MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Dr. Darden: New Book Update?
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robinn3403

Got an update for us on the new BB Book? Hope its ready!!
Thanks!
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Ellington Darden

All my publishing contacts say there's too much free stuff about bodybuilding on the Internet. Therefore, no one wants to publish a book on bodybuilding because it won't sell.

Maybe things will change in a couple of years?

Ellington
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Nwlifter

Ellington Darden wrote:
All my publishing contacts say there's too much free stuff about bodybuilding on the Internet. Therefore, no one wants to publish a book on bodybuilding because it won't sell.

Maybe things will change in a couple of years?

Ellington


What about one of those services where they print the book per order and you keep the profit from each? instead of pre-printing a big quantity and hoping they sell?

It really annoys me how 'print' material is fading out. I HATE ebooks, I love a real book I can hold and look at without having to boot my friggen computer up.

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HeavyHitter32

Nwlifter wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
All my publishing contacts say there's too much free stuff about bodybuilding on the Internet. Therefore, no one wants to publish a book on bodybuilding because it won't sell.

Maybe things will change in a couple of years?

Ellington

What about one of those services where they print the book per order and you keep the profit from each? instead of pre-printing a big quantity and hoping they sell?

It really annoys me how 'print' material is fading out. I HATE ebooks, I love a real book I can hold and look at without having to boot my friggen computer up.



Agreed.
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Average Al

Nwlifter wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
All my publishing contacts say there's too much free stuff about bodybuilding on the Internet. Therefore, no one wants to publish a book on bodybuilding because it won't sell.

Maybe things will change in a couple of years?

Ellington

What about one of those services where they print the book per order and you keep the profit from each? instead of pre-printing a big quantity and hoping they sell?

It really annoys me how 'print' material is fading out. I HATE ebooks, I love a real book I can hold and look at without having to boot my friggen computer up.



I wonder how often self published books yield a decent financial return for the authors? My impression is that it involves a lot more work and up-front costs on the part of the author, and if sales end up being low (which is often the case), then little money is made for the effort involved.
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Average Al

Very much a tangent, but I found this interesting essay while looking for general information on the economics of self publishing print books:

https://www.waverlyfitzgerald....

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Ellington Darden

Average Al,

The article about self-publishing is mostly true. Very few people make any money at all on such endeavors. I'm probably going to do an eBook soon, but it will be condensed and short: about 70 pages.

Ellington
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Lioncourt

Ellington Darden wrote:
Average Al,

The article about self-publishing is mostly true. Very few people make any money at all on such endeavors. I'm probably going to do an eBook soon, but it will be condensed and short: about 70 pages.

Ellington


This sounds very exciting to me. Unlike others in this discussion I prefer digital books so I can have them anywhere on my iPad. Your last 3 I have only ordered the Kindle versions.
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Nwlifter

Average Al wrote:
Nwlifter wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
All my publishing contacts say there's too much free stuff about bodybuilding on the Internet. Therefore, no one wants to publish a book on bodybuilding because it won't sell.

Maybe things will change in a couple of years?

Ellington

What about one of those services where they print the book per order and you keep the profit from each? instead of pre-printing a big quantity and hoping they sell?

It really annoys me how 'print' material is fading out. I HATE ebooks, I love a real book I can hold and look at without having to boot my friggen computer up.



I wonder how often self published books yield a decent financial return for the authors? My impression is that it involves a lot more work and up-front costs on the part of the author, and if sales end up being low (which is often the case), then little money is made for the effort involved.


I know there are some services where they charge the author 'per book' when printed and shipped, so not an up front cost thing, If it costs the author 12 per book, they can sell to us at like 20 for example, we pay, they take 12 of the 20, print and send a book and keep 8 bucks.
I think that is how thoes Vince Gironda books were done recently.
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Nwlifter

Lioncourt wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
Average Al,

The article about self-publishing is mostly true. Very few people make any money at all on such endeavors. I'm probably going to do an eBook soon, but it will be condensed and short: about 70 pages.

Ellington

This sounds very exciting to me. Unlike others in this discussion I prefer digital books so I can have them anywhere on my iPad. Your last 3 I have only ordered the Kindle versions.


oh wow, never met anyone that prefers digital, I love having a real book, seeing it on the shelf, and not having to look at a bright screen while reading it. I love picking up an old book I bought back in the 80's, it reminds me of those days...

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Nwlifter

Ellington Darden wrote:
Average Al,

The article about self-publishing is mostly true. Very few people make any money at all on such endeavors. I'm probably going to do an eBook soon, but it will be condensed and short: about 70 pages.

Ellington


I was thinking like this... (this shows a bunch of choices, one pasted below)
https://www.google.com/...print+on+demand

Print on Demand. KDP's print on demand service allows you to self-publish your book in paperback and sell it on Amazon websites in the US, Europe, and Japan, as well as other retail book sellers through KDP's Expanded Distribution channels. You don't have to pay any costs upfront or carry any inventory.

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hit4me

Florida, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
Average Al,

The article about self-publishing is mostly true. Very few people make any money at all on such endeavors. I'm probably going to do an eBook soon, but it will be condensed and short: about 70 pages.

Ellington


I will definitely purchase the EBOOK
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Ellington Darden

Nwlifter,

As you know, my previous hardback and paperback books are loaded with photos. That makes a huge difference in self-publishing, especially if you want to do photos in color.

I have a lot of color photos that I'd like to use in the future. Most of the successful self-published books contain just words and no photos.

Ellington

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Average Al

Nwlifter wrote:
Lioncourt wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
Average Al,

The article about self-publishing is mostly true. Very few people make any money at all on such endeavors. I'm probably going to do an eBook soon, but it will be condensed and short: about 70 pages.

Ellington

This sounds very exciting to me. Unlike others in this discussion I prefer digital books so I can have them anywhere on my iPad. Your last 3 I have only ordered the Kindle versions.

oh wow, never met anyone that prefers digital, I love having a real book, seeing it on the shelf, and not having to look at a bright screen while reading it. I love picking up an old book I bought back in the 80's, it reminds me of those days...



I love books. I'd guess that over the course of my life, I must have purchased an owned well over 1,000, maybe more if I start counting cheap paperbacks that I've since given away. At some point, storage becomes an issue.

In my home office right now, I have 500 or so books on shelves that span a 16-ft space on a wall, floor to ceiling. I've got several more boxes in the garage, destined for Half Price Books or the World Book drop off bin.

Many are professional reference books (engineering) or college text books that I am reluctant to part with just because they were so damn expensive. Then there is a lot of personal interest stuff: exercise, home improvement reference books, history, general science, lots of science fiction.

These days, I buy a print book only if it has lots of graphics (photos, charts and tables) or it is a book that I know I am really going to love, and want to refer back to later.

For pulp fiction, or text only books, I tend to get digital, because the digital format is great for text only, and there is nothing to store. Plus they tend to be cheaper.

Once, on a vacation, I took along a copy of Neal Stephenson's "Anathem". It is a huge book, 700-800 pages, and lugging it around to read on the beach or by the pool was a real pain because it was just so damn big. In contrast, when I got "Atlas Shrugged", which is also a huge book, I read it on a Kindle Reader. It was so much more convenient from the standpoint of physically handling it. No tiny print or show through from thin paper, and no thick and stiff binding to break, in order to get the book to lie flat.

So for me, different use cases mean different preferences.


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Nwlifter

Ellington Darden wrote:
Nwlifter,

As you know, my previous hardback and paperback books are loaded with photos. That makes a huge difference in self-publishing, especially if you want to do photos in color.

I have a lot of color photos that I'd like to use in the future. Most of the successful self-published books contain just words and no photos.

Ellington



oh ok, makes them so expensive that you can't charge enough to cover all that (with color photos)?

dang... I love your books, I love real books, I always have one on the end table by our sofa to look at and read, hate to think that era might be over.

OK do an ebook, I'll pay to have it made into a real book myself just for me lol. (I might really do that :) )

But no matter what I hope you write some format of book again, always enjoy them so much.
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Nwlifter

Average Al wrote:
Nwlifter wrote:
Lioncourt wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
Average Al,

The article about self-publishing is mostly true. Very few people make any money at all on such endeavors. I'm probably going to do an eBook soon, but it will be condensed and short: about 70 pages.

Ellington

This sounds very exciting to me. Unlike others in this discussion I prefer digital books so I can have them anywhere on my iPad. Your last 3 I have only ordered the Kindle versions.

oh wow, never met anyone that prefers digital, I love having a real book, seeing it on the shelf, and not having to look at a bright screen while reading it. I love picking up an old book I bought back in the 80's, it reminds me of those days...



I love books. I'd guess that over the course of my life, I must have purchased an owned well over 1,000, maybe more if I start counting cheap paperbacks that I've since given away. At some point, storage becomes an issue.

In my home office right now, I have 500 or so books on shelves that span a 16-ft space on a wall, floor to ceiling. I've got several more boxes in the garage, destined for Half Price Books or the World Book drop off bin.

Many are professional reference books (engineering) or college text books that I am reluctant to part with just because they were so damn expensive. Then there is a lot of personal interest stuff: exercise, home improvement reference books, history, general science, lots of science fiction.

These days, I buy a print book only if it has lots of graphics (photos, charts and tables) or it is a book that I know I am really going to love, and want to refer back to later.

For pulp fiction, or text only books, I tend to get digital, because the digital format is great for text only, and there is nothing to store. Plus they tend to be cheaper.

Once, on a vacation, I took along a copy of Neal Stephenson's "Anathem". It is a huge book, 700-800 pages, and lugging it around to read on the beach or by the pool was a real pain because it was just so damn big. In contrast, when I got "Atlas Shrugged", which is also a huge book, I read it on a Kindle Reader. It was so much more convenient from the standpoint of physically handling it. No tiny print or show through from thin paper, and no thick and stiff binding to break, in order to get the book to lie flat.

So for me, different use cases mean different preferences.




man me too, we have right now probably hundreds of 'real books' (all subjects), I have a ton of muscle related books. I myself just love real books, ebooks you can't put a bookmark in, just pick it up real quick and read a bit, you have to have some device with you to read. If your outside the screen glare... or battery starts to die... man. I just freaken hate ebooks lol

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Rikus

Ellington Darden wrote:
All my publishing contacts say there's too much free stuff about bodybuilding on the Internet. Therefore, no one wants to publish a book on bodybuilding because it won't sell.

Maybe things will change in a couple of years?

Ellington


This is kind of sad for me. I still remember ordering and getting Massive Muscles in 10 weeks around 1991. And then every book after that (and some from before). Your books have been part of my weight training life. it wasn't Arthur Jones or Mentzer, it was Darden's books for me.

I don't think things will change in a few years. Content is via YouTube a lot now. Magazines are dead. Books can still sell via Amazon, but I personally mostly buy Kindle versions now. Something I want to collect I'll buy the book.

But I'll still be excited to read what you have. Even if it's in some other form than a nice paper back book.

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Donnie Hunt

I had "The Nautilus Book" 1990 version ?, and "Grow" in physical/real books. I had "The Bodyfat Breakthrough" in digital form.

Looking forward to reading your new book however you release it Dr. Darden.
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Nwlifter

Rikus wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
All my publishing contacts say there's too much free stuff about bodybuilding on the Internet. Therefore, no one wants to publish a book on bodybuilding because it won't sell.

Maybe things will change in a couple of years?

Ellington

This is kind of sad for me. I still remember ordering and getting Massive Muscles in 10 weeks around 1991. And then every book after that (and some from before). Your books have been part of my weight training life. it wasn't Arthur Jones or Mentzer, it was Darden's books for me.

I don't think things will change in a few years. Content is via YouTube a lot now. Magazines are dead. Books can still sell via Amazon, but I personally mostly buy Kindle versions now. Something I want to collect I'll buy the book.

But I'll still be excited to read what you have. Even if it's in some other form than a nice paper back book.



Me too, I used to buy all my books from book stores. I remember going in and zipping to the exercise section, seeing all the BB books, then if I had the money, buying one and being so excited to get home and read it.

My introduction to HIT was when I saw and bought El's book, 'Super High Intensity Bodybuilding'. Me and my wife were first married when I got it. I still look at that 30 year old book, it's ragged, but still has the same 'book smell' when I open it that takes me back to when I got it so many many years ago. His writing style is so captivating and interesting.

For me, BIG and MM in 10 weeks were the best of the best, those were a journey with Eddie through the training, felt like I was there. I would LOVE to read another book layed out, setup and with that same idea. Take a person, train em, feed em, write the whole thing in linear fashion like that. Best BB books ever for me.
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HeavyHitter32

The first time I ever even heard of HIT was in late 1991 where I was at a bookstore at the mall (Waldenbooks?) and came across 100 High Intensity Ways. Loved the read and the one set concept blew me away. My legs actually grew in short time from the Leg-arm emphasis routine in that book, but it was too demanding for me to keep up. lol However, it was a radical change from the monotonous, low intensity volume stuff I had been doing.
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Donnie Hunt

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
The first time I ever even heard of HIT was in late 1991 where I was at a bookstore at the mall (Waldenbooks?) and came across 100 High Intensity Ways. Loved the read and the one set concept blew me away. My legs actually grew in short time from the Leg-arm emphasis routine in that book, but it was too demanding for me to keep up. lol However, it was a radical change from the monotonous, low intensity volume stuff I had been doing.


I think it might have been '91 for me too. I think the first time I heard of doing one or maybe two working sets was from reading a Mentzer article in FLEX or Muscle & Fitness.
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Chris H

Nwlifter wrote:
Lioncourt wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
Average Al,

The article about self-publishing is mostly true. Very few people make any money at all on such endeavors. I'm probably going to do an eBook soon, but it will be condensed and short: about 70 pages.

Ellington

This sounds very exciting to me. Unlike others in this discussion I prefer digital books so I can have them anywhere on my iPad. Your last 3 I have only ordered the Kindle versions.

oh wow, never met anyone that prefers digital, I love having a real book, seeing it on the shelf, and not having to look at a bright screen while reading it. I love picking up an old book I bought back in the 80's, it reminds me of those days...



i agree with you. A book, a paperback or hard cover is alive.
Anything digitalis-ed is not.
Probably will end up buying a kindle however as so much of what i want to read is only available an an E
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Nwlifter

Chris H wrote:
Nwlifter wrote:
Lioncourt wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
Average Al,

The article about self-publishing is mostly true. Very few people make any money at all on such endeavors. I'm probably going to do an eBook soon, but it will be condensed and short: about 70 pages.

Ellington

This sounds very exciting to me. Unlike others in this discussion I prefer digital books so I can have them anywhere on my iPad. Your last 3 I have only ordered the Kindle versions.

oh wow, never met anyone that prefers digital, I love having a real book, seeing it on the shelf, and not having to look at a bright screen while reading it. I love picking up an old book I bought back in the 80's, it reminds me of those days...



i agree with you. A book, a paperback or hard cover is alive.
Anything digitalis-ed is not.
Probably will end up buying a kindle however as so much of what i want to read is only available an an E


True... now a days it's either e-book or nothing.. rats...
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HeavyHitter32

Donnie Hunt wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
The first time I ever even heard of HIT was in late 1991 where I was at a bookstore at the mall (Waldenbooks?) and came across 100 High Intensity Ways. Loved the read and the one set concept blew me away. My legs actually grew in short time from the Leg-arm emphasis routine in that book, but it was too demanding for me to keep up. lol However, it was a radical change from the monotonous, low intensity volume stuff I had been doing.

I think it might have been '91 for me too. I think the first time I heard of doing one or maybe two working sets was from reading a Mentzer article in FLEX or Muscle & Fitness.


After my Darden reading, around 1992 I recall a convincing two-part interview with Mentzer in Iron Man magazine...which eventually prompted me to do a phone consultation with him by Jan 1993.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
All my publishing contacts say there's too much free stuff about bodybuilding on the Internet. Therefore, no one wants to publish a book on bodybuilding because it won't sell.

Maybe things will change in a couple of years?

Ellington


==Scott==
I have quite a few of your books and others and maybe it's just me but I rarely look at books like yours or anyone elses books on muscle building for information on how to build muscles. I love to read old stories and and see pictures to go with it of old time bodybuilders and trainers like you and others in action. Routines, programs, how to do a curl, who cares, I've seen it all. Picture books is where it's at for me!
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