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epdavis7

frostyF wrote:
epdavis7 wrote:
He seems like a guy I would like to hang out with, shoot the shit, and drink a few beers with. Pretty straight forward down to earth guy with a little eccentricity. Kind of like me.

True! He gives no f*#ks! He told a story about when he and Greg Anderson went to the airport to pick up Mike Mentzer for a seminar.Mike demanded that Doug carry his (Mike's) bag.Doug said,"Uh,no.You look like a pretty strong guy.Carry your own bag! Show us the functional benefits of Heavy Duty,Mike!"
Brutal! I'm still laughing!


Classic lol. Don?t get me wrong, I?m a Mentzer fan, but at times he came across as a pompous know it all.
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Chris H

sirloin wrote:
frostyF wrote:
spud and Chris H,
True words from both of you.When I visited Doug a few days ago he was dressed in a baggy,long sleeve sweatshirt and long shorts,but I could tell he was carrying good tissue underneath,especially in the trap,shoulders,upper back,and what little I could see of his thighs.I asked what he weighed and in typical Doug-speak he replied,"One hundred fifty-three pounds of red meat!"
Not bad for a 60 year old who works out twice a week for three minutes to nine minutes per workout.

Ill bet hes muscles are dense as fcuk! Decades of heavy deads, weighted chins, squats etc...its beautiful.


without a doubt, his workouts are testimony to that.
i'm fascinated by what we can do, particularly as we age, and lifting is about as close to the fountain of youth as we can get, and the likes of Doug are inspirational, but hes gonna break, and then what.
Might be wrong, might be looking at vids of Doug in 20 years still pulling 400 plus and drinking Heineken, proving me wrong.
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spud

Chris H wrote:
i agree, but to quantify what i meant, is the likes of Ken, Doug, Stewart McRobert, Bob Whelan etc etc, say get strong at few basic exercises and you gonna develop your to its max as well, whilst clearly is not true.
Taking your line-up analogy, Doug compared to most who look far better, but not far better than many in his age group who lift. I'm 56 next month, and i think i look better, and whist Brian J and Turpin are a few years younger at 54, 53 they look a lot better.
Not criticizing Doug, hes an athlete and would wipe the floor with me in a gym and i'm considerably larger than him, its just hes locked into one way of doing things, which obviously suits his goals, but its not optimal for physiques development.


I've never seen a photo of Stuart McRobert so I have no idea what kind of physique he has. I've seen photos of Bob Whelan and he was "big and strong", but also clearly very fat. Fat enough that I can safely say it wasn't healthy.

Dr Ken, clearly was like Doug. Small and wiry, very strong but his training was always focused on strength. Given his powerlifting background, the emphasis wasn't on muscular stimulation, but on completing the allotted reps and striving for that poundage increase as often as he could. I agree with you that this kind of training whilst it's good in some respects is not going to develop large muscles.

Given what I've heard from Doug, seen on video and read, I don't think he cares about optimal hypertrophy. I don't think he's ever been wired that way. He just likes to train hard using machines, bodyweight and free weights, keep the workouts brief and only train twice a week at most. He take whatever that gives him and then enjoy life. Besides, optimising hypertrophy is only one benefit/outcome of strength training. There are so many benefits that aren't outwardly visible that are so much more beneficial for health. Doug is definitely reaping all of them.

Chris H wrote:
but hes gonna break, and then what.
Might be wrong


You make it sound like Doug is doing CrossFit and it's only a matter of time before he shts a kidney or snaps his spine.

My money is on you being wrong. From what I can work out, Doug thinks nothing of taking a 2 month layoff from deadlifting if he feels like he's getting negatively affected by the movement in even the slightest way. That's a million miles away from a gung-ho attitude trying to lift all that he possibly can to impress people and massage his own ego.

He mentioned on a podcast that back when he was training for a powerlifting meet, he'd never go heavier than triples. This is a guy that had set state records in the past. That's an eminently sensible approach ot training compared with the attitude of many powerlifters out there.

His form on everything is easily good enough that the chance of him getting injured is negligible.

If he ever needs to stop squatting and deadlifting with barbells or trapbars for some reason, then he's got a low back machine and a Frank Zane leg blaster, MedX leg press, MedX Avenger leg press, Hammer leg press and Hammer H-Squat.

Working in his gym, he also averages about 20,000 steps per day and moves, on average, a total of 7500 pounds of weights a day.

He'll be fine.
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spud

frostyF wrote:
He told a story about when he and Greg Anderson went to the airport to pick up Mike Mentzer for a seminar.Mike demanded that Doug carry his (Mike's) bag.Doug said,"Uh,no.You look like a pretty strong guy.Carry your own bag! Show us the functional benefits of Heavy Duty,Mike!"


They say to never meet your heroes.

Mentzer isn't one of my heroes. I wouldn't even call myself a fan.

This story makes him come across like a total prck. What a pretentious a-hole.

I think if Doug managed to hold back and make light of the scenario as described above, then he did very well.
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frostyF

Arkansas, USA

spud,
Doug did report that Mentzer recognized Doug's humor and went ahead and carried his own bag.They were friends after that initial incident.
Leon
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frostyF

Arkansas, USA

spud,
I'd heard about Doug's long lay-offs between deadlift workouts and I asked him about it.He answered,"Can't explain it,really.I just know when it's time to put it aside.And then I come back,review the last workout,plug back in,and everything works!"
He explained that in the interim his thighs,upper back,trapezius muscles encountered enough work from other exercises to give his low back a good rest.Talk about restraint! He told me he's trying to write a book about all this.
I'm going back to visit him in October.
Leon
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hit4me

Florida, USA

frostyF wrote:
spud,
I'd heard about Doug's long lay-offs between deadlift workouts and I asked him about it.He answered,"Can't explain it,really.I just know when it's time to put it aside.And then I come back,review the last workout,plug back in,and everything works!"
He explained that in the interim his thighs,upper back,trapezius muscles encountered enough work from other exercises to give his low back a good rest.Talk about restraint! He told me he's trying to write a book about all this.
I'm going back to visit him in October.
Leon


didn't Jones say that your lower back needs two weeks to recover fully?
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ron33

spud wrote:
frostyF wrote:
He told a story about when he and Greg Anderson went to the airport to pick up Mike Mentzer for a seminar.Mike demanded that Doug carry his (Mike's) bag.Doug said,"Uh,no.You look like a pretty strong guy.Carry your own bag! Show us the functional benefits of Heavy Duty,Mike!"

They say to never meet your heroes.

Mentzer isn't one of my heroes. I wouldn't even call myself a fan.

This story makes him come across like a total prck. What a pretentious a-hole.

I think if Doug managed to hold back and make light of the scenario as described above, then he did very well.

Of course I don't know conversation between mr.s Holland and Mentzer , but when I was in contact with Mentzer , he was always very helpful and interesting and seemed like a person who cared about others . He also knew that he wasn't going to make any $s from me and was still helping at his expense . He seems to get a bad rap most of the time .
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sirloin

hit4me wrote:
frostyF wrote:
spud,
I'd heard about Doug's long lay-offs between deadlift workouts and I asked him about it.He answered,"Can't explain it,really.I just know when it's time to put it aside.And then I come back,review the last workout,plug back in,and everything works!"
He explained that in the interim his thighs,upper back,trapezius muscles encountered enough work from other exercises to give his low back a good rest.Talk about restraint! He told me he's trying to write a book about all this.
I'm going back to visit him in October.
Leon

didn't Jones say that your lower back needs two weeks to recover fully?


Id say it depends on the person and how strong / advanced they are.
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Chris H

spud wrote:
Chris H wrote:
i agree, but to quantify what i meant, is the likes of Ken, Doug, Stewart McRobert, Bob Whelan etc etc, say get strong at few basic exercises and you gonna develop your to its max as well, whilst clearly is not true.
Taking your line-up analogy, Doug compared to most who look far better, but not far better than many in his age group who lift. I'm 56 next month, and i think i look better, and whist Brian J and Turpin are a few years younger at 54, 53 they look a lot better.
Not criticizing Doug, hes an athlete and would wipe the floor with me in a gym and i'm considerably larger than him, its just hes locked into one way of doing things, which obviously suits his goals, but its not optimal for physiques development.

I've never seen a photo of Stuart McRobert so I have no idea what kind of physique he has. I've seen photos of Bob Whelan and he was "big and strong", but also clearly very fat. Fat enough that I can safely say it wasn't healthy.

Dr Ken, clearly was like Doug. Small and wiry, very strong but his training was always focused on strength. Given his powerlifting background, the emphasis wasn't on muscular stimulation, but on completing the allotted reps and striving for that poundage increase as often as he could. I agree with you that this kind of training whilst it's good in some respects is not going to develop large muscles.

Given what I've heard from Doug, seen on video and read, I don't think he cares about optimal hypertrophy. I don't think he's ever been wired that way. He just likes to train hard using machines, bodyweight and free weights, keep the workouts brief and only train twice a week at most. He take whatever that gives him and then enjoy life. Besides, optimising hypertrophy is only one benefit/outcome of strength training. There are so many benefits that aren't outwardly visible that are so much more beneficial for health. Doug is definitely reaping all of them.

Chris H wrote:
but hes gonna break, and then what.
Might be wrong

You make it sound like Doug is doing CrossFit and it's only a matter of time before he shts a kidney or snaps his spine.

My money is on you being wrong. From what I can work out, Doug thinks nothing of taking a 2 month layoff from deadlifting if he feels like he's getting negatively affected by the movement in even the slightest way. That's a million miles away from a gung-ho attitude trying to lift all that he possibly can to impress people and massage his own ego.

He mentioned on a podcast that back when he was training for a powerlifting meet, he'd never go heavier than triples. This is a guy that had set state records in the past. That's an eminently sensible approach ot training compared with the attitude of many powerlifters out there.

His form on everything is easily good enough that the chance of him getting injured is negligible.

If he ever needs to stop squatting and deadlifting with barbells or trapbars for some reason, then he's got a low back machine and a Frank Zane leg blaster, MedX leg press, MedX Avenger leg press, Hammer leg press and Hammer H-Squat.

Working in his gym, he also averages about 20,000 steps per day and moves, on average, a total of 7500 pounds of weights a day.

He'll be fine.




thanks for the perspective and info on Doug.
i was already aware from his comments on BBS a few years back, that he only pulled 1x a month. This coupled with what you relay here does put his approach in a different light.
Maybe he will be fine, well into old age, and as its likely i will be nicking some of his ideas, so i have a vested interest here - LOL

I was making no correlation to Cross-fit,just simply implying everybody who lifts heavy breaks sooner or later, however later may never occur depending on application.
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sirloin

Chris H wrote:
sirloin wrote:
frostyF wrote:
spud and Chris H,
True words from both of you.When I visited Doug a few days ago he was dressed in a baggy,long sleeve sweatshirt and long shorts,but I could tell he was carrying good tissue underneath,especially in the trap,shoulders,upper back,and what little I could see of his thighs.I asked what he weighed and in typical Doug-speak he replied,"One hundred fifty-three pounds of red meat!"
Not bad for a 60 year old who works out twice a week for three minutes to nine minutes per workout.

Ill bet hes muscles are dense as fcuk! Decades of heavy deads, weighted chins, squats etc...its beautiful.

without a doubt, his workouts are testimony to that.
i'm fascinated by what we can do, particularly as we age, and lifting is about as close to the fountain of youth as we can get, and the likes of Doug are inspirational, but hes gonna break, and then what.
Might be wrong, might be looking at vids of Doug in 20 years still pulling 400 plus and drinking Heineken, proving me wrong.


Mate, ive had well meaning (but naysayers) tell me i shouldnt do this or that due to me having a stroke in my 20s and my back. Well, its been 16 years since my stroke, and no issues, we cant live in fear or by "what ifs". Dont get me wrong, i dont have a death wish, i know when to back off, as am sure Doug Holland does. If he does "break", am sure he'll expect and deal with it.

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Chris H

sirloin wrote:
Chris H wrote:
sirloin wrote:
frostyF wrote:
spud and Chris H,
True words from both of you.When I visited Doug a few days ago he was dressed in a baggy,long sleeve sweatshirt and long shorts,but I could tell he was carrying good tissue underneath,especially in the trap,shoulders,upper back,and what little I could see of his thighs.I asked what he weighed and in typical Doug-speak he replied,"One hundred fifty-three pounds of red meat!"
Not bad for a 60 year old who works out twice a week for three minutes to nine minutes per workout.

Ill bet hes muscles are dense as fcuk! Decades of heavy deads, weighted chins, squats etc...its beautiful.

without a doubt, his workouts are testimony to that.
i'm fascinated by what we can do, particularly as we age, and lifting is about as close to the fountain of youth as we can get, and the likes of Doug are inspirational, but hes gonna break, and then what.
Might be wrong, might be looking at vids of Doug in 20 years still pulling 400 plus and drinking Heineken, proving me wrong.

Mate, ive had well meaning (but naysayers) tell me i shouldnt do this or that due to me having a stroke in my 20s and my back. Well, its been 16 years since my stroke, and no issues, we cant live in fear or by "what ifs". Dont get me wrong, i dont have a death wish, i know when to back off, as am sure Doug Holland does. If he does "break", am sure he'll expect and deal with it.



oh trust me im not a naysayer one bit.
i'm a firm believer that a high level of strength can be maintained well into old age, as long as one respects ones self on the journey.
Brief intense but infrequent as per Mr Hollands approach as relayed by Spud seems sound, as its not constant bang, bang, bang heavy
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1958

Texas, USA

Fuck!I'm in!I looked at Doug's IG,found a post/picture of his sign with the phone #. I called it and left a message.He texted back immediately as he was about to see a client,and then called back several minutes later.He's a jovial guy.Seems excited about what he does.He's trying to create a space for me in the next few weekends.It'll be an easy trip since I'm only 160 miles away.
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HeavyHitter32

hit4me wrote:
frostyF wrote:
spud,
I'd heard about Doug's long lay-offs between deadlift workouts and I asked him about it.He answered,"Can't explain it,really.I just know when it's time to put it aside.And then I come back,review the last workout,plug back in,and everything works!"
He explained that in the interim his thighs,upper back,trapezius muscles encountered enough work from other exercises to give his low back a good rest.Talk about restraint! He told me he's trying to write a book about all this.
I'm going back to visit him in October.
Leon

didn't Jones say that your lower back needs two weeks to recover fully?


It was in context to the MedX lower back machine which is said to really isolate and inroad those muscles compared to anything else out there.
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spud

This is Doug Holland's YouTube Channel. The most recent upload was 23 May 2018, but it's all good stuff.

Interesting to note that all the deadlifting and squatting is for nowhere near a 1 RM at any point. It's always for reps, and they're all from a dead stop.

https://www.youtube.com/...chhelmet/videos
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sirloin

spud wrote:
This is Doug Holland's YouTube Channel. The most recent upload was 23 May 2018, but it's all good stuff.

Interesting to note that all the deadlifting and squatting is for nowhere near a 1 RM at any point. It's always for reps, and they're all from a dead stop.

https://www.youtube.com/.../videos


Am not surprised I guy who's 5'3 deads for reps. Nor that someone like Brian Shaw prefers doubles and singles. I prefer singles, after listening to a Dr Jeremy Leonneke podcast about specificity (He maxes twice a week and deadlifts almost 3x his bodyweight). Did wonders for my back.
I also train in a gym owned by one of the strongest men in the world over the age of 40, hes a double / single repper aswell, on a weekly basis.
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Chris H

sirloin wrote:
spud wrote:
This is Doug Holland's YouTube Channel. The most recent upload was 23 May 2018, but it's all good stuff.

Interesting to note that all the deadlifting and squatting is for nowhere near a 1 RM at any point. It's always for reps, and they're all from a dead stop.

https://www.youtube.com/...chhelmet/videos

Am not surprised I guy who's 5'3 deads for reps. Nor that someone like Brian Shaw prefers doubles and singles. I prefer singles, after listening to a Dr Jeremy Leonneke podcast about specificity (He maxes twice a week and deadlifts almost 3x his bodyweight). Did wonders for my back.
I also train in a gym owned by one of the strongest men in the world over the age of 40, hes a double / single repper as well, on a weekly basis.


i agree.
Approaches are genetic and temperament approach, with the 2nd most likely linked with the first - IE the ability to perform an exercise, and the individual way to perform that exercise.
Shorter Guys are better suited for squats and deads, particularly squats, due to leverage.
Doug Holland stated on BBS several years ago, that probably only 10 men in a hundred were suited to squatting, and only 2 or 3 of the 10, had the temperment to squat {his observation}.
I cant perform barbell squats, in any variety effectively over 5 reps.
Same with deads, even TBDL, although with SLDL or RDL's, med - higher reps work well.



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Average Al

spud wrote:
This is Doug Holland's YouTube Channel. The most recent upload was 23 May 2018, but it's all good stuff.

Interesting to note that all the deadlifting and squatting is for nowhere near a 1 RM at any point. It's always for reps, and they're all from a dead stop.

https://www.youtube.com/.../videos


Those are some impressive lifts indeed. Doing more than double body weight dead-lifts and squats for reps is a level of strength that relatively few people ever reach, even when young. Doing it as you close in on 60 years of age is especially impressive.

Given that his chosen sport as a young man was power lifting, I think it likely that he is something of an outlier, one of those preternaturally strong guys who was built to compete at that sport. And I am going to guess that what he lifts today is significantly below what he did when younger and competing.

While I like doing squats and dead-lifts, and still try to do them as heavy as I can, they have caused me a lot of injuries. At 66, I can't seem to chase after numbers in dead-lifts anymore without regularly messing up stuff in my back. And squats to full depth seem to mess with something in my hip, once the weights start to get heavy (relatively speaking).

At some point, many of us have to make a decision: train to be pain free most of the time, or continue to chase performance in a handful of hallowed barbell lifts? Pain free is looking better and better the older I get.
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Brian A Schamber

Texas, USA

When Doug was like 11 years old he dead lifted 300 pounds.
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Average Al

Brian A Schamber wrote:
When Doug was like 11 years old he dead lifted 300 pounds.


Interesting, but not surprising. He is a dead lifting prodigy!

There is a power lifter named Greg Nukols, who runs an interesting site on strength training. He has said that he got to a 275 LB bench press while in high school, after having done very little actual bench pressing. He just did a lot of push-ups while training for high school football.


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sirloin

Chris H wrote:
sirloin wrote:
spud wrote:
This is Doug Holland's YouTube Channel. The most recent upload was 23 May 2018, but it's all good stuff.

Interesting to note that all the deadlifting and squatting is for nowhere near a 1 RM at any point. It's always for reps, and they're all from a dead stop.

https://www.youtube.com/...chhelmet/videos

Am not surprised I guy who's 5'3 deads for reps. Nor that someone like Brian Shaw prefers doubles and singles. I prefer singles, after listening to a Dr Jeremy Leonneke podcast about specificity (He maxes twice a week and deadlifts almost 3x his bodyweight). Did wonders for my back.
I also train in a gym owned by one of the strongest men in the world over the age of 40, hes a double / single repper as well, on a weekly basis.

i agree.
Approaches are genetic and temperament approach, with the 2nd most likely linked with the first - IE the ability to perform an exercise, and the individual way to perform that exercise.
Shorter Guys are better suited for squats and deads, particularly squats, due to leverage.
Doug Holland stated on BBS several years ago, that probably only 10 men in a hundred were suited to squatting, and only 2 or 3 of the 10, had the temperment to squat {his observation}.
I cant perform barbell squats, in any variety effectively over 5 reps.
Same with deads, even TBDL, although with SLDL or RDL's, med - higher reps work well.





For sure. Should point out, im specifically referring to the rep range. Many believe / imply that those whom preform singles regularly are reckless ego lifters / show off etc, Its not necessarily the case. For someone like Shaw or Thor for example, the distance they must cover is probably 2-3 times as much as someone like say Stefi Cohan, whos only 5ft and uses a sumo stance. For every 2-3 reps she does, it one of Shaws / Thors, the volumes the same.
Even using high handles on a trap bar, its a long pull for me, whereas in the gym i train at, theres guys a good foot shorter than me with long levers doing triples with the same weight. The volumes the same.


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Equity

sirloin wrote:
Chris H wrote:
sirloin wrote:
spud wrote:
This is Doug Holland's YouTube Channel. The most recent upload was 23 May 2018, but it's all good stuff.

Interesting to note that all the deadlifting and squatting is for nowhere near a 1 RM at any point. It's always for reps, and they're all from a dead stop.

https://www.youtube.com/...chhelmet/videos

Am not surprised I guy who's 5'3 deads for reps. Nor that someone like Brian Shaw prefers doubles and singles. I prefer singles, after listening to a Dr Jeremy Leonneke podcast about specificity (He maxes twice a week and deadlifts almost 3x his bodyweight). Did wonders for my back.
I also train in a gym owned by one of the strongest men in the world over the age of 40, hes a double / single repper as well, on a weekly basis.

i agree.
Approaches are genetic and temperament approach, with the 2nd most likely linked with the first - IE the ability to perform an exercise, and the individual way to perform that exercise.
Shorter Guys are better suited for squats and deads, particularly squats, due to leverage.
Doug Holland stated on BBS several years ago, that probably only 10 men in a hundred were suited to squatting, and only 2 or 3 of the 10, had the temperment to squat {his observation}.
I cant perform barbell squats, in any variety effectively over 5 reps.
Same with deads, even TBDL, although with SLDL or RDL's, med - higher reps work well.





For sure. Should point out, im specifically reffering to the rep range. Many believe / imply that those whom preform singles regularly are reckless ego lifters / show off etc, Its not necessarily the case. For someone like Shaw or Thor for example, the distance they must cover is probably 2-3 times as much as someone like say Stefi Cohan, whos only 5ft and uses a sumo stance. For every 2-3 reps she does, it one of Shaws / Thors, the volumes the same.
Even using high handles on a trap bar, its a long pull for me, whereas in the gym i train at, theres guys a good foot shorter than me with long levers doing triples with the same weight. The volumes the same.




Exactly Rob.

You can't evaluate strength by those comparisons.

I know of the individuals in question and by no means can you compare Ms. Cohen's lifts to the others.

Arthur Jones strived to produce machines that would measure exact strength testing...he failed but brought about the best possible apparatus to do so; so far.

On that topic does anyone know of someone to try to best Jones on this? Maybe Hutchins? I don't know enough about the subject at this time to comment.

Regards.
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1958

Texas, USA

Cool vids.I like Doug?s raw approach.No lifting belt or wraps on knees,and no grip straps.Looks like his only accessory is chalk.
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Chris H

sirloin wrote:
Chris H wrote:
sirloin wrote:
spud wrote:
This is Doug Holland's YouTube Channel. The most recent upload was 23 May 2018, but it's all good stuff.

Interesting to note that all the deadlifting and squatting is for nowhere near a 1 RM at any point. It's always for reps, and they're all from a dead stop.

https://www.youtube.com/...chhelmet/videos

Am not surprised I guy who's 5'3 deads for reps. Nor that someone like Brian Shaw prefers doubles and singles. I prefer singles, after listening to a Dr Jeremy Leonneke podcast about specificity (He maxes twice a week and deadlifts almost 3x his bodyweight). Did wonders for my back.
I also train in a gym owned by one of the strongest men in the world over the age of 40, hes a double / single repper as well, on a weekly basis.

i agree.
Approaches are genetic and temperament approach, with the 2nd most likely linked with the first - IE the ability to perform an exercise, and the individual way to perform that exercise.
Shorter Guys are better suited for squats and deads, particularly squats, due to leverage.
Doug Holland stated on BBS several years ago, that probably only 10 men in a hundred were suited to squatting, and only 2 or 3 of the 10, had the temperment to squat {his observation}.
I cant perform barbell squats, in any variety effectively over 5 reps.
Same with deads, even TBDL, although with SLDL or RDL's, med - higher reps work well.





For sure. Should point out, im specifically referring to the rep range. Many believe / imply that those whom preform singles regularly are reckless ego lifters / show off etc, Its not necessarily the case. For someone like Shaw or Thor for example, the distance they must cover is probably 2-3 times as much as someone like say Stefi Cohan, whos only 5ft and uses a sumo stance. For every 2-3 reps she does, it one of Shaws / Thors, the volumes the same.
Even using high handles on a trap bar, its a long pull for me, whereas in the gym i train at, theres guys a good foot shorter than me with long levers doing triples with the same weight. The volumes the same.




Good point Rob.
I have experimented with singles on the TBDL, but with 15 - 30sec breaks, for 12 - 15 reps, around 80% of 1 rep max.
Harder than it sounds, but an effective stimulus, without negatively over loading my lanky body - lol
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sirloin

Chris H wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Chris H wrote:
sirloin wrote:
spud wrote:
This is Doug Holland's YouTube Channel. The most recent upload was 23 May 2018, but it's all good stuff.

Interesting to note that all the deadlifting and squatting is for nowhere near a 1 RM at any point. It's always for reps, and they're all from a dead stop.

https://www.youtube.com/...chhelmet/videos

Am not surprised I guy who's 5'3 deads for reps. Nor that someone like Brian Shaw prefers doubles and singles. I prefer singles, after listening to a Dr Jeremy Leonneke podcast about specificity (He maxes twice a week and deadlifts almost 3x his bodyweight). Did wonders for my back.
I also train in a gym owned by one of the strongest men in the world over the age of 40, hes a double / single repper as well, on a weekly basis.

i agree.
Approaches are genetic and temperament approach, with the 2nd most likely linked with the first - IE the ability to perform an exercise, and the individual way to perform that exercise.
Shorter Guys are better suited for squats and deads, particularly squats, due to leverage.
Doug Holland stated on BBS several years ago, that probably only 10 men in a hundred were suited to squatting, and only 2 or 3 of the 10, had the temperment to squat {his observation}.
I cant perform barbell squats, in any variety effectively over 5 reps.
Same with deads, even TBDL, although with SLDL or RDL's, med - higher reps work well.





For sure. Should point out, im specifically referring to the rep range. Many believe / imply that those whom preform singles regularly are reckless ego lifters / show off etc, Its not necessarily the case. For someone like Shaw or Thor for example, the distance they must cover is probably 2-3 times as much as someone like say Stefi Cohan, whos only 5ft and uses a sumo stance. For every 2-3 reps she does, it one of Shaws / Thors, the volumes the same.
Even using high handles on a trap bar, its a long pull for me, whereas in the gym i train at, theres guys a good foot shorter than me with long levers doing triples with the same weight. The volumes the same.




Good point Rob.
I have experimented with singles on the TBDL, but with 15 - 30sec breaks, for 12 - 15 reps, around 80% of 1 rep max.
Harder than it sounds, but an effective stimulus, without negatively over loading my lanky body - lol


That works too, in fact powerlifter Mark Bell recently advocated just that, i.e., treating each rep on a muilti set deadlift as if their singles, pausing for a few seconds after each and hitting a "reset button" of sorts. EMOM brought my bench press up after a while of little progress. Must give it a try on TBDLs. Cheers



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