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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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2/4 Tempo Origins
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Resultsbased

Recently, I've been messing around with different tempos. 2/4 seems almost perfect to me for most movements because it is about as fast as I can move while maintaining control on the positive and it accentuates the negative. It keeps sets from getting too long, too.

Was this Dr.Darden's concept initially?
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tensionstrength

Resultsbased wrote:
Recently, I've been messing around with different tempos. 2/4 seems almost perfect to me for most movements because it is about as fast as I can move while maintaining control on the positive and it accentuates the negative. It keeps sets from getting too long, too.

Was this Dr.Darden's concept initially?


I don't know if Dr. Darden originated it. If memory serves correct, he was advocating 2/4 in the '82? edition of The Nautilus Book. But I'm just going by my earliest exposure to his stuff.

Are you doing prestretch/myotatic reflex with the 2/4?
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Ellington Darden

I developed the 2/4 tempo concept back in 1974 at Nautilus. It seemed to get across the importance of taking a little longer on each negative movement.

Ellington

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Resultsbased

tensionstrength wrote:
Resultsbased wrote:
Recently, I've been messing around with different tempos. 2/4 seems almost perfect to me for most movements because it is about as fast as I can move while maintaining control on the positive and it accentuates the negative. It keeps sets from getting too long, too.

Was this Dr.Darden's concept initially?

I don't know if Dr. Darden originated it. If memory serves correct, he was advocating 2/4 in the '82? edition of The Nautilus Book. But I'm just going by my earliest exposure to his stuff.

Are you doing prestretch/myotatic reflex with the 2/4?


Yes, when possible. It really increases the intensity of each contraction.
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Resultsbased

Ellington Darden wrote:
I developed the 2/4 tempo concept back in 1974 at Nautilus. It seemed to get across the importance of taking a little longer on each negative movement.

Ellington



Thanks Dr. Darden. Fast forward 45 years and most of your recommendations are still spot on.

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Resultsbased

I just saw the "Growth Explosion " article on t nation today. The results are very impressive.

I am still having difficulty understanding how the negative isn't severely under loaded. I will try this in my next workout and experience it to better understand.
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tensionstrength

Resultsbased wrote:
I just saw the "Growth Explosion " article on t nation today. The results are very impressive.

I am still having difficulty understanding how the negative isn't severely under loaded. I will try this in my next workout and experience it to better understand.


I thought about this as well. Does the initial 30 second negative sort or serve as a warm up as well? Then you you do the much faster 10 reps, so by the time you get to the second 30 second negative the load will be much more imposing? Also would it be necessary to contract harder in ranges of exercises with a big leverage advantage?
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tensionstrength

Resultsbased wrote:
I just saw the "Growth Explosion " article on t nation today. The results are very impressive.

I am still having difficulty understanding how the negative isn't severely under loaded. I will try this in my next workout and experience it to better understand.


Does the initial 30 second contraction serve as sort of warm up as well? On the final 30 second contraction the load would be more imposing from fatigue and you could contract harder in the leverage advantaged ranges?
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Ellington Darden

tensionstrength wrote:
Resultsbased wrote:
I just saw the "Growth Explosion " article on t nation today. The results are very impressive.

I am still having difficulty understanding how the negative isn't severely under loaded. I will try this in my next workout and experience it to better understand.

Does the initial 30 second contraction serve as sort of warm up as well? On the final 30 second contraction the load would be more imposing from fatigue and you could contract harder in the leverage advantaged ranges?


Yes, I believe you've made a nice assessment of a set performed 30-10-30.

Ellington


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Resultsbased

30-10-30 experience:

I performed this on the following 3 movements: Life Fitness Leg Press, Hammer Strength Pulldown and Hammer Strength Chest Press.

There's no way I could have performed any more exercises with the appropriate level of effort. I feel like this is much better than the 30/30/30. Having those fast reps in between seems to cover all the bases and the slow reps especially the last make maximum moment arm really difficult.

So, it's not as "underloaded" as I expected. I'd recommend trying this out to anyone who's interested.
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