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Chris H

this is the second installment of the "is John Little"- right series" - lol

All jokes aside, this is a serious question.

Arthur Jones, said of the joints and lifting, that it was akin to pulling a rope over a rock, and hence over time wear and tear would occur.
A reason therefore to support the minimum dose for exercise etc etc

John Little in his new book refers to the joints as hinges and postulates on how many "openings" those joints have in them - I.E - Shelf life.

Are they right, or are they making incorrect assumptions even though based on logical evaluation.

The rope and rock analogy may be flawed as the rope and rock in question Is biological and hence lubricated and heals and regenerates at least to an extent.
Similarly for the hinge analogy.

Also as life span is finite in this context, is the wear and tear concern espoused by HIT guru's valid or over-blown.

I'm not dismissing the position, and i am a firm supporter of proper form, appropriate exercise selection, bio-mechanics and obviously an exercise dose response that meets ones goals, but has the over training, over reaching, injury prevention HIT position gone to far ?
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Average Al

I think you've already addressed the issue you've raised: analogies between passive structures that do not adjust to stress and living biological ones that have some capacity to respond to stress and heal from damage are going to be of limited use.

This is clearly a case where just because an argument looks logical, that doesn't mean it gives great insights.

As far as joints are concerned, it likely matters how much stress is applied to the joint, and how often. And the capacity of some joint tissues to heal does diminish with age.

I believe that there are studies which show that, if you compare active to sedentary children, the active kids reach adulthood with thicker cartilage in certain joints, like the knees. So perhaps being active, moving and running a certain amount when young may actually reduce your chances of knee joint problems later in life.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

== Scott==
When I see these articles saying don?t exercise to much or you?ll wear out your joints etc. I?m reminded of Jack LaLanne who swam from Alcatraz to shore at least 5 or 10 tiimes and some of those when he was about 80 and he was pulling a boat ! Even today I saw a story where they say no one could swim that and make it. I guess a lot depends on who you believe. There?s no question LaLanne did his feats and much more and he was no genetic freak.
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

entsminger wrote:
== Scott==
When I see these articles saying don?t exercise to much or you?ll wear out your joints etc. I?m reminded of Jack LaLanne who swam from Alcatraz to shore at least 5 or 10 tiimes and some of those when he was about 80 and he was pulling a boat ! Even today I saw a story where they say no one could swim that and make it. I guess a lot depends on who you believe. There?s no question LaLanne did his feats and much more and he was no genetic freak.


Sure he was a genetic freak. He was able to do things that no one else could do.
His muscles had to have been almost entirely or even entirely composed of slow twitch muscle fiber and I am sure he had other " unique " physical properties that no or very few others have.
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ptcrusader

Consider two main hypotheses concerning whether exercise causes osteoarthritis (wear and tear of the articular cartilage and muscle dysfunction.) Studies support the muscle dysfunction hypothesis over the wear and tear hypothesis.

Three cross sectional running studies concluded that exercise is not associated with OA; however, three running studies suggested that some higher intensity activities may be associated with the development of OA. (See "Muscle dysfunction versus wear and tear as a cause of exercise related osteoarthritis: an epidemiological update." by Ian Shrier

Shrier found there was no increased risk of OA in runners in four of seven historical cohort studies.

If you have osteoarthritis (OA) in your hips or knees, exercising may be the last thing you feel like doing.
But moving is important for hip and knee OA. It causes your joints to compress and release, bringing blood flow, nutrients, and oxygen into the cartilage. ?This can help prolong the function and longevity of your joints,? says Eric Robertson, DPT, a physical therapist and associate professor of clinical physical therapy at the University of Southern California.

Physical activity can improve your OA symptoms? like pain, stiffness, fatigue, and even depression, says Leigh F. Callahan, PhD, associate director of the University of North Carolina Thurston Arthritis Research Center. One study found that people with knee OA who worked out regularly lowered their pain by 12% compared to those who didn?t.

So the question becomes how much is too much? Specifically, Shrier found that high intensity sports such as soccer correlated with higher rates of osteoarthritis. So for those who squat, how heavy would the weight need to be to start increasing the risk of osteoarthritis?

Hinge? Perhaps joints are more like a plant bending in the wind. Only extremes seem to create a problem.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Bill Sekerak wrote:
entsminger wrote:
== Scott==
When I see these articles saying don?t exercise to much or you?ll wear out your joints etc. I?m reminded of Jack LaLanne who swam from Alcatraz to shore at least 5 or 10 tiimes and some of those when he was about 80 and he was pulling a boat ! Even today I saw a story where they say no one could swim that and make it. I guess a lot depends on who you believe. There?s no question LaLanne did his feats and much more and he was no genetic freak.

Sure he was a genetic freak. He was able to do things that no one else could do.
His muscles had to have been almost entirely or even entirely composed of slow twitch muscle fiber and I am sure he had other " unique " physical properties that no or very few others have.


==Scott==
Just because you can do something others cannot do doesn't make you a genetic freak. It's easy to chalk up someones success with talk of slow twitch fibers and such stuff ,to put it politely, but I think he was so successful because he worked so damn hard to do what he did.
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epdavis7

How much is too much is a good question? On the weight training front I am very minimalistic. I do however run races and train for them by running once a week which is very minimalistic from the typical higher mileage training programs you see. It was good enough for me to win 2nd place in my age group for a recent 20K I just did on a really hilly trail run in the sweltering heat (not saying much, there were only 11 people in the 50-54 age group lol). I do believe wear and tear is a valid concern. Where do you draw the line? I don't think anyone knows exactly and you have to pay close attention to your own body and heed the warning signals.
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backtrack

These same message reconfigured publications are the biggest scam there is going. I'm tired of the Matthew, Mark, Luke and John approach.
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Chris H

All, -thanks for your responses
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Chris H

backtrack wrote:
These same message reconfigured publications are the biggest scam there is going. I'm tired of the Matthew, Mark, Luke and John approach.


Hi backtrack, not sure i know what you mean Brother ?
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tensionstrength

ptcrusader wrote:
Consider two main hypotheses concerning whether exercise causes osteoarthritis (wear and tear of the articular cartilage and muscle dysfunction.) Studies support the muscle dysfunction hypothesis over the wear and tear hypothesis.

Three cross sectional running studies concluded that exercise is not associated with OA; however, three running studies suggested that some higher intensity activities may be associated with the development of OA. (See "Muscle dysfunction versus wear and tear as a cause of exercise related osteoarthritis: an epidemiological update." by Ian Shrier

Shrier found there was no increased risk of OA in runners in four of seven historical cohort studies.

If you have osteoarthritis (OA) in your hips or knees, exercising may be the last thing you feel like doing.
But moving is important for hip and knee OA. It causes your joints to compress and release, bringing blood flow, nutrients, and oxygen into the cartilage. ?This can help prolong the function and longevity of your joints,? says Eric Robertson, DPT, a physical therapist and associate professor of clinical physical therapy at the University of Southern California.

Physical activity can improve your OA symptoms? like pain, stiffness, fatigue, and even depression, says Leigh F. Callahan, PhD, associate director of the University of North Carolina Thurston Arthritis Research Center. One study found that people with knee OA who worked out regularly lowered their pain by 12% compared to those who didn?t.

So the question becomes how much is too much? Specifically, Shrier found that high intensity sports such as soccer correlated with higher rates of osteoarthritis. So for those who squat, how heavy would the weight need to be to start increasing the risk of osteoarthritis?

Hinge? Perhaps joints are more like a plant bending in the wind. Only extremes seem to create a problem.


Great post!
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tensionstrength

backtrack wrote:
These same message reconfigured publications are the biggest scam there is going. I'm tired of the Matthew, Mark, Luke and John approach.


Do you mean because he has put out a lot of books?
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sirloin

Chris H wrote:
this is the second installment of the "is John Little"- right series" - lol

All jokes aside, this is a serious question.

Arthur Jones, said of the joints and lifting, that it was akin to pulling a rope over a rock, and hence over time wear and tear would occur.
A reason therefore to support the minimum dose for exercise etc etc

John Little in his new book refers to the joints as hinges and postulates on how many "openings" those joints have in them - I.E - Shelf life.

Are they right, or are they making incorrect assumptions even though based on logical evaluation.

The rope and rock analogy may be flawed as the rope and rock in question Is biological and hence lubricated and heals and regenerates at least to an extent.
Similarly for the hinge analogy.

Also as life span is finite in this context, is the wear and tear concern espoused by HIT guru's valid or over-blown.

I'm not dismissing the position, and i am a firm supporter of proper form, appropriate exercise selection, bio-mechanics and obviously an exercise dose response that meets ones goals, but has the over training, over reaching, injury prevention HIT position gone to far ?


Hey bud,

Yes wear and tear, injury pervention, overtraining etc are important, but indeed there are HIT guru's / salesman that have taken things too far. As you know, theres even indivduals out there claiming unbelievable gains from preforming one set of partial deads every 3-6 months lol.
Im convinced the writers / salesman that have taken things too far dont actually like training, one stated years ago in an interview with Tony Robbins, "am someone who never actually liked being in a gym, i can think of 15-20 places id rather be". Mike Mentzer, did he even train? I heard it said he didnt train due to having back pain...as someone with a messed up back that does train, i dont buy it!

John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

These same writers / salesman over stress wear and tear / over training etc as a way to get people on board with their minimalistic way of thinking. Admittedly, when i was working 50-60 hours a weeks in a physically taxing jobs, this kind of minimalistic appoarch had its place.
But as soon as i had more time and energy on my hands, i upped my training frequency and volume considerably, and for that, am much stronger, have less back pain and have better health makers.

Best
Rab


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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Bill Sekerak wrote:
entsminger wrote:
== Scott==
When I see these articles saying don?t exercise to much or you?ll wear out your joints etc. I?m reminded of Jack LaLanne who swam from Alcatraz to shore at least 5 or 10 tiimes and some of those when he was about 80 and he was pulling a boat ! Even today I saw a story where they say no one could swim that and make it. I guess a lot depends on who you believe. There?s no question LaLanne did his feats and much more and he was no genetic freak.

Sure he was a genetic freak. He was able to do things that no one else could do.
His muscles had to have been almost entirely or even entirely composed of slow twitch muscle fiber and I am sure he had other " unique " physical properties that no or very few others have.


==Scott==
If I recall correctly LaLanne was sickly and under par as a youth. I believe the unique properties he possessed that most of us don?t is his dogged determination to do what he set out to do!
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

==Scott==

I think it becomes a problem for these trainers who choose the life of training people to build muscle when they realize they have to keep coming up with new stuff to attract clients and in reality very little out there is new stuff. They need to sell a new book so they conjure up some fancy routine that really doesn't produce any better results than a basic workout. Then what? They drink, ha ha!
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Chris H

sirloin wrote:
Chris H wrote:
this is the second installment of the "is John Little"- right series" - lol

All jokes aside, this is a serious question.

Arthur Jones, said of the joints and lifting, that it was akin to pulling a rope over a rock, and hence over time wear and tear would occur.
A reason therefore to support the minimum dose for exercise etc etc

John Little in his new book refers to the joints as hinges and postulates on how many "openings" those joints have in them - I.E - Shelf life.

Are they right, or are they making incorrect assumptions even though based on logical evaluation.

The rope and rock analogy may be flawed as the rope and rock in question Is biological and hence lubricated and heals and regenerates at least to an extent.
Similarly for the hinge analogy.

Also as life span is finite in this context, is the wear and tear concern espoused by HIT guru's valid or over-blown.

I'm not dismissing the position, and i am a firm supporter of proper form, appropriate exercise selection, bio-mechanics and obviously an exercise dose response that meets ones goals, but has the over training, over reaching, injury prevention HIT position gone to far ?

Hey bud,

Yes wear and tear, injury pervention, overtraining etc are important, but indeed there are HIT guru's / salesman that have taken things too far. As you know, theres even indivduals out there claiming unbelievable gains from preforming one set of partial deads every 3-6 months lol.
Im convinced the writers / salesman that have taken things too far dont actually like training, one stated years ago in an interview with Tony Robbins, "am someone who never actually liked being in a gym, i can think of 15-20 places id rather be". Mike Mentzer, did he even train? I heard it said he didnt train due to having back pain...as someone with a messed up back that does train, i dont buy it!

John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

These same writers / salesman over stress wear and tear / over training etc as a way to get people on board with their minimalistic way of thinking. Admittedly, when i was working 50-60 hours a weeks in a physically taxing jobs, this kind of minimalistic appoarch had its place.
But as soon as i had more time and energy on my hands, i upped my training frequency and volume considerably, and for that, am much stronger, have less back pain and have better health makers.

Best
Rab




Hi Mate,

i'd like to think with JL that he is just going to the extreme to get over a point.
I.E - he may be right in certain circumstances, where one excessively exercises or has underlying issues, but for the majority i feel the juries out.

I think Mr Winchester must be down to 1 set every 9 months now - lol
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Chris H

entsminger wrote:
John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

==Scott==

I think it becomes a problem for these trainers who choose the life of training people to build muscle when they realize they have to keep coming up with new stuff to attract clients and in reality very little out there is new stuff. They need to sell a new book so they conjure up some fancy routine that really doesn't produce any better results than a basic workout. Then what? They drink, ha ha!


im not so sure, JL needs to do that, or if it makes that much of a difference to him financially.
How much would he get from this book, the first in what 10 years, and its unlikely to be a best seller ?
JL's intent may be sincere, if one agrees with his position or not.

Open User Options Menu

sirloin

Chris H wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Chris H wrote:
this is the second installment of the "is John Little"- right series" - lol

All jokes aside, this is a serious question.

Arthur Jones, said of the joints and lifting, that it was akin to pulling a rope over a rock, and hence over time wear and tear would occur.
A reason therefore to support the minimum dose for exercise etc etc

John Little in his new book refers to the joints as hinges and postulates on how many "openings" those joints have in them - I.E - Shelf life.

Are they right, or are they making incorrect assumptions even though based on logical evaluation.

The rope and rock analogy may be flawed as the rope and rock in question Is biological and hence lubricated and heals and regenerates at least to an extent.
Similarly for the hinge analogy.

Also as life span is finite in this context, is the wear and tear concern espoused by HIT guru's valid or over-blown.

I'm not dismissing the position, and i am a firm supporter of proper form, appropriate exercise selection, bio-mechanics and obviously an exercise dose response that meets ones goals, but has the over training, over reaching, injury prevention HIT position gone to far ?

Hey bud,

Yes wear and tear, injury pervention, overtraining etc are important, but indeed there are HIT guru's / salesman that have taken things too far. As you know, theres even indivduals out there claiming unbelievable gains from preforming one set of partial deads every 3-6 months lol.
Im convinced the writers / salesman that have taken things too far dont actually like training, one stated years ago in an interview with Tony Robbins, "am someone who never actually liked being in a gym, i can think of 15-20 places id rather be". Mike Mentzer, did he even train? I heard it said he didnt train due to having back pain...as someone with a messed up back that does train, i dont buy it!

John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

These same writers / salesman over stress wear and tear / over training etc as a way to get people on board with their minimalistic way of thinking. Admittedly, when i was working 50-60 hours a weeks in a physically taxing jobs, this kind of minimalistic appoarch had its place.
But as soon as i had more time and energy on my hands, i upped my training frequency and volume considerably, and for that, am much stronger, have less back pain and have better health makers.

Best
Rab




Hi Mate,

i'd like to think with JL that he is just going to the extreme to get over a point.
I.E - he may be right in certain circumstances, where one excessively exercises or has underlying issues, but for the majority i feel the juries out.

I think Mr Winchester must be down to 1 set every 9 months now - lol


After reading JLs comments after his second coperate warrior interview, and from what hes said in the past. JL clearly feels he wasted a good portion of his youth and missed out following the advice of the day / being mislead (the Arnold 6 days a week, 4hrs a day, lots of supplements etc)....of course it didnt stop him using steriod using bodybuilders and elite athletes to help sell his own "revolutionary" training systems.

Hes essentially went from one extreme to the complete other, not just with volume and frequency, but with his view of not moving through "positions of disadvanged leverage" to spare the joints / connective tissues.
I do like the odd static workout or two now and then, but i feel training through a pratical / effective ROM is for the most part the best way forward, i can think of many scenario's where being stronger in "positions of disadvanged leverage" are of benefit.
One example would be getting out of a bath, youve pretty much to do a deadstart dip, and for this reason many of people (especially the eldery) cant even enjoy having a bath.


Best
Rab


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tensionstrength

Chris H wrote:
entsminger wrote:
John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

==Scott==

I think it becomes a problem for these trainers who choose the life of training people to build muscle when they realize they have to keep coming up with new stuff to attract clients and in reality very little out there is new stuff. They need to sell a new book so they conjure up some fancy routine that really doesn't produce any better results than a basic workout. Then what? They drink, ha ha!

im not so sure, JL needs to do that, or if it makes that much of a difference to him financially.
How much would he get from this book, the first in what 10 years, and its unlikely to be a best seller ?
JL's intent may be sincere, if one agrees with his position or not.



I already mentioned it in another thread here. But I really like his description of putting out a high effort in a short amount time and the potential for quick inroad that he talked about in a recent interview.
Open User Options Menu

epdavis7

tensionstrength wrote:
Chris H wrote:
entsminger wrote:
John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

==Scott==

I think it becomes a problem for these trainers who choose the life of training people to build muscle when they realize they have to keep coming up with new stuff to attract clients and in reality very little out there is new stuff. They need to sell a new book so they conjure up some fancy routine that really doesn't produce any better results than a basic workout. Then what? They drink, ha ha!

im not so sure, JL needs to do that, or if it makes that much of a difference to him financially.
How much would he get from this book, the first in what 10 years, and its unlikely to be a best seller ?
JL's intent may be sincere, if one agrees with his position or not.



I already mentioned it in another thread here. But I really like his description of putting out a high effort in a short amount time and the potential for quick inroad that her talked aboit in a recent interview.


Nobody is getting "rich" off these books. I think JL is sincere in what he believes based on his training of people and his own experiences. I think the drinking thing might have been taken out of context. I think he said he drank six beers due to some event. I rarely drink, but had about 10 beers two years ago at a wedding reception. Hardly binge drinking all things considered.
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sirloin

epdavis7 wrote:
tensionstrength wrote:
Chris H wrote:
entsminger wrote:
John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

==Scott==

I think it becomes a problem for these trainers who choose the life of training people to build muscle when they realize they have to keep coming up with new stuff to attract clients and in reality very little out there is new stuff. They need to sell a new book so they conjure up some fancy routine that really doesn't produce any better results than a basic workout. Then what? They drink, ha ha!

im not so sure, JL needs to do that, or if it makes that much of a difference to him financially.
How much would he get from this book, the first in what 10 years, and its unlikely to be a best seller ?
JL's intent may be sincere, if one agrees with his position or not.



I already mentioned it in another thread here. But I really like his description of putting out a high effort in a short amount time and the potential for quick inroad that her talked aboit in a recent interview.


Nobody is getting "rich" off these books. I think JL is sincere in what he believes based on his training of people and his own experiences. I think the drinking thing might have been taken out of context. I think he said he drank six beers due to some event. I rarely drink, but had about 10 beers two years ago at a wedding reception. Hardly binge drinking all things considered.


Binge drinking is the consumption of excessive alcohol within a short period of time. I dont recall him saying he was at an event, on the Nautilus North facebook page, they routinely cherry pick studies supporting the consumption of alcohol or eating junk food like McDonalds. Dont recall people like Jack Lalanne or Steve Reeves advocating that.

I pointed out in my last post, he clearly feels mislead by the advice of the day and that he'd wasted a good portion part of his youth (Though behind every succussful man or woman is a host of mistakes).

Thing is, he has done a fair bit of misleading himself in order to sell his "revolutionary" training systems...by "borrowing" drug using bodybuilders (now dead) for photo shoots. The max contraction video was a joke, they oiled up an elite athlete and had him flex under good lighting, as if to imply this is what you could look like if you use my training system. That particlar training method btw, was based on reaserch from the 50s, thats findings was later found to be "overstated" and could not be replicated.








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tensionstrength

epdavis7 wrote:
tensionstrength wrote:
Chris H wrote:
entsminger wrote:
John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

==Scott==

I think it becomes a problem for these trainers who choose the life of training people to build muscle when they realize they have to keep coming up with new stuff to attract clients and in reality very little out there is new stuff. They need to sell a new book so they conjure up some fancy routine that really doesn't produce any better results than a basic workout. Then what? They drink, ha ha!

im not so sure, JL needs to do that, or if it makes that much of a difference to him financially.
How much would he get from this book, the first in what 10 years, and its unlikely to be a best seller ?
JL's intent may be sincere, if one agrees with his position or not.



I already mentioned it in another thread here. But I really like his description of putting out a high effort in a short amount time and the potential for quick inroad that her talked aboit in a recent interview.


Nobody is getting "rich" off these books. I think JL is sincere in what he believes based on his training of people and his own experiences. I think the drinking thing might have been taken out of context. I think he said he drank six beers due to some event. I rarely drink, but had about 10 beers two years ago at a wedding reception. Hardly binge drinking all things considered.


Yea I hear ya. I mean do you know other people that train that know who John is or for that matter do they know of HIT like trainers/advocates? Seems like when ever I talk with anyone about training they are into Crossfit like stuff or maybe more traditional types of lifting with a decent amount of volume. I guess I have seen some people in the gym doing slowish types of reps. I seem to know alot of people that are big into hitting the treadmill and some runners. Just kind of rambling here I guess but just curious how commonly known HIT and the like is? The thing that has always drawn me to the likes of John Little, Mike Mentzer, etc. is that it is/was different. Doesn't mean I see it the same way, but, makes me think.
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tensionstrength

sirloin wrote:
epdavis7 wrote:
tensionstrength wrote:
Chris H wrote:
entsminger wrote:
John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

==Scott==

I think it becomes a problem for these trainers who choose the life of training people to build muscle when they realize they have to keep coming up with new stuff to attract clients and in reality very little out there is new stuff. They need to sell a new book so they conjure up some fancy routine that really doesn't produce any better results than a basic workout. Then what? They drink, ha ha!

im not so sure, JL needs to do that, or if it makes that much of a difference to him financially.
How much would he get from this book, the first in what 10 years, and its unlikely to be a best seller ?
JL's intent may be sincere, if one agrees with his position or not.



I already mentioned it in another thread here. But I really like his description of putting out a high effort in a short amount time and the potential for quick inroad that her talked aboit in a recent interview.


Nobody is getting "rich" off these books. I think JL is sincere in what he believes based on his training of people and his own experiences. I think the drinking thing might have been taken out of context. I think he said he drank six beers due to some event. I rarely drink, but had about 10 beers two years ago at a wedding reception. Hardly binge drinking all things considered.

Binge drinking is the consumption of excessive alcohol within a short period of time. I dont recall him saying he was at an event, on the Nautilus North facebook page, they routinely cherry pick studies supporting the consumption of alcohol or eating junk food like McDonalds. Dont recall people like Jack Lalanne or Steve Reeves advocating that.

I pointed out in my last post, he clearly feels mislead by the advice of the day and that he'd wasted a good portion part of his youth (Though behind every succussful man or woman is a host of mistakes).

Thing is, he has done a fair bit of misleading himself in order to sell his "revolutionary" training systems...by "borrowing" drug using bodybuilders (now dead) for photo shoots. The max contraction video was a joke, they oiled up an elite athlete and had him flex under good lighting, as if to imply this is what you could look like if you use my training system. That particlar training method btw, was based on reaserch from the 50s, thats findings was later found to be "overstated" and could not be replicated.










I hear ya on the pictures of the titans. I can remember the pic in the first "Static Contraction Training" book that Little and Pete Sisco both put out. I seem to recall one or both of them talking how they didn't havr a say in the pictures that were put into the various books that showed the big bodybuilders. That it was the publishers idea or something. But I hear ya. I know you
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tensionstrength

sirloin wrote:
epdavis7 wrote:
tensionstrength wrote:
Chris H wrote:
entsminger wrote:
John Little stated in a coperate warrior interview a few years ago, that training had ceased to be a passion of his, he said he spends just 10 minutes per week training to get some health benefits, in the same interview, he admitted to binge drinking.

==Scott==

I think it becomes a problem for these trainers who choose the life of training people to build muscle when they realize they have to keep coming up with new stuff to attract clients and in reality very little out there is new stuff. They need to sell a new book so they conjure up some fancy routine that really doesn't produce any better results than a basic workout. Then what? They drink, ha ha!

im not so sure, JL needs to do that, or if it makes that much of a difference to him financially.
How much would he get from this book, the first in what 10 years, and its unlikely to be a best seller ?
JL's intent may be sincere, if one agrees with his position or not.



I already mentioned it in another thread here. But I really like his description of putting out a high effort in a short amount time and the potential for quick inroad that her talked aboit in a recent interview.


Nobody is getting "rich" off these books. I think JL is sincere in what he believes based on his training of people and his own experiences. I think the drinking thing might have been taken out of context. I think he said he drank six beers due to some event. I rarely drink, but had about 10 beers two years ago at a wedding reception. Hardly binge drinking all things considered.

Binge drinking is the consumption of excessive alcohol within a short period of time. I dont recall him saying he was at an event, on the Nautilus North facebook page, they routinely cherry pick studies supporting the consumption of alcohol or eating junk food like McDonalds. Dont recall people like Jack Lalanne or Steve Reeves advocating that.

I pointed out in my last post, he clearly feels mislead by the advice of the day and that he'd wasted a good portion part of his youth (Though behind every succussful man or woman is a host of mistakes).

Thing is, he has done a fair bit of misleading himself in order to sell his "revolutionary" training systems...by "borrowing" drug using bodybuilders (now dead) for photo shoots. The max contraction video was a joke, they oiled up an elite athlete and had him flex under good lighting, as if to imply this is what you could look like if you use my training system. That particlar training method btw, was based on reaserch from the 50s, thats findings was later found to be "overstated" and could not be replicated.










Sorry about the way I ended my last comment with "I know you". I wanted to send what I had already typed before I was out of wifi range. I was starting to say I know you are very happy with and successful with your training. I really get the strong man lifts and all the other stuff you do. I see the validity for all that type along with some of the more so called isolated stuff.
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Nwlifter

What's odd and contradictory, is putting out information on joint health, then advocating the use of extremely high loads in the strongest range (where strength is only higher due to leverage advantages, but assuming the muscle sees the higher load). This puts a ton (almost literally) of load on the joint and no more load on the muscle, where using less load in the weaker range would load the joint much less, but due to less leverage advantages, still apply the same load to the muscle.
Missing the whole concept that external load and external work is NOT the same as internal (muscle) load and work indicates a big misunderstanding of many things.
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