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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
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Video: Negative Work and Full Range Exercise feat. Dick Butkus
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Equity

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=RyqbSaYkV5w

Very interesting video that I've never come across before.

Featured topics include:

Force plate analysis of explosive movements vs slower movements.

Momentum in exercise.

Isokinetics and their drawbacks.

And a bunch of other stuff well worth watching if you haven't already seen it.

Enjoy!

Regards.
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Average Al

Equity wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=RyqbSaYkV5w

Very interesting video that I've never come across before.

Featured topics include:

Force plate analysis of explosive movements vs slower movements.

Momentum in exercise.

Isokinetics and their drawbacks.

And a bunch of other stuff well worth watching if you haven't already seen it.

Enjoy!

Regards.


Who knew Dick Butkus was so smart!
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Equity

Average Al wrote:
Equity wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=RyqbSaYkV5w

Very interesting video that I've never come across before.

Featured topics include:

Force plate analysis of explosive movements vs slower movements.

Momentum in exercise.

Isokinetics and their drawbacks.

And a bunch of other stuff well worth watching if you haven't already seen it.

Enjoy!

Regards.

Who knew Dick Butkus was so smart!


Ha! Ha! lol!!!

Yes it wasn't Jones or Dr. Darden who came up with all them principles of productive exercise it was Butkus all along! Who'd have thunk it!

He did a good job of presenting though; more articulate than I'd imagined.

Regards.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

===Scott===
Yes Butkus does a fine job of presenting! I was neat seeing Casey on all those old machines in action!
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sirloin

That was horrible to watch. Looked more like a sales pitch. It talked about momentum, yet there was people yanking and flinging weights, and worse still, using the stretch relax to help them lift the weight, whicb can be an issue with negatives.

Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.
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Equity

entsminger wrote:
===Scott===
Yes Butkus does a fine job of presenting! I was neat seeing Casey on all those old machines in action!


You might find this interesting then. Casey V posing practice 1978.

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=_FeUGNGOJzU

Regards.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

sirloin wrote:
That was horrible to watch. Looked more like a sales pitch. It talked about momentum, yet there was people yanking and flinging weights, and worse still, using the stretch relax to help them lift the weight, whicb can be an issue with negatives.

Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.


==Scott==
Really , Horrible? I thought it was well done for a beast football player like Dick Butkus who if you didn't really know him you might think he'd have trouble forming complete sentences, ha ha.The only yanking and flinging weights I saw was a demonstration of yanking and flinging weights and yes it was a sales pitch, but aren't they all?
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hit4me

Florida, USA

Nice.....great explanation and demonstration of force and momentum
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sirloin

entsminger wrote:
sirloin wrote:
That was horrible to watch. Looked more like a sales pitch. It talked about momentum, yet there was people yanking and flinging weights, and worse still, using the stretch relax to help them lift the weight, whicb can be an issue with negatives.

Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.

==Scott==
Really , Horrible? I thought it was well done for a beast football player like Dick Butkus who if you didn't really know him you might think he'd have trouble forming complete sentences, ha ha.The only yanking and flinging weights I saw was a demonstration of yanking and flinging weights and yes it was a sales pitch, but aren't they all?


Horrible in the sense that its a sales pitch to try and convince people to buy equipment they never needed.

Yes, there was yanking and flinging, i.e., the use of mommentum (the very thing they where talking about not using lol) in the west point section, as well as the use of the stretch reflex to aid the lifting portion of the exercise.

Id also say, if the weightlifting (which btw is an explosive sport) coach at the end of the video had have took a look in the gyms of the countries that where dominating weightligting, he have found nothing but very basic equipment. They didnt have much time for expensive fancy machines, inspite of spending millions on training research aswell.

Never heard of that man, until now, American football isnt that big here.

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Average Al

sirloin wrote:
Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.


Wikipedia tells me that there is a large collection of his papers at the University of Tennessee. But I only found one old (1946) book that was written by him, and google doesn't turn up much beyond an obituary and a brief biography. Given that he died in 1970, I suppose that isn't too surprising.

I'm wondering how you learned about his training recommendations?

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sirloin

Average Al wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.

Wikipedia tells me that there is a large collection of his papers at the University of Tennessee. But I only found one old (1946) book that was written by him, and google doesn't turn up much beyond an obituary and a brief biography. Given that he died in 1970, I suppose that isn't too surprising.

I'm wondering how you learned about his training recommendations?



Hey Al,

John Little talked about him in hes high intensity nation interview. He also mentioned him in the MCT books.

If you goggle "Arthur Steinhaus isometrics", theres free dowloadable books and papers.
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Ellington Darden

Average Al wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.

Wikipedia tells me that there is a large collection of his papers at the University of Tennessee. But I only found one old (1946) book that was written by him, and google doesn't turn up much beyond an obituary and a brief biography. Given that he died in 1970, I suppose that isn't too surprising.

I'm wondering how you learned about his training recommendations?



In the spring of 1969, Dr. Arthur Steinhaus was hired by Florida State University to take over the Exercise Physiology department in the fall of that same year. He visited for several days and gave multiple lectures, which were outstanding. Dr. Steinhaus was down to earth, talkative, and reminded me of my favorite uncle from childhood. I was signed to take his course that September.

Unfortunately, he became ill and never moved to Tallahassee. I remember writing to him in Illinois and he sent me many of his previously published studies. He died approximately a year later.

Ellington


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Equity

Just noticed a very young looking Dr. Darden supervising a trainee during the West Point segment on this vid at 11.20!
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sirloin

Ellington Darden wrote:
Average Al wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.

Wikipedia tells me that there is a large collection of his papers at the University of Tennessee. But I only found one old (1946) book that was written by him, and google doesn't turn up much beyond an obituary and a brief biography. Given that he died in 1970, I suppose that isn't too surprising.

I'm wondering how you learned about his training recommendations?



In the spring of 1969, Dr. Arthur Steinhaus was hired by Florida State University to take over the Exercise Physiology department in the fall of that same year. He visited for several days and gave multiple lectures, which were outstanding. Dr. Steinhaus was down to earth, talkative, and reminded me of my favorite uncle from childhood. I was signed to take his course that September.

Unfortunately, he became ill and never moved to Tallahassee. I remember writing to him in Illinois and he sent me many of his previously published studies. He died approximately a year later.

Ellington




Thats fantastic, but also very unfortunate. Thanks.

Im more interested in the research from such individuals, they seemed really passionate with understanding the body, a find a lot research i read today is the minutiae.
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Average Al

sirloin wrote:
Average Al wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.

Wikipedia tells me that there is a large collection of his papers at the University of Tennessee. But I only found one old (1946) book that was written by him, and google doesn't turn up much beyond an obituary and a brief biography. Given that he died in 1970, I suppose that isn't too surprising.

I'm wondering how you learned about his training recommendations?



Hey Al,

John Little talked about him in hes high intensity nation interview. He also mentioned him in the MCT books.

If you goggle "Arthur Steinhaus isometrics", theres free dowloadable books and papers.


Thanks for the info!
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Equity

sirloin wrote:
Average Al wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.

Wikipedia tells me that there is a large collection of his papers at the University of Tennessee. But I only found one old (1946) book that was written by him, and google doesn't turn up much beyond an obituary and a brief biography. Given that he died in 1970, I suppose that isn't too surprising.

I'm wondering how you learned about his training recommendations?



Hey Al,

John Little talked about him in hes high intensity nation interview. He also mentioned him in the MCT books.

If you goggle "Arthur Steinhaus isometrics", theres free dowloadable books and papers.


Rob,

Do you do stretching along with the isometrics? In the video of the 9 principles of full range exercise it states negative work is necessary for stretching.

On another note... trigger points; the 'knots' formed in muscles with people who are usually highly stressed (traps/shoulders usually) would be because of static contractions and need 'kneading out bread lol!!!', massage basically. Straight to the point do you stretch after the iso's?

Regards!

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sirloin

Equity wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Average Al wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.

Wikipedia tells me that there is a large collection of his papers at the University of Tennessee. But I only found one old (1946) book that was written by him, and google doesn't turn up much beyond an obituary and a brief biography. Given that he died in 1970, I suppose that isn't too surprising.

I'm wondering how you learned about his training recommendations?



Hey Al,

John Little talked about him in hes high intensity nation interview. He also mentioned him in the MCT books.

If you goggle "Arthur Steinhaus isometrics", theres free dowloadable books and papers.

Rob,

Do you do stretching along with the isometrics? In the video of the 9 principles of full range exercise it states negative work is necessary for stretching.

On another note... trigger points; the 'knots' formed in muscles with people who are usually highly stressed (traps/shoulders usually) would be because of static contractions and need 'kneading out bread lol!!!', massage basically. Straight to the point do you stretch after the iso's?

Regards!



Its something i never used to do, given that i was preforming negatives. But this last year of so its now something i doing a lot of, as well as getting a deep tissue massage every now and then.

On a side note, my sis-in-law who am training was getting a lot of fibro pain in her calfs and traps. Weighted stretching has help it a lot, rack pulls, super yoke zercher holds and carries have worked great for pain relief she saids. At the end of every workout i also get her to sit of a seated calf raise machine and i apply pressure, slowly building into the stretch and releasing etc.

Cheers

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Equity

sirloin wrote:
Equity wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Average Al wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.

Wikipedia tells me that there is a large collection of his papers at the University of Tennessee. But I only found one old (1946) book that was written by him, and google doesn't turn up much beyond an obituary and a brief biography. Given that he died in 1970, I suppose that isn't too surprising.

I'm wondering how you learned about his training recommendations?



Hey Al,

John Little talked about him in hes high intensity nation interview. He also mentioned him in the MCT books.

If you goggle "Arthur Steinhaus isometrics", theres free dowloadable books and papers.

Rob,

Do you do stretching along with the isometrics? In the video of the 9 principles of full range exercise it states negative work is necessary for stretching.

On another note... trigger points; the 'knots' formed in muscles with people who are usually highly stressed (traps/shoulders usually) would be because of static contractions and need 'kneading out bread lol!!!', massage basically. Straight to the point do you stretch after the iso's?

Regards!



Its something i never used to do, given that i was preforming negatives. But this last year of so its now something i doing a lot of, as well as getting a deep tissue massage every now and then.

On a side note, my sis-in-law who am training was getting a lot of fibro pain in her calfs and traps. Weighted stretching has help it a lot, rack pulls, super yoke zercher holds and carries have worked great for pain relief she saids. At the end of every workout i also get her to sit of a seated calf raise machine and i apply pressure, slowly building into the stretch and releasing etc.

Cheers



Thanks for the reply.

A question :

Deep tissue massage in lieu of stretching with isos? Generally speaking as you have your sister in law do kinda both. I'm just wondering could massage on it's own cure rigidity from isometric contractions.

Regards.
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sirloin

Equity wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Equity wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Average Al wrote:
sirloin wrote:
Think ill stick with deadstarts and static holds, the latter was advocated by Prof Arthur Steinhaus, regarded as the godfather of western physiology.

Wikipedia tells me that there is a large collection of his papers at the University of Tennessee. But I only found one old (1946) book that was written by him, and google doesn't turn up much beyond an obituary and a brief biography. Given that he died in 1970, I suppose that isn't too surprising.

I'm wondering how you learned about his training recommendations?



Hey Al,

John Little talked about him in hes high intensity nation interview. He also mentioned him in the MCT books.

If you goggle "Arthur Steinhaus isometrics", theres free dowloadable books and papers.

Rob,

Do you do stretching along with the isometrics? In the video of the 9 principles of full range exercise it states negative work is necessary for stretching.

On another note... trigger points; the 'knots' formed in muscles with people who are usually highly stressed (traps/shoulders usually) would be because of static contractions and need 'kneading out bread lol!!!', massage basically. Straight to the point do you stretch after the iso's?

Regards!



Its something i never used to do, given that i was preforming negatives. But this last year of so its now something i doing a lot of, as well as getting a deep tissue massage every now and then.

On a side note, my sis-in-law who am training was getting a lot of fibro pain in her calfs and traps. Weighted stretching has help it a lot, rack pulls, super yoke zercher holds and carries have worked great for pain relief she saids. At the end of every workout i also get her to sit of a seated calf raise machine and i apply pressure, slowly building into the stretch and releasing etc.

Cheers



Thanks for the reply.

A question :

Deep tissue massage in lieu of stretching with isos? Generally speaking as you have your sister in law do kinda both. I'm just wondering could massage on it's own cure rigidity from isometric contractions.

Regards.


Oh no, i mean i get DTM just a few times per year, but i stretch after every workout. The sis-in-law doesnt get the DTM she says couldnt bare it with the fibro.
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