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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Jones vs Darden vs Mentzer vs Hutchins vs Brzycki vs Johnston vs Baye vs... et al
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Equity

Controversial lol!!!

Who's training ideas are best in the HIT 'sphere'? And WHY!!!

Pro's and Con's and comparisons of their different approaches and so on.

All opinions appreciated.

Regards!
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Equity

I forgot to mention Little, McGuff and Grant in this line up (apologies there especially Grant).

I'm not trying to cause a storm here as I believe a lot of HIT protocols work anyway and the body gets used over time to any single method.

The juxtaposition of the various approaches over the years; I thought would be an interesting topic for a thread.

Thanks.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
In my opinion of those names mentioned only Jones ,Darden and Johnston have any original ideas. Mentzer and Baye and the rest are just hanger oners of Jones ideas.
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st3

Great post!
Here is my personal experience.

I never really tried Jones routines as I came into HIT thru reading Darden.

I used the early routines which were a bit too much volume and I didn't completely understand recovery.

Later routines/books were great for me. If you notice Els writing he's a subtle master at variation which I think is very important.

In my bodybuilding days I used Mentzer's booklets as my go to. I got great results from the split routines.

I used Hutchins SS for a while but I couldn't sustain it for longer than a few weeks.

Johnston has been a go to for me. I'm now way more individualized. I listen to my body more and "feel" my way through my workout.

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Nwlifter

I'd say, for actual HIT training, Darden's info. is easily the best
* Routines from minimal to extensive
* Full body and even split one book
* Incorporates NTF workouts for recovery
* Many methods for variation
* Specialization routines
* He understands there's more to growth than just poundage progression at any cost.
* Lots of proven photographic client success

Brian's stuff is great too, but it's not HIT so I have to separate it out from the rest.
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epdavis7

Stuart McRobert and his Brawn series and hardgainer magazine were very influential to many. Though not HIT per se, it is still abbreviated training focusing on the basics and getting stronger. Dick Conner, Jim Flanagan, Ken Leistner, Ian Duckett, Doug Holland, John Christy and a Powerlifter who?s name escapes me we?re all abbreviated trainers.
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HeavyHitter32

I like Darden's stuff so long as some NTF is incorporated. I like the variations recommended, different techniques, etc.

If one was insistent on going to failure 100% of the time on every move, something like Mentzer's HDI routine would be preferred IMO.
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Rikus

I didn't make any gains until Darden's books. And then I found the variation and cycling intensity techniques between bodyparts worked best. But I did this using Darden's style workouts.

Then via this forum found Johnston and that helped me take it to another level. Re-enforced what I had found and that i had to use variation to trigger growth. And he gave me a bunch more ideas of ways to do that.

Mentzers stuff did nothing for me. SS I tried from Darden's books....I think its more complicated and hard to use to make gains. Better off with faster controlled reps.

Jones is the original. But Darden is what got me into it.

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MMHD

They all work if properly applied. One thing 40 years of training has taught me is the importance of variation.

Maybe the best approach would be to cycle between all of them while changing routines every 3-6 months or when gains slow down.

The other thing of great importance is intensity. I used to torture myself with going to failure and beyond on EVERY set! Now I realize the importance of NTF training. I usually end a set two to thee reps shy of failure and my muscles actually look bigger and fuller because I'm able to train more often, and I'm not brutalizing my muscles at every workout with going to failure and beyond.
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too old

MMHD, could not agree with you more regarding not going to failure , plus extenders.
BTW- what is your current routine like?
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AndyMitch

I found my way via Nautilus gen 1 the owner gave me a Dr Darden book which lead me to a website he had previous to this (I can?t remember the name of it) sort of like a question and answer board, some dudes where asking Darden about powerlifting and Dr Darden politely suggests Cyberpump, I went there and that?s where my world of strength building opened up.

Art always stated the best way to learn is to try things.
And this has worked for me, so I guess it?s a lot of factors but to this day Arthur is still a huge influence on me in terms of strength building
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hit4me

Florida, USA

I first used nautilus in a nautilus gym back around 1980, I was a teenager with no money, therefore could not afford the membership, so I did not stay with it and I never heard of Jones or Darden...however, when Conan the Barbarian came out in 81, I was hooked on Arnold and Franco's training methods.....it wasn't until Yates that I found out about HIT, so I was first influenced by Yates on HIT (but became injured due to the explosiveness), then Mentzer (but became fat due to consolidation routines and bad diet), then Jones and finally Darden.....I have
found that being 55, that Dardens
influence was the safest for me (injury
free) and I have lost some bodyfat by following his dietary guidelines, but am struggling to meet my goal.
at this point in my life I have no regrets of all of these influences or trying the different methods...but, I will say that Darden and Jones influence me the most nowadays..especially with the new 30-10-30 method.


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entsminger

Virginia, USA

== Scott==
I first got the Nautilus bug from the first Ironman magazine Jones wrote in. In the early 70s I came to Deland hoping to buy at least a pullover but couldn?t afford one. I then went to the patent office to get the plan so I could build one my self but the plan was rudimentary and didn?t help . Later when Nautilus lost popularity I got just about every Nautilus I wanted but even today having all those machines and others I typically just use a pair of dumbbells and do 2 or three sets of curls, laterals, rows, presses , pushups and a few other basic exercises to near failure.
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BorisV

Maryland, USA

I would not put Brian Johnston's name in the same HIT category alongside other names mentioned in this thread. Although Brian has spent a lot of time and efforts in HIT area (his books "Prescribed Exercise", "Higher Intelligence Training", to name just a few) and had HIT certification program at IART (before selling this organization to Mike Lipowski), I consider him to be a bodybuilding guru. Which means that there is more to bodybuilding than HIT alone. For me Johnston is Vince Gironda of modern times. However, from pure HIT perspective, I think Dr. Darden is the HIT expert par excellence - I believe he coined the term HIT and systematized the knowledge and practice of HIT with great results. Arthur Jones remains a maverick inventor for me, whose interests gravitated in later years from bodybuilding to other areas (sport conditioning, rehabilitation, etc.) and whose later works do not provide a full and clear guidance for those interested in bodybuilding per se. Although, in the modern world ruled by social media where everybody thinks he is an expert in everything, I miss Jones' books and his public speeches so much.
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Equity

BorisV wrote:
I would not put Brian Johnston's name in the same HIT category alongside other names mentioned in this thread. Although Brian has spent a lot of time and efforts in HIT area (his books "Prescribed Exercise", "Higher Intelligence Training", to name just a few) and had HIT certification program at IART (before selling this organization to Mike Lipowski), I consider him to be a bodybuilding guru. Which means that there is more to bodybuilding than HIT alone. For me Johnston is Vince Gironda of modern times. However, from pure HIT perspective, I think Dr. Darden is the HIT expert par excellence - I believe he coined the term HIT and systematized the knowledge and practice of HIT with great results. Arthur Jones remains a maverick inventor for me, whose interests gravitated in later years from bodybuilding to other areas (sport conditioning, rehabilitation, etc.) and whose later works do not provide a full and clear guidance for those interested in bodybuilding per se. Although, in the modern world ruled by social media where everybody thinks he is an expert in everything, I miss Jones' books and his public speeches so much.


Fair points and good post.

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