Plus it allows you to be really creative with intensity techniques etc.
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HeavyHitter32

Bastion wrote:
It all depends on how hard YOU train.
I had been a staunch 3x a week trainee for many years, which worked great for the first few years. I made zero progress for almost 2 years by keeping the same frequency, basically lifting the same thing week in and week out. Started to regress on a few movements until the beginning of February, I decided to space my workouts out by taking 3 days off after each workout, and in just a few months I've reached several PR's and am making gains again. I think training once a week on split is a bit extreme, but if training full body, at the most every 4-5 days would be a starting point for me. I've recently for the past 2 months been making good gains training each bodypart every 10-12 days. I used to think training once or twice a week was a joke, but as I've gotten stronger over the years, I realise it becomes necessary if you want to progress rather than just clock workouts in and out.
As for the Heavy duty 2 split. A simple starting point I think is, for example..
Wed - legs
Sun- chest and back or delts and arms. Alternated weekly.
Or even simpler, just a plain old upper lower split , as many dont see a need for a delt and arm day, when you can most likely finish em off with a set or 2 after training chest and back.
If this style of training appeals to you, I strongly suggest reading material from John Heart and Chad Shaw, both lifetime drug free competitors who practice this.


Bastion,

Can you list out your exercises and sets (tactics, etc.) for recent workouts? Just curious, thanks.
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Nwlifter

Bastion wrote:
Nwlifter wrote:
Bastion wrote:
It all depends on how hard YOU train.
I had been a staunch 3x a week trainee for many years, which worked great for the first few years. I made zero progress for almost 2 years by keeping the same frequency, basically lifting the same thing week in and week out. Started to regress on a few movements until the beginning of February, I decided to space my workouts out by taking 3 days off after each workout, and in just a few months I've reached several PR's and am making gains again. I think training once a week on split is a bit extreme, but if training full body, at the most every 4-5 days would be a starting point for me. I've recently for the past 2 months been making good gains training each bodypart every 10-12 days. I used to think training once or twice a week was a joke, but as I've gotten stronger over the years, I realise it becomes necessary if you want to progress rather than just clock workouts in and out.
As for the Heavy duty 2 split. A simple starting point I think is, for example..
Wed - legs
Sun- chest and back or delts and arms. Alternated weekly.
Or even simpler, just a plain old upper lower split , as many dont see a need for a delt and arm day, when you can most likely finish em off with a set or 2 after training chest and back.
If this style of training appeals to you, I strongly suggest reading material from John Heart and Chad Shaw, both lifetime drug free competitors who practice this.


Oh wow never heard of Chad Shaw, looked him up, interesting...

I found this info.

http://www.cutandjacked.com/...w-with-ChadShaw

My workouts are brief, usually around 30 minutes. That may not sound like much that the intensity level of my workouts is very brutal! I like to use rest/pauses, drop sets, and partial reps, to ensure that I've drawn every last drop of blood on each, and every set that I possibly can.

Week 1 ? I train Arms on Tues, then Hamstrings & Calves on Saturday.

Week 2 ? I train Shoulders on Tuesday, then on Saturday I train Quadriceps & Calves.

Week 3 ? I train Chest on Tuesday, then I train Back on Saturday.

Week 4 ? I begin the rotation all over again with Arms on Tuesday (But will begin the next cycle with training Quadriceps on Saturday.

It's interesting for sure. I'm not sure the majority of people would have to split things out that far, but it just shows what's possible. I think this guy trains for powerlifting meets as well, so if raw strength is a top priority, perhaps this much rest might be the way to go. Plus it allows you to be really creative with intensity techniques etc.


OK true...
An email friend sent me another link, looks like at first he did everything all in one week, looked more like Mentzer's HD1 setup, maybe that's how he got most his size? then later must have reduced. it was an article called Chad Shaw's transformation or something like that.
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