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spud

REDUCING MY REST PERIODS

I train at home and have done for the last 3 and a half years. I do so in a very minimal gym I?ve put together myself. It?s not fancy in the slightest. I don?t have barbells. I do have dumbbells, pullup bar, gymnastic rungs hanging from the pullup, an adjustable bench and parallel bars. In the past month or so, I?ve been reviewing my training. I?ve trained in a variety of styles over the last 15 years (I?m 36) and I?ve decided to alter my training so that it incorporates more of the rush factor i.e. shorter rest periods between sets.

The top two reasons for doing this are that I would like to improve my metabolic conditioning and that I need to spend less time training. I need to spend less time training because I still want and need to train, and reap all the benefits, but the demands of life mean that I have, in the very recent past, skipped too many workouts because I feel that if I didn?t have time to do everything I wanted to do. Rather than do a reduced workout of some kind, leaving out certain movements or body parts, I didn?t even bother training at all.

In my book that?s pathetic. I?ve had a busy time at work and a fraught personal life in the past few years yada yada yada, but then everyone has that kind of random life stress to varying degrees at different times in their lives. I can?t continue to use it as an excuse. It was obvious to me that I needed to spend less time training and I know that the majority of most people?s workout is not ?under load? but are instead spent resting. That for me was the obvious way to trim the fat. Reduce those rest periods.

Regarding the time spent training, I?ve been training using rest periods of 2.5 to 3 minutes and timing them strictly for consistency. Those particular times were picked because they weren?t stupidly long, but at the same weren?t so short that they would compromise my ability to use heavier weights, perform more reps and generally feel good about myself and how strong I am (ego driven training).

I?m not training using a single set to failure per exercise, I?m doing multiple sets per exercise. My volume isn?t excessive in my opinion. It?s 3 to 5 sets per exercise, with decent form and control, but not attempting to adhere to a specific rep speed. Over the years I?ve learned that it?s more important to feel the muscle working than to aim for a speed. As Dr Ken once said, the moment any of fine details like that get in the way of training hard, they become worthless.

Back to the point, my total volume is about 20 ? 25 sets per workout over 5 or 6 exercises. When combined with all the rest periods the overall workout time goes beyond an hour. Whilst I keep a close eye on the exact time I rest between sets of the same exercise, I?m ashamed to admit that I don?t keep track of the amount of time I take between the last set of one exercise and the first set of the next exercise. It probably ends up being far longer than I imagine. Again, it?s not ridiculous, but I?m fairly sure that it?s drifted into the 5 minute realm on many occasions.

I?ve never kept track of overall workout time. By the time I get to the end, I don?t know if I?ve been going for 60 minutes or 90 minutes. Looking back on this, I feel as if it?s a major oversight.

I had begun to reduce rest periods by 30 seconds or so and I?d tried super setting some stuff together but I wasn?t really taking it seriously.

Well, in the last workout I did, which was Saturday 6 July 2019, I set a timer for 40 minutes. My goal was to try and get everything done inside that 40 minutes. I ended up going over slightly, and training for 43 minutes in total.

On two exercises (dumbbell split squats and dumbbell lateral raises) I employed some techniques from Brian Johnson?s High Density Training book that call for rest periods of 20 ? 40 seconds. With pullups and decline sit-ups, I rested for about 10 seconds between pullups and sit-ups i.e. just the time taken to get off the bar and onto the bench, and then for 60 seconds between sit-ups and the next set of pullups. I did 3 straight sets of pushups immediately after the lateral raises resting exactly 60 seconds.

Another goal I had was to ensure that no rest period in the entire workout was longer than 60 seconds. This was based on Ellington Darden?s words that I recently read elsewhere on this forum:

?Sixty seconds between exercises is a good guideline to use at first. Then start to reduce gradually the seconds every two weeks. Thirty seconds between exercises is your next goal. When you can do the routine with an average of 15 seconds rest between exercises, you'll be in a category that few trainees achieve.?

In the distant past I?ve denounced such brief rest periods because they turn a strength workout into a cardio workout, limit the amount of weight I can use and induce failure due to lack of conditioning rather than local muscular fatigue.

Recently though I?ve been reading things written by Dr Ken and other people who are familiar with this style of training.

These writings basically say that it?s true, you I can?t use as much weight or perform the same number of reps when you rest for 30 seconds as you can when you rest for 300 seconds because you?re not as well recovered. However, the external load used is ultimately a means to an end. Even if you have to greatly reduce the load when using very brief rest periods, it doesn?t prevent you from gradually and progressively increasing that load over time in the medium to long term. What?s more important than the load is the intensity of effort when perform your sets i.e. working to failure, or at least close enough to it to be considered sufficiently intense for gaining strength and muscle. Once your conditioning gets to a certain level (after a good many training sessions) it becomes the norm and not a problem. Most people try this for a handful of workouts at most, when really, they should try it for at least 6 months and see what happens. Another advantage of this type of training is that you can deliver a great training stimulus without using heavy weights, thus reducing risk of injury somewhat. If you are interested in competitive listing or seeing how much you can lift, then there is no way around it, you will have to rest for a long time between sets.

My experiences in my 43 minute workout? Although it?s not incredibly fast, it felt like it. That?s because I did the same number of sets as I would have done in a 60+ minute workout. It seemed like I never stopped. At most all I could do between sets was check the timer, write down the relevant numbers, maybe take a large gulp of water and prepare for the next set. There was very little time for staring into space or letting my mind wonder. Perhaps that is another bonus of brief rest periods. It keeps you focused, in the zone, mentally switched on and present. It greatly reduced my ability to think about anything other than what I was doing let alone *do* anything in between sets other than breathe and prepare.

Squats were the last thing I did in this workout because I was apprehensive about being wiped out and unable to do just to anything else. I still poured plenty of effort in because my lower body wasn?t used for anything earlier in the workout. Next time, as a trial, I?m planning to start with the squats and see what the overall effect is.

Single joint exercises contribute very little to metabolic conditioning. Upper body compound movements do tax you quite heavily in terms of metabolic conditioning, definitely more so than single joint movements. Lower body compound movements reign supreme though. Nothing can compare to a squat, leg press, deadlift or perhaps movements like back extensions and glute ham raises that still involve a lot of muscle in the glutes and thighs.

Today, two days on my body feels as worked and in need of recovery as it ever has. The pump in my shoulders, thighs and glutes is still there.

From this point on, I?m on something of a personal a mission to become seriously well-conditioned, and not to miss workouts. I?d like to reduce the overall length of my workouts to a maximum of 35 minutes on a consistent basis. That?s only 8 minutes less than my last workout which doesn?t seem like a lot but it?s a reduction of 18%. When it?s expressed in those terms, it sounds huge. It will be a gradual process. I?m not going to aim to make extreme changes within a handful of workouts.

I think training at home is a huge advantage in this style of training. I am in complete control of my training environment and there is nobody watching me train so it?s easier to keep my ego in check and remind myself that how I look when I?m training in terms of the amount of external load I?m using is irrelevant.

I?ll use this thread as something of a training log, although I won?t be posting much personal information, or information related to my training. It?ll be mostly thoughts and observations.

I won?t be posting videos, physique shots or impressive lifts. I?ll leave that to Turpin. Later on I?ll post some of the things I?ve read that have helped to inspire this change in my training.
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spud

Here is Dr Ken with some words that I found inspiring. I'm going to try and put them into practice.

======

Asking Dr. Ken - Issue #33
by Dr. Ken E. Leistner

Speed of training
The next question irritated me for some reason. How's that for honesty? I am not implying that the questioner asked this because he wants to train "easier" but this is the type of thing I get from those who do, so I find it frustrating.

Once you are warmed up, you train as heavy and as hard as possible for your specific number of reps in each set. This is a given. Warmups that detract from your top or work set(s) for the day serve no positive purpose. I don't believe in taking a lot of rest between sets once the workout is in gear. This is a hell of a lot different from doing a set, even if doing it intensely, and then sitting on your ass waiting to completely recover before going on to the next set. The stimulus and change that training brings is biochemical in nature. You have to force this change in your body as should be obvious to all of those trainees who do not get results from their training. Intensity, from your body's perspective, occurs when it is forced to really work hard. This also means stressing the anaerobic system in my opinion.

If you are in the mood to "demonstrate" how much weight you can use in an exercise, or if you're training for a lifting contest where the purpose is to lift as much as possible, fine, rest as long as you need to in order to use as much weight as possible. If sheer weight were the only thing that the body responded to, then the competitive lifters using the heaviest weights for the lowest reps would have the best developed bodies, and this just isn't true.

There is nothing contradictory about stating that, once the workout is going, you are to move fairly quickly between sets and use as much weight as is possible for the given reps. Yes, you will do "better," i.e., use more weight, if you wait to completely catch your breath, get a drink of water, sit and chat a while, psyche up and bang your head into a wall, but it also severely reduces the overall intensity of the workout as we define intensity, and as I believe the body must be stimulated. Thus, it is not contradictory to state that you should minimize warmups and also minimize rest between sets. There is nothing intense about a two-hour workout that should have lasted forty minutes.
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spud

Rest Between Sets
by Dr. Ken E. Leistner

I recently took part in the best strength-training seminar I've ever been associated with. In addition to the featured speakers, which included the strength coaches of two professional and three major college football teams, there were two very successful high school coaches, and a very, very bright Ph.D., as well as myself. In addition, the audience contained strength and conditioning coaches from other major college and high school programs, who were able to give the speakers the kind of information that made the entire affair a true interchange of ideas.

Although all of the speakers held similar philosophies of strength training, each of us did things a little bit differently. The material was far from identical, and the differences were instructive and valuable to everyone present. One of the most noticeable differences was the amount of rest taken between sets of exercises, and this is a topic that's of interest to everyone.

When an athlete wants to demonstrate strength, it's imperative to create conditions that will best allow that demonstration. The athlete should take every "shortcut" possible, reducing the distance the weight is moved, improving leverages in the involved bodyparts, altering body position and utilizing equipment that makes the lift as "easy" as possible, wearing apparel that provides maximum support to the involved parts, and of course, being as well rested and mentally prepared as possible. In order to build strength, the athlete should make each and every repetition as difficult to do as is possible. No supportive gear or favorable body position should be pursued, nor should the lifter attempt to maximize the possibilities of making each rep. In other words, the harder each rep of each set is, assuming that the movement works the bodypart it purports to, the "better," the harder, and the more productive the workout will be.

It's obvious that the more time taken between sets, the more rested and mentally prepared or "psyched" the lifter can be. Again, this is great if one's primary desire is to demonstrate the strength that's already present and which has resulted from previous workouts. If the goal is to continue to build strength, each all-out set which has preceded the one being done, will have taken something away from the trainee's energy and strength levels. In a very tough workout, the psychological edge will also be worn thin, with the athlete fighting to concentrate on each rep of each set. This is in stark comparison to the lifter who stalks the gym between sets, tightening his wraps, pulling up the straps on the supportive suit, sniffing ammonia or amyl nitrate, getting slapped by his training partner after eight minutes of rest following the preceding set.

Obviously, it's almost impossible to maintain a high level of intensity if one takes the time to fully recover between sets. At one extreme, and this is what we do with the majority of our trainees, no rest is taken between sets, other than that necessary to go from one exercise to the next, and properly and safely position oneself for that particular movement. For the uninitiated, this is a very difficult way to train, and it's true that cardiorespiratory deficiency will reduce the ability to exert maximal muscular effort, at least at first. However, in a very short period of time, the body adapts to the stimulus. Reducing the time of identical workouts increases the intensity of the workout.

Although there have been a number of articles published which indicated that circuit training, or Nautilus training without rest between sets, did little for cardiovascular fitness, aerobic capacity was defined and tested for in a way that did not give a complete account of the matter, and training all-out and heavily on each set, with minimal rest between sets, will give good benefits for local muscular and metabolic endurance.

I also believe that once the adaptation is made, in the long term, the increased intensity caused by minimal inter-set rest will lead to greater gains in strength. Quoting the University of Michigan's Mike Gittleson, "You can handle greater weights if you train slowly, because you're getting more rest between sets. But, if you're gaining strength working quickly, it becomes all relative. If the fast worker takes more rest between sets, he too will handle heavier relative loads. By the same token, if the slow worker works quickly, he must train with less weight, often even with less relative weight than the fast worker."

Some strength coaches, who also believe that one high-intensity set, taken to the point of momentary muscular failure/fatigue, is the best way to train for increased gains in muscular strength and size, prefer more rest between sets than I advocate. They often give their athletes up to one minute between sets in order to allow further respiratory recovery so that breathing limitations or difficulties don't hamper their next attempted set. By anyone's standards, one minute between heavy, all-out sets, taken to absolute failure, is not excessive rest, but it will make a significant difference in the amount of weight that can be used, especially in those sets done immediately after a major movement such as squats or Leverage Leg Press, or those done toward the end of a workout.

What we sometimes do is provide a "built in" respite in the body of the training session. As I stated previously, we rest only as long as it takes to move from one exercise to the next, and in those programs that call for two consecutive sets of the same exercise, a maximum of one minute between those sets. I have always felt that whatever was lost in terms of the ability to handle a bit more weight in subsequent sets, was offset by the increased intensity in those sets due to the effects of the lack of rest.

In a training session where we will do, for example, a set of Leverage Leg Press, stiff-legged deadlift, pullover, Leverage Double Press, and Leverage Pulldown, the metabolic demands are very high if one is truly training properly and taking "no rest" between those sets. In order to maximize performance on subsequent sets, we will often do an all-out set to failure/fatigue of an exercise that's not as metabolically demanding as the other movements, such as neck flexion and extension, or heel raises for the calves. I would much prefer to have our athletes do another exercise, even if it provides some "relief" from the onslaught of the "major movements," as opposed to resting. Like Mike Gittleson, I believe that "you must always be consistent with your rest period from workout to workout." This also maintains a reliable and reproducible interpretation of each workout.

As impossible as it seems to adapt to the increased demands of linking heavy squats and deadlifts together with almost no rest between them, especially for the lifter or athlete who is in poor metabolic condition, which, of course, includes the overwhelming majority of competitive powerlifters, it can be done. In fact, it can be done so that results are greater than one could have expected.

Remember that the purpose of a competitive meet or formal testing session, if the coach demands, is to demonstrate strength, but the day-to-day, week-to-week workouts should be designed to build strength in the most effective manner possible. I know that in my own case, I'm uncomfortable muscularly and respiratorily after my first, or at worst second set in any workout, especially when those first two sets are squats or Leverage Leg Presses, and a demanding lower-back movement. I also know that this forces me to better focus on all of the sets to follow, and markedly increases the intensity of the work I do. Over any ten- or twelve-week period, this adds up to increased gains.

Once you've trained properly, at a very high level of intensity, you'll almost welcome the discomfort and the inability to fully "catch your breath." There is a certain feeling one has when a proper training session has been completed, and taking excessive rest between sets will steal that from you and reduce the gains that could have come from your workouts.
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Chris H

spud wrote:
REDUCING MY REST PERIODS

I train at home and have done for the last 3 and a half years. I do so in a very minimal gym I?ve put together myself. It?s not fancy in the slightest. I don?t have barbells. I do have dumbbells, pullup bar, gymnastic rungs hanging from the pullup, an adjustable bench and parallel bars. In the past month or so, I?ve been reviewing my training. I?ve trained in a variety of styles over the last 15 years (I?m 36) and I?ve decided to alter my training so that it incorporates more of the rush factor i.e. shorter rest periods between sets.

The top two reasons for doing this are that I would like to improve my metabolic conditioning and that I need to spend less time training. I need to spend less time training because I still want and need to train, and reap all the benefits, but the demands of life mean that I have, in the very recent past, skipped too many workouts because I feel that if I didn?t have time to do everything I wanted to do. Rather than do a reduced workout of some kind, leaving out certain movements or body parts, I didn?t even bother training at all.

In my book that?s pathetic. I?ve had a busy time at work and a fraught personal life in the past few years yada yada yada, but then everyone has that kind of random life stress to varying degrees at different times in their lives. I can?t continue to use it as an excuse. It was obvious to me that I needed to spend less time training and I know that the majority of most people?s workout is not ?under load? but are instead spent resting. That for me was the obvious way to trim the fat. Reduce those rest periods.

Regarding the time spent training, I?ve been training using rest periods of 2.5 to 3 minutes and timing them strictly for consistency. Those particular times were picked because they weren?t stupidly long, but at the same weren?t so short that they would compromise my ability to use heavier weights, perform more reps and generally feel good about myself and how strong I am (ego driven training).

I?m not training using a single set to failure per exercise, I?m doing multiple sets per exercise. My volume isn?t excessive in my opinion. It?s 3 to 5 sets per exercise, with decent form and control, but not attempting to adhere to a specific rep speed. Over the years I?ve learned that it?s more important to feel the muscle working than to aim for a speed. As Dr Ken once said, the moment any of fine details like that get in the way of training hard, they become worthless.

Back to the point, my total volume is about 20 ? 25 sets per workout over 5 or 6 exercises. When combined with all the rest periods the overall workout time goes beyond an hour. Whilst I keep a close eye on the exact time I rest between sets of the same exercise, I?m ashamed to admit that I don?t keep track of the amount of time I take between the last set of one exercise and the first set of the next exercise. It probably ends up being far longer than I imagine. Again, it?s not ridiculous, but I?m fairly sure that it?s drifted into the 5 minute realm on many occasions.

I?ve never kept track of overall workout time. By the time I get to the end, I don?t know if I?ve been going for 60 minutes or 90 minutes. Looking back on this, I feel as if it?s a major oversight.

I had begun to reduce rest periods by 30 seconds or so and I?d tried super setting some stuff together but I wasn?t really taking it seriously.

Well, in the last workout I did, which was Saturday 6 July 2019, I set a timer for 40 minutes. My goal was to try and get everything done inside that 40 minutes. I ended up going over slightly, and training for 43 minutes in total.

On two exercises (dumbbell split squats and dumbbell lateral raises) I employed some techniques from Brian Johnson?s High Density Training book that call for rest periods of 20 ? 40 seconds. With pullups and decline sit-ups, I rested for about 10 seconds between pullups and sit-ups i.e. just the time taken to get off the bar and onto the bench, and then for 60 seconds between sit-ups and the next set of pullups. I did 3 straight sets of pushups immediately after the lateral raises resting exactly 60 seconds.

Another goal I had was to ensure that no rest period in the entire workout was longer than 60 seconds. This was based on Ellington Darden?s words that I recently read elsewhere on this forum:

?Sixty seconds between exercises is a good guideline to use at first. Then start to reduce gradually the seconds every two weeks. Thirty seconds between exercises is your next goal. When you can do the routine with an average of 15 seconds rest between exercises, you'll be in a category that few trainees achieve.?

In the distant past I?ve denounced such brief rest periods because they turn a strength workout into a cardio workout, limit the amount of weight I can use and induce failure due to lack of conditioning rather than local muscular fatigue.

Recently though I?ve been reading things written by Dr Ken and other people who are familiar with this style of training.

These writings basically say that it?s true, you I can?t use as much weight or perform the same number of reps when you rest for 30 seconds as you can when you rest for 300 seconds because you?re not as well recovered. However, the external load used is ultimately a means to an end. Even if you have to greatly reduce the load when using very brief rest periods, it doesn?t prevent you from gradually and progressively increasing that load over time in the medium to long term. What?s more important than the load is the intensity of effort when perform your sets i.e. working to failure, or at least close enough to it to be considered sufficiently intense for gaining strength and muscle. Once your conditioning gets to a certain level (after a good many training sessions) it becomes the norm and not a problem. Most people try this for a handful of workouts at most, when really, they should try it for at least 6 months and see what happens. Another advantage of this type of training is that you can deliver a great training stimulus without using heavy weights, thus reducing risk of injury somewhat. If you are interested in competitive listing or seeing how much you can lift, then there is no way around it, you will have to rest for a long time between sets.

My experiences in my 43 minute workout? Although it?s not incredibly fast, it felt like it. That?s because I did the same number of sets as I would have done in a 60+ minute workout. It seemed like I never stopped. At most all I could do between sets was check the timer, write down the relevant numbers, maybe take a large gulp of water and prepare for the next set. There was very little time for staring into space or letting my mind wonder. Perhaps that is another bonus of brief rest periods. It keeps you focused, in the zone, mentally switched on and present. It greatly reduced my ability to think about anything other than what I was doing let alone *do* anything in between sets other than breathe and prepare.

Squats were the last thing I did in this workout because I was apprehensive about being wiped out and unable to do just to anything else. I still poured plenty of effort in because my lower body wasn?t used for anything earlier in the workout. Next time, as a trial, I?m planning to start with the squats and see what the overall effect is.

Single joint exercises contribute very little to metabolic conditioning. Upper body compound movements do tax you quite heavily in terms of metabolic conditioning, definitely more so than single joint movements. Lower body compound movements reign supreme though. Nothing can compare to a squat, leg press, deadlift or perhaps movements like back extensions and glute ham raises that still involve a lot of muscle in the glutes and thighs.

Today, two days on my body feels as worked and in need of recovery as it ever has. The pump in my shoulders, thighs and glutes is still there.

From this point on, I?m on something of a personal a mission to become seriously well-conditioned, and not to miss workouts. I?d like to reduce the overall length of my workouts to a maximum of 35 minutes on a consistent basis. That?s only 8 minutes less than my last workout which doesn?t seem like a lot but it?s a reduction of 18%. When it?s expressed in those terms, it sounds huge. It will be a gradual process. I?m not going to aim to make extreme changes within a handful of workouts.

I think training at home is a huge advantage in this style of training. I am in complete control of my training environment and there is nobody watching me train so it?s easier to keep my ego in check and remind myself that how I look when I?m training in terms of the amount of external load I?m using is irrelevant.

I?ll use this thread as something of a training log, although I won?t be posting much personal information, or information related to my training. It?ll be mostly thoughts and observations.

I won?t be posting videos, physique shots or impressive lifts. I?ll leave that to Turpin. Later on I?ll post some of the things I?ve read that have helped to inspire this change in my training.


interesting stuff Spud.
Somewhat mirrors my current approach.
Difference is i work TBDL and Decline bench for strength, so i ramp up slowly {3 min rest between sets}to a couple of sets of 3-5 reps or a heavy static hold, but everything else is 3 - 5 sets of 10 -15 rhythmic reps, with 30 - 60 sec rest between sets.
Good luck with your experiment.
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sirloin

I like it, will follow.

Beest
Rob
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Crotalus

All good stuff from Dr Ken.

Even when I abandoned the full body routines I stuck with short rest times between sets , usually 15-30 seconds ... one minute or so for something like TBDL's.

I always liked Gironda's idea of not even taking your hands off the piece of equipment your working on between sets.

Fastest way to increase the intensity of a workout is cut down the rest periods.

Today though, in most places, rest periods are whatever is needed to answer e-mails, reply to texts or check Facebook.
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Equity

Crotalus wrote:
All good stuff from Dr Ken.

Even when I abandoned the full body routines I stuck with short rest times between sets , usually 15-30 seconds ... one minute or so for something like TBDL's.

I always liked Gironda's idea of not even taking your hands off the piece of equipment your working on between sets.

Fastest way to increase the intensity of a workout is cut down the rest periods.

Today though, in most places, rest periods are whatever is needed to answer e-mails, reply to texts or check Facebook.


Many moons ago I thought about adapting 20 Rep Squat technique into upper body movements.

I know Kim Wood advocates high reps for both upper and lower body (20 or more per sent for upper). Then I came across cluster sets because of Brian Johnston. Then it hit me that sets are just a cluster of reps with a set time limit between. Meaning volume is inseparable from reps (i.e. sets and reps are both the same thing... volume. Conducted in a certain time frame).

I remember John Little quoting Roux Lange saying work is the amount of work conducted in a unit of time (long time ago correct me if I'm wrong). He did this in Power Factor Training. The strongest range partials thing was wrong but the principle was right.

Most people's surnames are not Viator or Mentzer and require more volume than such individuals. This is not to say don't go to failure. I've never said as such. I believe it's a requirement to hit the high threshold fibers.

Regards.

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Crotalus

Equity wrote:
Then I came across cluster sets because of Brian Johnston. Then it hit me that sets are just a cluster of reps with a set time limit between. Meaning volume is inseparable from reps (i.e. sets and reps are both the same thing... volume. Conducted in a certain time frame).


Yeah, I think Brian said something like 'more contractions in the same amount of time'. Brian was the one responsible for me breaking out of my constricted mind set in training,
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epdavis7

Go for it! You are your own experiment. Define your intent and expectations of what you want from your training and go for it.

My training does not mirror others on here, but I have no interest in bodybuilding or powerlifting.
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spud

Workout Sunday 14 July 2019

Total workout time was 23:06.

Total sets performed was 14.

My other routine has 20 sets in it so does take a little longer.

Row with Brian Johnston's Pump + 8 method total of 5 sets.
Back extension with 30-15-8 (3 sets)
Decline situps (straight sets resting for 60 seconds)
Seated dumbbell press with 30-15-8 (3 sets).

The lack of big leg movements (squat deadlift, leg press) meant there was less of a metabolic conditioning effect. I'm thinking I might add on some dumbbell Romanian deadlifts in future to give me some of that.

I still felt it, but it wasn't as intense as when I do split squats in my other routine.

We were about to go out for the afternoon/evening. We had an hour to get ready. My wife was convinced I wouldn't have time to train. Instead I got it done and got ready wit time to spare. In the past it would have been another day where I simply didn't have time and it would have slipped form my scheduled completely.

I'm going to reduce the weight slightly on the press next time so that I can focus on better muscular contraction. I felt like I was beginning to do something to the weights with my muscles rather than doing something to my muscles with the weights. It's rather nuanced, and I don't get bogged down in detail, but I was moving more into lifting than quality muscular loading.

With a limited amount of weight available to me, I can see that using a combination of volume and density, with reps no lower than about 8 is definitely the best way make progress and get something from my training.
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Crotalus

spud wrote:
Workout Sunday 14 July 2019

Total workout time was 23:06.

Total sets performed was 14.



Real close to where I am with sets and time completing them. My workouts vary from 14 - 18 total sets and 23- 30 minutes to complete. I train three days a week and have recently added kettle bell swings on my off days.
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