MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
Quasi Isometrics for Strength and Hypertrophy
Author
Rating
Options

sgb2112

The Russian Training Secret

https://www.T-Nation.com/...training-secret
Open User Options Menu

19hit

I have seen something simular used on MikePetrellas' youtube upload of contraction training is actually by john Little. Little also posted superlong reps from the old body-by_science days

sgb2112 wrote:
The Russian Training Secret

https://www.T-Nation.com/...-secret


Open User Options Menu

BorisV

Maryland, USA

sgb2112 wrote:
The Russian Training Secret

https://www.T-Nation.com/...-secret


I am originally from Russia and moved to US with my family about 5 years ago. Never heard and have never seen the technique described in the article while training in dozens of gyms in Russia. Probably, a well-kept secret :-)
Open User Options Menu

sgb2112

Prof. Victor Selouyanov. Type in 'Soviet Super Slow' for more info.

Style of performance: super slow, no acceleration.
Range of motion: partial that does not allow rest at any point.

Set duration: 30-60 seconds to failure (both heavy and light days).

Rest between sets of a given exercise: 5-10 minutes, active (walk, ?fast and loose?). Other exercises may be done during that window.

Resistance: 30-70% 1RM for the lower body and 10-40% 1RM for the upper body. No difference in resistance
from heavy to light day.

Weekly schedule: bodybuilding style split training; a heavy day and a light day per muscle

Volume: 4-9 sets on heavy day; 1-3 sets on light day.
Open User Options Menu

19hit

Thank you for summary. Well noted NO ACCELERATION!

sgb2112 wrote:
Prof. Victor Selouyanov. Type in 'Soviet Super Slow' for more info.

Style of performance: super slow, no acceleration.
Range of motion: partial that does not allow rest at any point.

Set duration: 30-60 seconds to failure (both heavy and light days).

Rest between sets of a given exercise: 5-10 minutes, active (walk, ?fast and loose?). Other exercises may be done during that window.

Resistance: 30-70% 1RM for the lower body and 10-40% 1RM for the upper body. No difference in resistance
from heavy to light day.

Weekly schedule: bodybuilding style split training; a heavy day and a light day per muscle

Volume: 4-9 sets on heavy day; 1-3 sets on light day.


Open User Options Menu

ptcrusader

As I have shared before, I like the protocol. The problem is that it is hard and not real enjoyable for most trainees.

Volume training takes more time but seems to be more enjoyable for most.
Open User Options Menu

19hit

Yes it is incrediblely brutaly hard which is why we do it. Harder is or isn't better?

ptcrusader wrote:
As I have shared before, I like the protocol. The problem is that it is hard and not real enjoyable for most trainees.

Volume training takes more time but seems to be more enjoyable for most.


Open User Options Menu

ptcrusader

My experience suggests that folks train for different reasons. Some to do better in sports, some for aesthetics, some for stress relief, some for health benefits.

Hypertrophy as a goal? Endurance as a goal? Weight loss as a goal?

There are so many variables. Thus, for some harder is not necessarily better. My trainees improved a lot with variations of isometric protocols incorporation some eccentric movements; however, most did not like it.

Seems like many prefer to enjoy their workouts.
Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

ptcrusader wrote:
My experience suggests that folks train for different reasons. Some to do better in sports, some for aesthetics, some for stress relief, some for health benefits.

Hypertrophy as a goal? Endurance as a goal? Weight loss as a goal?

There are so many variables. Thus, for some harder is not necessarily better. My trainees improved a lot with variations of isometric protocols incorporation some eccentric movements; however, most did not like it.

Seems like many prefer to enjoy their workouts.


there is a great book "if you like exercise, chancers are you are doing it wrong".....one of my favs
Open User Options Menu

sirloin

hit4me wrote:
ptcrusader wrote:
My experience suggests that folks train for different reasons. Some to do better in sports, some for aesthetics, some for stress relief, some for health benefits.

Hypertrophy as a goal? Endurance as a goal? Weight loss as a goal?

There are so many variables. Thus, for some harder is not necessarily better. My trainees improved a lot with variations of isometric protocols incorporation some eccentric movements; however, most did not like it.

Seems like many prefer to enjoy their workouts.

there is a great book "if you like exercise, chancers are you are doing it wrong".....one of my favs


Reminds me of something Nasser El Sonbaty said "when someone tells me they enjoy training, their telling me they are mentally ill" lol brilliant!
Open User Options Menu

tensionstrength

The topic of enjoying your workouts vs not enjoying your workouts is one that usually gets my attention. I had been lifting weights at least for a little while before I believe I even heard of exercise being called something you shouldn't enjoy or do for recreation. I honestly get the arguments to some degree for both views.

Running for long distances is an activity that I have wondered what the feeling must be like. I have some friends that are what I would consider running addicts. I have never been a fan of distance running and when I have done even a fraction of it the feeling of discomfort is very high for me. Is this something that eventually goes away?? Just some ramblings of mine. I just would find it very hard to do something like running for great lengths of time and experiencing that feeling of discomfort for a long period of time, if that is just a part of it.
Open User Options Menu

Average Al

19hit wrote:
Yes it is incrediblely brutaly hard which is why we do it. Harder is or isn't better?



It depends on what you do to make it harder.

Example 1: do a high volume of eccentrics, make yourself incredibly sore, and end up in the hospital with rhabo and kidney failure. Brutal outcome, not productive.

Example 2: train for a long time in the hot sun, don't drink any water, get dehydrated, get heat stroke and die. Very brutal.

Example 3: just hold your breath for the duration of the set. Incredibly brutal! If the set is long enough, you might even pass out!! Productive???

Yah... silly examples I suppose. Except I still occasionally see news stories where the first two things have happened.
Open User Options Menu

sirloin

19hit wrote:
Thank you for summary. Well noted NO ACCELERATION!

sgb2112 wrote:
Prof. Victor Selouyanov. Type in 'Soviet Super Slow' for more info.

Style of performance: super slow, no acceleration.
Range of motion: partial that does not allow rest at any point.

Set duration: 30-60 seconds to failure (both heavy and light days).

Rest between sets of a given exercise: 5-10 minutes, active (walk, ?fast and loose?). Other exercises may be done during that window.

Resistance: 30-70% 1RM for the lower body and 10-40% 1RM for the upper body. No difference in resistance
from heavy to light day.

Weekly schedule: bodybuilding style split training; a heavy day and a light day per muscle

Volume: 4-9 sets on heavy day; 1-3 sets on light day.




Yup, its Grant alright
Open User Options Menu
Administrators Online: Mod Phoenix
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy