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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Max Contraction Training
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

John Little was kind enough to give me permission to post his whole 2004 DVD on his Max Contraction training protocol.

Hope everyone enjoys it.

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=G0HaIO01xws

Michael
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sirloin

Michael Petrella wrote:
John Little was kind enough to give me permission to post his whole 2004 DVD on his Max Contraction training protocol.

Hope everyone enjoys it.

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=G0HaIO01xws

Michael


Great technique, still salt in heavy static holds into my training. Its just a pity they felt the need to oil up an olympic athlete and have him stand posing, its as if to imply this is you could look if you use this technique aswell.
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Donnie Hunt

Definitely got some ideas from Max Contraction training that I use in my training. I find stuff like this interesting even if after learning about I don't see use for it.
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Bastion

Great to see this vid. Except the trainee could have worn a shirt minus the oil.
Statics are a great technique to use when and where applicable. At the end of a set taken to failure. I find them great on leg extension, preacher or concentration curl, side laterals. Across the board I think its pretty difficult for the majority of us to use. I'm not a fan of the recommended 6sec holds. I've always gone 30-60 sec, averaging about 45sec.
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BorisV

Maryland, USA

I haven't seen validated case studies on seasoned drug-free athlete/bodybuilders showing superiority of Max Contraction training for muscle mass gains. I don't remember John Little publishing them either. I have concerns over the theoretical and practical sides of the protocol, with a lack of a sufficient number of high-density contractions (as a prerequisite for proper inroad & muscle fatigue) being the major one. You can integrate static holds into any other method, but I would not do it on its own. Tangentially, I have doubts regarding any method which has a severe impact on CNS (general fatigue) necessitating a prolonged recovery.
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HeavyHitter32

I occasionally do static holds at the end of a set for a 10-15 sec hold.

Or, I might do something like leg presses, lunge, followed by a 15 sec hold to fatigue with the squat in a parallel position.

But we're talking statics taking up ~5% of my training time if/when implemented.

I tried the Pete Sisco approach exclusively back in the 90s...I regressed on it.
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Nwlifter

BorisV wrote:
I haven't seen validated case studies on seasoned drug-free athlete/bodybuilders showing superiority of Max Contraction training for muscle mass gains. I don't remember John Little publishing them either. I have concerns over the theoretical and practical sides of the protocol, with a lack of a sufficient number of high-density contractions (as a prerequisite for proper inroad & muscle fatigue) being the major one. You can integrate static holds into any other method, but I would not do it on its own. Tangentially, I have doubts regarding any method which has a severe impact on CNS (general fatigue) necessitating a prolonged recovery.


Yes exactly...
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dipsrule

Pennsylvania, USA

So a few weeks ago I bought a soloflex for 50 bucks.

I only wanted it for chins or negative only chins.

There may be a few other moves I could do by putting a bar through the movement arm so I can use weights. Not the bands.

I figured I was going to flip a bunch of the heavier bands and get my money back.

Ironically I saw this max contraction video.

There are a few moves that will work using those bands.

I just have to get into the contracted position and hold.

It works well. You just holding resistance.

I don't buy the claims. I don't even care. It's just a tool in the toolbox I can use once in a while.

I will hold for longer times though. Up to 60 seconds.

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Nwlifter

dipsrule wrote:
So a few weeks ago I bought a soloflex for 50 bucks.

I only wanted it for chins or negative only chins.

There may be a few other moves I could do by putting a bar through the movement arm so I can use weights. Not the bands.

I figured I was going to flip a bunch of the heavier bands and get my money back.

Ironically I saw this max contraction video.

There are a few moves that will work using those bands.

I just have to get into the contracted position and hold.

It works well. You just holding resistance.

I don't buy the claims. I don't even care. It's just a tool in the toolbox I can use once in a while.

I will hold for longer times though. Up to 60 seconds.



50 bucks wow... I remember, oh so long ago, when they came out, I used to want one but they were over a thousand dollars, so no way would I spend that for the rubber band setup, but they still seemed cool to me. Now 50 bucks, I'd buy one for that just to finally say I owned one. Great bargain you got!
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Michael Petrella wrote:
John Little was kind enough to give me permission to post his whole 2004 DVD on his Max Contraction training protocol.

Hope everyone enjoys it.

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=G0HaIO01xws

Michael


==Scott==
The part that sticks to me is the quote at the very beginning that this is so revolutionary that it will make physiologists rethink things. Really??
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ptcrusader

I am a big fan of isometrics, provided that Valsalva maneuver (breath holding)is avoided. This assumes the goal of muscle tone as oppose to major muscle hypertrophy. I personally found that isometrics plus post isometric concentric exercise (like Calisthenic exercise) improved strength and performance in untrained athletes.

My protocol progressed to a 30 second isometric hold of a weight, followed by as many reps with the weight as possible (10 as the goal) followed by as slow of an eccentric lowering of the weight as practical. (This is real hard but produced results in all 10 trainees in terms of strength gains and increased performance. This occurred for both untrained and trained individuals. Unfortunately, none enjoyed the program due to its difficulty.)

Dr. Darden's 30-10-30 protocol is similar, substituting a long eccentric in the beginning instead of an isometric hold.) It is probably a more refined method but in my opinion, it potentially has a similar draw back. Namely, it can be difficult to perform correctly without good supervision.(Thus necessitating the use of a personal trainer or spotter.)

Current football and track athletes are trained mostly with heavy Olympic lifts with plyometric supplementation. If the trainee stays healthy, the athlete tends to show improvement in strength and performance up to his or her plateau.

The above is my opinion and I recognize that results and opinions may vary.
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Average Al

Nwlifter wrote:
BorisV wrote:
I haven't seen validated case studies on seasoned drug-free athlete/bodybuilders showing superiority of Max Contraction training for muscle mass gains. I don't remember John Little publishing them either. I have concerns over the theoretical and practical sides of the protocol, with a lack of a sufficient number of high-density contractions (as a prerequisite for proper inroad & muscle fatigue) being the major one. You can integrate static holds into any other method, but I would not do it on its own. Tangentially, I have doubts regarding any method which has a severe impact on CNS (general fatigue) necessitating a prolonged recovery.

Yes exactly...


Agree...

He took information on isometric training from an old physiology book, combined that with a questionable assertion by Arthur Jones, and sold it as a revolutionary training method.

Some time after the Max Contraction stuff was published, he came up with the Maximum Moment Arm method of training. That approach was sounder from a physiological perspective, and was also safer and more practical. But that never got turned into a book.
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

sirloin wrote:
Michael Petrella wrote:
John Little was kind enough to give me permission to post his whole 2004 DVD on his Max Contraction training protocol.

Hope everyone enjoys it.

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=G0HaIO01xws

Michael



He is on the right track.
To do it correctly you need a momentum arm hooked up to a force cell so your could measure your strength statically at about 4 different points of rom such as with a calf raise or wrist curl at least and many more points of resistance for other exercises with different / greater roms such as a pullover. Similar to the MedX medical testing machines.
Pick your points, say every 10 points along a rom for the pullover which is usually 240 degrees.So at every 24 points you would perform a static contraction, as hard as you possibly can,hold it as long as possible until you start to lose strength and then slowly reduce the force you are exerting
This is then your starting level of strength for that point for that exercise.
Continue on until you've recorded your strength level for all 10 points.
Time between exercises would be determined by your inroad level at any particular point.
Say at 0 degrees,at 24 degrees and at 48 degrees of pullover rom your inroad is 110 at 0 is 60 at24 it's 58and for 48 your inroad is 58. Those are high degrees of inroad suggesting exercise at those points every 7-10 days As for the rest your inroad is 5,6,4 5,3,4. So that degree of inroad is very low suggesting exercise 2-3 times a week for those points of ROM for the pullover.
So the next time you perform these static contractions you have an overlay on a computer screen telling you how much force you produced last time and how much force you are producing now so you have the motivation to exceed what you did last time.
You don't need any kind of weights and you can not only factor in slow twitch vs fast twitch protocols but Arthur's Type S and Type G determinations.
Such machines would be much less expensive because weight stacks,guide rods,pulleys,cams, kevlar belts , 4 bar linkage would all be obsolete.
You would have machines designed very much like MedX medical machines but the testing part of the machine would be added to any other exercise machine, perhaps with some problems with compound exercises but perhaps not as much as I think.
The biggest problem would be selling it to gym owners and then gym goers.
If you take this idea and run with it , remember you heard it from me first.
This is just thinking out loud for me. I haven't given it too much more than this right now but I could give it from a little more thought to extensive thought, it depends.
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ATP 4 Vitality

ptcrusader wrote:
I am a big fan of isometrics, provided that Valsalva maneuver (breath holding)is avoided. This assumes the goal of muscle tone as oppose to major muscle hypertrophy. I personally found that isometrics plus post isometric concentric exercise (like Calisthenic exercise) improved strength and performance in untrained athletes.

My protocol progressed to a 30 second isometric hold of a weight, followed by as many reps with the weight as possible (10 as the goal) followed by as slow of an eccentric lowering of the weight as practical. (This is real hard but produced results in all 10 trainees in terms of strength gains and increased performance. This occurred for both untrained and trained individuals. Unfortunately, none enjoyed the program due to its difficulty.)

Dr. Darden's 30-10-30 protocol is similar, substituting a long eccentric in the beginning instead of an isometric hold.) It is probably a more refined method but in my opinion, it potentially has a similar draw back. Namely, it can be difficult to perform correctly without good supervision.(Thus necessitating the use of a personal trainer or spotter.)

Current football and track athletes are trained mostly with heavy Olympic lifts with plyometric supplementation. If the trainee stays healthy, the athlete tends to show improvement in strength and performance up to his or her plateau.

The above is my opinion and I recognize that results and opinions may vary.


Thanks for a great post
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19hit

it does seem a little like a LOST video clip from the atchives
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19hit

Incredible he released this for free as it was very costly when it came out. Poor versions where available on youtube though.
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