MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
Doug Holland is on Instagram
First | Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
Author
Rating
Options

spud

More info from Doug:


I deadlift every other week with variations on barbell from floor, barbell while standing on elevated surface, trap bar (low handles), or 2? diameter thick bar.

My clients who deadlift do so every other week utilizing the trap bar.

I still squat with a barbell but only two or three times per year for high reps (25-30). At age 60, I prefer one of my Hammer leg press machines or my Frank Zane leg blaster for year round use.


Here is a video of Doug using the frank Zane Leg Blaster:

https://www.instagram.com/.../p/B-vDJDiA9p_/

Here's a quick tour of the majority of Doug's gym:

https://www.instagram.com/.../p/B-NTg6xgiHq/

====

It's interesting to see how Doug trains at age 60. He still goes to failure but it's low volume and low frequency. His training consists of 1 to 3 exercises every 4th day, all compound movements. He hardly ever squats with a barbell, and only deadlifts once every ~14 days in the range of 360 to 410 pounds, usually aiming for 6 to 8 reps. He isn't shy about taking 6 to 8 weeks off deadlifting if he feels any ill effects.

It's not working too badly for Doug. He can deadlift around 2.4x bodyweight for 6 reps at age 60. I'm not sure I'll be doing that. I'd like to though. Need to get the right equipment for the garage first!

Something I've been thinking about recently, and it's been talked about previously in various forms, is how nobody actually trains very much.

Stay with me.

If you look at anyone on this forum, even those who advocate multiple sets, split routines and all the things that HIT opposes, if you just looked at the cumulative time those people actually spent performing repetitions across all sets, all exercise and all sessions you'd probably discover that very few people here were actually training more than 30 or 40 minutes per week.

I'm not talking about time spent resting between sets, time spent recording performance in a notebook or on a phone, time spent choosing the playlist for the workout, time spent chalking your hands, putting on wraps, straps and belts, time spent loading and unloading bars or adjusting seat positions, time spent sipping water, time spent psyching yourself up for a lift.

I'm only thinking in terms of time spent lifting i.e. performing repetitions. You can include warm-up sets if you do any.

Every time I see someone say that you can't get in shape training just 10 minutes a week and it's a lie or people trying to sell you something, it makes me chuckle.

For all that person knows, they're probably only training 25 minutes a week, even though their sessions last an hour or more and the feel like they invested a lot of time and that they are more committed and dedicated as a result.

The other factor to think about here is that so much of what we consider to be "being in great shape" is down to diet and has little to do with training.

I'm going to experiment on myself and report the results in my own thread regarding how much time I spend training.
Open User Options Menu

Donnie Hunt

spud wrote:
More info from Doug:


I deadlift every other week with variations on barbell from floor, barbell while standing on elevated surface, trap bar (low handles), or 2? diameter thick bar.

My clients who deadlift do so every other week utilizing the trap bar.

I still squat with a barbell but only two or three times per year for high reps (25-30). At age 60, I prefer one of my Hammer leg press machines or my Frank Zane leg blaster for year round use.


Here is a video of Doug using the frank Zane Leg Blaster:

https://www.instagram.com/.../p/B-vDJDiA9p_/

Here's a quick tour of the majority of Doug's gym:

https://www.instagram.com/.../p/B-NTg6xgiHq/

====

It's interesting to see how Doug trains at age 60. He still goes to failure but it's low volume and low frequency. His training consists of 1 to 3 exercises every 4th day, all compound movements. He hardly ever squats with a barbell, and only deadlifts once every ~14 days in the range of 360 to 410 pounds, usually aiming for 6 to 8 reps. He isn't shy about taking 6 to 8 weeks off deadlifting if he feels any ill effects.

It's not working too badly for Doug. He can deadlift around 2.4x bodyweight for 6 reps at age 60. I'm not sure I'll be doing that. I'd like to though. Need to get the right equipment for the garage first!

Something I've been thinking about recently, and it's been talked about previously in various forms, is how nobody actually trains very much.

Stay with me.

If you look at anyone on this forum, even those who advocate multiple sets, split routines and all the things that HIT opposes, if you just looked at the cumulative time those people actually spent performing repetitions across all sets, all exercise and all sessions you'd probably discover that very few people here were actually training more than 30 or 40 minutes per week.

I'm not talking about time spent resting between sets, time spent recording performance in a notebook or on a phone, time spent choosing the playlist for the workout, time spent chalking your hands, putting on wraps, straps and belts, time spent loading and unloading bars or adjusting seat positions, time spent sipping water, time spent psyching yourself up for a lift.

I'm only thinking in terms of time spent lifting i.e. performing repetitions. You can include warm-up sets if you do any.

Every time I see someone say that you can't get in shape training just 10 minutes a week and it's a lie or people trying to sell you something, it makes me chuckle.

For all that person knows, they're probably only training 25 minutes a week, even though their sessions last an hour or more and the feel like they invested a lot of time and that they are more committed and dedicated as a result.

The other factor to think about here is that so much of what we consider to be "being in great shape" is down to diet and has little to do with training.

I'm going to experiment on myself and report the results in my own thread regarding how much time I spend training.


Open User Options Menu

Average Al

spud wrote:

If you look at anyone on this forum, even those who advocate multiple sets, split routines and all the things that HIT opposes, if you just looked at the cumulative time those people actually spent performing repetitions across all sets, all exercise and all sessions you'd probably discover that very few people here were actually training more than 30 or 40 minutes per week.

I'm not talking about time spent resting between sets, time spent recording performance in a notebook or on a phone, time spent choosing the playlist for the workout, time spent chalking your hands, putting on wraps, straps and belts, time spent loading and unloading bars or adjusting seat positions, time spent sipping water, time spent psyching yourself up for a lift.


I'm sure you are correct that the actual time spent lifting is not that long, even for many people doing multiple sets. The exception might be Arnold style high volume, 20 sets per body part, where you train half the afternoon. But very few people actually do that.

But the second paragraph, which emphasizes wasting time between sets, is a bit of a straw man. Taking long rests between sets of heavy lifts is a deliberate strategy for many people, one that is especially popular among people training for strength. For those guys, intra set rest periods are for recovery, just like some HIT guys only train once a week for recovery. And there are some studies which suggest that longer rest periods can be better for strength and muscle growth.

For myself, doing multiple sets with short rest times is unsatisfying and feels unproductive, like doing hard work for no particular purpose. That's because if you do sets across, then you have to be under loaded in the early sets, and you don't get close to high effort in the early sets.

So depending on time availability and objectives, I use one of two approaches:

(1) Single set to failure, with emphasis on fatiguing muscles. If I want more volume than I got from the single set, I may add a drop set, done with a short rest, for additional inroad. I tend to use this approach with isolation (single joint) exercises and on machines that allow me to focus on a particular muscle group.

(2) Multiple sets with long rest intervals (3 to 5 minutes). Here I am trying to use as much weight as possible, and not focused so much on inroad or fatigue. The long rests allow me to keep the weight and level of effort high for each set. I tend to use this with compound barbell movements (squat, deadlfit, overhead press).



Open User Options Menu

epdavis7

spud wrote:
More info from Doug:


I deadlift every other week with variations on barbell from floor, barbell while standing on elevated surface, trap bar (low handles), or 2? diameter thick bar.

My clients who deadlift do so every other week utilizing the trap bar.

I still squat with a barbell but only two or three times per year for high reps (25-30). At age 60, I prefer one of my Hammer leg press machines or my Frank Zane leg blaster for year round use.


Here is a video of Doug using the frank Zane Leg Blaster:

https://www.instagram.com/.../p/B-vDJDiA9p_/

Here's a quick tour of the majority of Doug's gym:

https://www.instagram.com/.../p/B-NTg6xgiHq/

====

It's interesting to see how Doug trains at age 60. He still goes to failure but it's low volume and low frequency. His training consists of 1 to 3 exercises every 4th day, all compound movements. He hardly ever squats with a barbell, and only deadlifts once every ~14 days in the range of 360 to 410 pounds, usually aiming for 6 to 8 reps. He isn't shy about taking 6 to 8 weeks off deadlifting if he feels any ill effects.

It's not working too badly for Doug. He can deadlift around 2.4x bodyweight for 6 reps at age 60. I'm not sure I'll be doing that. I'd like to though. Need to get the right equipment for the garage first!

Something I've been thinking about recently, and it's been talked about previously in various forms, is how nobody actually trains very much.

Stay with me.

If you look at anyone on this forum, even those who advocate multiple sets, split routines and all the things that HIT opposes, if you just looked at the cumulative time those people actually spent performing repetitions across all sets, all exercise and all sessions you'd probably discover that very few people here were actually training more than 30 or 40 minutes per week.

I'm not talking about time spent resting between sets, time spent recording performance in a notebook or on a phone, time spent choosing the playlist for the workout, time spent chalking your hands, putting on wraps, straps and belts, time spent loading and unloading bars or adjusting seat positions, time spent sipping water, time spent psyching yourself up for a lift.

I'm only thinking in terms of time spent lifting i.e. performing repetitions. You can include warm-up sets if you do any.

Every time I see someone say that you can't get in shape training just 10 minutes a week and it's a lie or people trying to sell you something, it makes me chuckle.

For all that person knows, they're probably only training 25 minutes a week, even though their sessions last an hour or more and the feel like they invested a lot of time and that they are more committed and dedicated as a result.

The other factor to think about here is that so much of what we consider to be "being in great shape" is down to diet and has little to do with training.

I'm going to experiment on myself and report the results in my own thread regarding how much time I spend training.


No doubt. Much of the aesthetics for non-steroid users is maintaining a low bodyfat percentage. I'm 54. I doubt I'll put on much more muscle at this age. I'll get stronger on an exercise, but its usually one I haven't done in awhile. Losing your belly while maintaining what muscle you have will make a huge difference in appearance. You'll also feel a lot better both physically and mentally and have more energy. I would no doubt make better progress if I didn't run or do self defense training, but its a tradeoff I'm willing to make because I like doing those things. My actual weight training is no more than 15 minutes once a week. It works for me. I am not lazy. I work my ass off aside from "exercise." I just don't find doing more is any more effective for my purposes and I can use the extra time to do things I enjoy
Open User Options Menu
First | Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy